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6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT) 6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT)

Description

6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design. 6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design.

Subjects

natural language processing | natural language processing | computational methods | computational methods | computer science | computer science | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | linguistic theory | linguistic theory | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | applications | applications | thematic structure | thematic structure | lexical-conceptual structure | lexical-conceptual structure | semantic structure | semantic structure | pragmatic structure | pragmatic structure | discourse structure | discourse structure | phonology | phonology | morphology | morphology | 2-level morphology | 2-level morphology | kimmo | kimmo | hmm tagging | hmm tagging | tagging | tagging | rule-based tagging | rule-based tagging | part of speech tagging | part of speech tagging | brill tagger | brill tagger | parsing | parsing | syntax | syntax | automata | automata | word modeling | word modeling | grammars | grammars | parsing algorithms | parsing algorithms | shift-reduce parsers | shift-reduce parsers | Earley's algorithm | Earley's algorithm | chart parsing | chart parsing | context-free parsing | context-free parsing | feature-based parsing | feature-based parsing | natural language system design | natural language system design | integrated lexicon | integrated lexicon | syntactic features | syntactic features | semantic interpretation | semantic interpretation | compositionality | compositionality | quantifiers | quantifiers | lexical semantic | lexical semantic | semantics | semantics | machine translation | machine translation | language learning | language learning | computational models of language | computational models of language | origins of language | origins of language | 6.863 | 6.863 | 9.611 | 9.611

License

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Coastal systems: coral cay island morphology

Description

YouTube presentation

Subjects

geography | coasts | geomorphology | coral cay | island | morphology | ukoer | geesoer | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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12.163 Surface Processes and Landscape Evolution (MIT) 12.163 Surface Processes and Landscape Evolution (MIT)

Description

The course offers an introduction to quantitative analysis of geomorphic processes, and examines the interaction of climate, tectonics, and surface processes in the sculpting of Earth's surface. The course offers an introduction to quantitative analysis of geomorphic processes, and examines the interaction of climate, tectonics, and surface processes in the sculpting of Earth's surface.

Subjects

geomorphic processes | geomorphic processes | climate | climate | tectonics | tectonics | surface processes | surface processes | fluvial processes | fluvial processes | hillslope processes | hillslope processes | glacial processes | glacial processes | weathering | weathering | soil formation | soil formation | runoff | runoff | erosion | erosion | slope stability | slope stability | sediment transport | sediment transport | river morphology | river morphology | glacial erosion | glacial erosion | climatic forcings | climatic forcings | tectonic forcings | tectonic forcings | glaciation | glaciation | sea level change | sea level change | uplift | subsidence | uplift | subsidence | post-glacial isostatic rebound | post-glacial isostatic rebound | uplift | subsidence | uplift | subsidence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.901 Language and its Structure I: Phonology (MIT) 24.901 Language and its Structure I: Phonology (MIT)

Description

24.901 is designed to give you a preliminary understanding of how the sound systems of different languages are structured, how and why they may differ from each other. The course also aims to provide you with analytical tools in phonology, enough to allow you to sketch the analysis of an entire phonological system by the end of the term. On a non-linguistic level, the couse aims to teach you by example the virtues of formulating precise and explicit descriptive statements; and to develop your skills in making and evaluating arguments. 24.901 is designed to give you a preliminary understanding of how the sound systems of different languages are structured, how and why they may differ from each other. The course also aims to provide you with analytical tools in phonology, enough to allow you to sketch the analysis of an entire phonological system by the end of the term. On a non-linguistic level, the couse aims to teach you by example the virtues of formulating precise and explicit descriptive statements; and to develop your skills in making and evaluating arguments.

Subjects

fundamental concepts | fundamental concepts | phonological theory | phonological theory | philosophy | philosophy | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | articulatory phonetics | articulatory phonetics | acoustic phonetics | acoustic phonetics | feature systems | feature systems | underlying representations | underlying representations | underspecification | underspecification | phonological rules | phonological rules | phonological derivations | phonological derivations | syllable structure | syllable structure | accentual systems | accentual systems | morphology-phonology interface | morphology-phonology interface

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT) 24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Throughout the course, we will be learning (in many different ways) that human language is a surprisingly intricate -- yet law-governed and fascinating mental system. In the first 2/3 of the class, we will study some core aspects of this system in detail. In the last part of the class, we will use what we have learned to address a variety of questions, including how children acquire language, ways in which languages are affected by contact with other languages, and the representation of linguistic phenomena in the brain, among others. This class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Throughout the course, we will be learning (in many different ways) that human language is a surprisingly intricate -- yet law-governed and fascinating mental system. In the first 2/3 of the class, we will study some core aspects of this system in detail. In the last part of the class, we will use what we have learned to address a variety of questions, including how children acquire language, ways in which languages are affected by contact with other languages, and the representation of linguistic phenomena in the brain, among others.

Subjects

language | language | syntax | syntax | language acquisition | language acquisition | speech | speech | writing | writing | morphology | morphology | phonetics | phonetics | linguistics | linguistics | linguistic fieldwork | linguistic fieldwork | phonology | phonology | Animal Communication | Animal Communication | semantics | semantics | Historical linguistics | Historical linguistics

License

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24.901 Language and Its Structure I: Phonology (MIT) 24.901 Language and Its Structure I: Phonology (MIT)

Description

24.901 is designed to give you a preliminary understanding of how the sound systems of different languages are structured, how and why they may differ from each other. The course also aims to provide you with analytical tools in phonology, enough to allow you to sketch the analysis of an entire phonological system by the end of the term. On a non-linguistic level, the course aims to teach you by example the virtues of formulating precise and explicit descriptive statements; and to develop your skills in making and evaluating arguments. 24.901 is designed to give you a preliminary understanding of how the sound systems of different languages are structured, how and why they may differ from each other. The course also aims to provide you with analytical tools in phonology, enough to allow you to sketch the analysis of an entire phonological system by the end of the term. On a non-linguistic level, the course aims to teach you by example the virtues of formulating precise and explicit descriptive statements; and to develop your skills in making and evaluating arguments.

Subjects

phonetics | phonetics | phonology | phonology | tone and intonation | tone and intonation | alternations | alternations | chain shift | chain shift | vowel morphology | vowel morphology | sociolinguistic variables | sociolinguistic variables

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.961 Introduction to Phonology (MIT) 24.961 Introduction to Phonology (MIT)

Description

The year-long Introduction to Phonology reviews at the graduate level fundamental notions of phonological analysis and introduces students to current debates, research and analytical techniques. The Fall term reviews issues pertaining to the nature of markedness and phonological representations - features, prosodies, syllables and stress - while the second term deals with the relation between the phonological component and the lexicon, morphology and syntax. The second term course will also treat in more detail certain phonological phenomena. The year-long Introduction to Phonology reviews at the graduate level fundamental notions of phonological analysis and introduces students to current debates, research and analytical techniques. The Fall term reviews issues pertaining to the nature of markedness and phonological representations - features, prosodies, syllables and stress - while the second term deals with the relation between the phonological component and the lexicon, morphology and syntax. The second term course will also treat in more detail certain phonological phenomena.

Subjects

Phonology | Phonology | research | research | phonological theory | phonological theory | models | models | approaches | approaches | modes of argumentation | modes of argumentation | research tools: problem sets | research tools: problem sets | squibs | squibs | abstracts | abstracts | reviews | reviews | markedness | markedness | phonological representations | phonological representations | features | features | prosodies | prosodies | syllables | syllables | stress | stress | lexicon | lexicon | morphology | morphology | syntax | syntax | acquisition | acquisition | perception | perception | sound change | sound change

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT)

Description

6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design.

Subjects

natural language processing | computational methods | computer science | artificial intelligence | linguistic theory | psycholinguistics | applications | thematic structure | lexical-conceptual structure | semantic structure | pragmatic structure | discourse structure | phonology | morphology | 2-level morphology | kimmo | hmm tagging | tagging | rule-based tagging | part of speech tagging | brill tagger | parsing | syntax | automata | word modeling | grammars | parsing algorithms | shift-reduce parsers | Earley's algorithm | chart parsing | context-free parsing | feature-based parsing | natural language system design | integrated lexicon | syntactic features | semantic interpretation | compositionality | quantifiers | lexical semantic | semantics | machine translation | language learning | computational models of language | origins of language | 6.863 | 9.611

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.961 Introduction to Phonology (MIT) 24.961 Introduction to Phonology (MIT)

Description

The year-long Introduction to Phonology reviews at the graduate level fundamental notions of phonological analysis and introduces students to current debates, research and analytical techniques. The Fall term reviews issues pertaining to the nature of markedness and phonological representations - features, prosodies, syllables and stress - while the second term deals with the relation between the phonological component and the lexicon, morphology and syntax. The second term course will also treat in more detail certain phonological phenomena. The year-long Introduction to Phonology reviews at the graduate level fundamental notions of phonological analysis and introduces students to current debates, research and analytical techniques. The Fall term reviews issues pertaining to the nature of markedness and phonological representations - features, prosodies, syllables and stress - while the second term deals with the relation between the phonological component and the lexicon, morphology and syntax. The second term course will also treat in more detail certain phonological phenomena.

Subjects

Phonology | Phonology | research | research | phonological theory | phonological theory | models | models | approaches | approaches | modes of argumentation | modes of argumentation | research tools: problem sets | research tools: problem sets | squibs | squibs | abstracts | abstracts | reviews | reviews | markedness | markedness | phonological representations | phonological representations | features | features | prosodies | prosodies | syllables | syllables | stress | stress | lexicon | lexicon | morphology | morphology | syntax | syntax | acquisition | acquisition | perception | perception | sound change | sound change

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.57J Language Acquisition (MIT) 9.57J Language Acquisition (MIT)

Description

Covers the major results in the study of first language acquisition concentrating on the development of linguistic structure, including sentence structure and morphology. Universal aspects of development are discussed, as well as a variety of cross-linguistic phenomena. Theories of language learning are considered, including parameter-setting and maturation. Covers the major results in the study of first language acquisition concentrating on the development of linguistic structure, including sentence structure and morphology. Universal aspects of development are discussed, as well as a variety of cross-linguistic phenomena. Theories of language learning are considered, including parameter-setting and maturation.

Subjects

first language | first language | acquisition | acquisition | linguistic structure | linguistic structure | sentence structure | sentence structure | morphology | morphology | learning | learning | parameter-setting | parameter-setting | maturation | maturation | 9.57 | 9.57 | 24.904 | 24.904

License

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21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT) 21L.707 Arthurian Literature and Celtic Colonization (MIT)

Description

The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chr├ętien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti The course examines the earliest emergence of stories about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table in the context of the first wave of British Imperialism and the expanded powers of the Catholic Church during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The morphology of Arthurian romance will be set off against original historical documents and chronicle sources for the English conquests in Brittany, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland to understand the ways in which these new attitudes towards Empire were being mythologized. Authors will include Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chr├ętien de Troyes, Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, together with some lesser known works like the Perilous Graveyard, the Knight with the Sword, and Perlesvaus, or the High History of the Holy Graal. Special attenti

Subjects

Literature | Literature | celtic | celtic | colonization | colonization | King Arthur | King Arthur | Knights of the Round Table | Knights of the Round Table | British Imperialism | British Imperialism | Catholic Church | Catholic Church | twelfth century | twelfth century | thirteenth century | thirteenth century | morphology | morphology | Arthurian romance | Arthurian romance | historical documents | historical documents | English conquests | English conquests | Brittany | Brittany | Wales | Wales | Scotland | Scotland | Ireland | Ireland | Bede | Bede | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Geoffrey of Monmouth | Chr?tien de Troyes | Chr?tien de Troyes | Marie de France | Marie de France | Gerald of Wales | Gerald of Wales | Perilous Graveyard | Perilous Graveyard | Knight of the Sword | Knight of the Sword | Perlesvaus | Perlesvaus | High History of the Holy Graal | High History of the Holy Graal

License

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9.601J Language Acquisition I (MIT) 9.601J Language Acquisition I (MIT)

Description

Lectures, reading, and discussion of current theory and data concerning the psychology and biology of language acquisition. Emphasizes learning of syntax and morphology, together with some discussion of phonology, and especially research relating grammatical theory and learnability theory to empirical studies of children. Lectures, reading, and discussion of current theory and data concerning the psychology and biology of language acquisition. Emphasizes learning of syntax and morphology, together with some discussion of phonology, and especially research relating grammatical theory and learnability theory to empirical studies of children.

Subjects

psychology | psychology | language acquisition | language acquisition | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | phonology | phonology | grammatical theory | grammatical theory | children | children | 9.601 | 9.601 | 24.949 | 24.949

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.616 Innovative Businesses and Breakthrough Technologies - The Legal Issues (MIT) 15.616 Innovative Businesses and Breakthrough Technologies - The Legal Issues (MIT)

Description

15.616 is an introduction to business law which covers the fundamentals, including contracts, liability, regulation, employment, and corporations, with an in-depth treatment of the legal issues relating to breakthrough technologies, including the legal framework of R&D, the commercialization of new high-technology products in start-ups and mature companies, and the liability and regulatory implications of new products and innovative business models. There is extensive attention to national and international intellectual property protection and strategies. Examples are drawn from many industries, including information technology, communications, and life sciences. Note: This course used to be numbered 15.648. 15.616 is an introduction to business law which covers the fundamentals, including contracts, liability, regulation, employment, and corporations, with an in-depth treatment of the legal issues relating to breakthrough technologies, including the legal framework of R&D, the commercialization of new high-technology products in start-ups and mature companies, and the liability and regulatory implications of new products and innovative business models. There is extensive attention to national and international intellectual property protection and strategies. Examples are drawn from many industries, including information technology, communications, and life sciences. Note: This course used to be numbered 15.648.

Subjects

geomorphic processes | geomorphic processes | climate | climate | tectonics | tectonics | surface processes | surface processes | fluvial processes | fluvial processes | hillslope processes | hillslope processes | glacial processes | glacial processes | weathering | weathering | soil formation | soil formation | runoff | runoff | erosion | erosion | slope stability | slope stability | sediment transport | sediment transport | river morphology | river morphology | glacial erosion | glacial erosion | climatic forcings | climatic forcings | tectonic forcings | tectonic forcings | glaciation | glaciation | sea level change | sea level change | uplift | subsidence | uplift | subsidence | post-glacial isostatic rebound | post-glacial isostatic rebound | contracts | contracts | liability | liability | regulation | regulation | business law | business law | employment | employment | corporations | corporations | in-depth treatment of the legal issues relating to breakthrough technologies | in-depth treatment of the legal issues relating to breakthrough technologies | D | D | commercialization of new high-technology products | commercialization of new high-technology products | start-ups | start-ups | liability and regulatory implications of new products and innovative business models | liability and regulatory implications of new products and innovative business models | national and international intellectual property | national and international intellectual property | intellectual property | intellectual property | industries | industries | information technology | information technology | communications | communications | life sciences | life sciences

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.750 Modeling Issues in Speech and Hearing (MIT) HST.750 Modeling Issues in Speech and Hearing (MIT)

Description

This course explores the theory and practice of scientific modeling in the context of auditory and speech biophysics. Based on seminar-style discussions of the research literature, the class draws on examples from hearing and speech, and explores general, meta-theoretical issues that transcend the particular subject matter. Examples include: What is a model? What is the process of model building? What are the different approaches to modeling? What is the relationship between theory and experiment? How are models tested? What constitutes a good model? This course explores the theory and practice of scientific modeling in the context of auditory and speech biophysics. Based on seminar-style discussions of the research literature, the class draws on examples from hearing and speech, and explores general, meta-theoretical issues that transcend the particular subject matter. Examples include: What is a model? What is the process of model building? What are the different approaches to modeling? What is the relationship between theory and experiment? How are models tested? What constitutes a good model?

Subjects

hearing | hearing | speech | speech | modeling biology | modeling biology | network model of the ear | network model of the ear | model building | model building | dimensional analysis and scaling | dimensional analysis and scaling | resampling | resampling | monte carlo | monte carlo | forward vs. inverse | forward vs. inverse | chaos | chaos | limits of prediction | limits of prediction | hodgkin | hodgkin | huxley | huxley | molecular mathematic biology | molecular mathematic biology | cochlear input impedance | cochlear input impedance | auditory network | auditory network | auditory morphology | auditory morphology | electric model of neural cell fiber | electric model of neural cell fiber | electric diagrams of neural cells | electric diagrams of neural cells | linear regression | linear regression | sensitivity analysis | sensitivity analysis | cochlea | cochlea | inner ear | inner ear | middle ear | middle ear | auditory cortex | auditory cortex | scientific literature | scientific literature | analysis | analysis | paper analysis | paper analysis | tent maps | tent maps | quadratic maps | quadratic maps

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.961 Introduction to Phonology (MIT) 24.961 Introduction to Phonology (MIT)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to the current research questions in phonological theory. Topics include metrical and prosodic structure, features and their phonetic basis in speech, acquisition and parsing, phonological domains, morphology, and language change and reconstruction. Activities include problem solving, squibs, and data collection. This course serves as an introduction to the current research questions in phonological theory. Topics include metrical and prosodic structure, features and their phonetic basis in speech, acquisition and parsing, phonological domains, morphology, and language change and reconstruction. Activities include problem solving, squibs, and data collection.

Subjects

phonology | phonology | optimality theory | optimality theory | generative grammar | generative grammar | language | language | linguistic theory | linguistic theory | phonetics | phonetics | SPE model | SPE model | constraint conjunction | constraint conjunction | conspiracies | conspiracies | phonotactics | phonotactics | markedness | markedness | typology | typology | remote interaction | remote interaction | harmonic serialism | harmonic serialism | geminates | geminates | skeleton | skeleton | underspecification | underspecification | contrast constraints | contrast constraints | harmony | harmony | tone | tone | sonority | sonority | weight | weight | metrical grid | metrical grid | rhythm | rhythm | prosodic morphology | prosodic morphology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT) 24.900 Introduction to Linguistics (MIT)

Description

This core-curriculum linguistics class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Topics include the intricate system that governs language, how it is acquired, the similarities and differences among languages, and how spoken (and signed) language relates to written language, among others. This core-curriculum linguistics class will provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language. Topics include the intricate system that governs language, how it is acquired, the similarities and differences among languages, and how spoken (and signed) language relates to written language, among others.

Subjects

language | language | syntax | syntax | language acquisition | language acquisition | speech | speech | writing | writing | morphology | morphology | phonetics | phonetics | linguistics | linguistics | linguistic fieldwork | linguistic fieldwork | phonology | phonology | Animal Communication | Animal Communication | semantics | semantics | Historical linguistics | Historical linguistics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.007 Geobiology (MIT) 12.007 Geobiology (MIT)

Description

The interactive Earth system: biology in geologic, environmental and climate change throughout Earth history. Since life began it has continually shaped and re-shaped the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. This course introduces the concept of 'life as a geological agent' and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly 4 billion years since life first appeared. The interactive Earth system: biology in geologic, environmental and climate change throughout Earth history. Since life began it has continually shaped and re-shaped the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the solid earth. This course introduces the concept of 'life as a geological agent' and examines the interaction between biology and the earth system during the roughly 4 billion years since life first appeared.

Subjects

interactive Earth system;biology | interactive Earth system;biology | geologic | geologic | environmental and climate change | environmental and climate change | atmosphere | atmosphere | hydrosphere | hydrosphere | cryosphere | cryosphere | solar system | solar system | evolution;global warming | evolution;global warming | global carbon cycle | global carbon cycle | Astrobiology. | Astrobiology. | evolution | evolution | global warming | global warming | Interactive earth system | Interactive earth system | biology | biology | geologic change | geologic change | environmental change | environmental change | climate change | climate change | Earth history | Earth history | life | life | solid earth | solid earth | geological agent | geological agent | astrobiology | astrobiology | biogeomorphology | biogeomorphology | long-term climate cycles | long-term climate cycles | mass extinctions | mass extinctions | biogeochemical tracers | biogeochemical tracers | origin of life | origin of life | antiquity | antiquity | habitable zone | habitable zone | deep biosphere | deep biosphere | geological time | geological time

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Coastal systems: beach morphology

Description

YouTube presentation

Subjects

coasts | geography | geomorphology | beach morphology | beaches | earth sciences | environmental sciences | ukoer | geesoer | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Coastal systems: delta development

Description

YouTube presentation

Subjects

coasts | geography | earth sciences | environmental sciences | geomorphology | delta | trailing edge | erosion | cyclones | plate tectonics | ukoer | geesoer | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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12.163 Surface Processes and Landscape Evolution (MIT)

Description

The course offers an introduction to quantitative analysis of geomorphic processes, and examines the interaction of climate, tectonics, and surface processes in the sculpting of Earth's surface.

Subjects

geomorphic processes | climate | tectonics | surface processes | fluvial processes | hillslope processes | glacial processes | weathering | soil formation | runoff | erosion | slope stability | sediment transport | river morphology | glacial erosion | climatic forcings | tectonic forcings | glaciation | sea level change | uplift | subsidence | post-glacial isostatic rebound | uplift | subsidence

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Techniques for Studying Materials: Atomic Force Microscopy

Description

This set of animations provides understanding of what Atomic Force Microscopy is and how it is used. From TLP: Atomic Force Microscopy

Subjects

afm | atomic force microscopy | surface morphology | cantilever deflection | contact | mode | tapping | artefact | nanotechnology | lateral force imaging | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | animation | corematerials | ukoer

License

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Coastal systems: gravel beaches 1

Description

Part 1 of 3 of 'Coastal systems: gravel beaches'

Subjects

geography | earth sciences | environmental sciences | coasts | geomorphology | gravel beaches | ukoer | geesoer | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Coastal systems: waves 6

Description

Part 6 of 9 of 'Coastal systems: waves'

Subjects

coasts | geography | earth sciences | geomorphology | waves | beaches | refraction | ukoer | geesoer | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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