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21M.380 Music and Technology (Contemporary History and Aesthetics) (MIT) 21M.380 Music and Technology (Contemporary History and Aesthetics) (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course is an investigation into the history and aesthetics of music and technology as deployed in experimental and popular musics from the 19th century to the present. Through original research, creative hands-on projects, readings, and lectures, the following topics will be explored. The history of radio, audio recording, and the recording studio, as well as the development of musique concrète and early electronic instruments. The creation and extension of musical interfaces by composers such as Harry Partch, John Cage, Conlon Nancarrow, and others. The exploration of electromagnetic technologies in pickups, and the development of dub, hip-hop, and turntablism. The history and application of the analog syn Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course is an investigation into the history and aesthetics of music and technology as deployed in experimental and popular musics from the 19th century to the present. Through original research, creative hands-on projects, readings, and lectures, the following topics will be explored. The history of radio, audio recording, and the recording studio, as well as the development of musique concrète and early electronic instruments. The creation and extension of musical interfaces by composers such as Harry Partch, John Cage, Conlon Nancarrow, and others. The exploration of electromagnetic technologies in pickups, and the development of dub, hip-hop, and turntablism. The history and application of the analog syn

Subjects

audio | audio | music technology | music technology | sound recording | sound recording | sound reproduction | sound reproduction | contemporary music | contemporary music | experimental music | experimental music | electronic music | electronic music | synthesis | synthesis | synthesizers | synthesizers | music history | music history | music software | music software | analog recording | analog recording | digital recording | digital recording | digital audio | digital audio | music composition | music composition | computer music | computer music | Musique concr?te | Musique concr?te | rock music | rock music | rock and roll | rock and roll | hip hop | hip hop | circuit bending | circuit bending | phonograph | phonograph | radio | radio | noise music | noise music | recording studio | recording studio | sequencer | sequencer | sampling | sampling | sampler | sampler | sound art | sound art | electric guitar | electric guitar | turntablism | turntablism | scratching | scratching | electro-acoustic music | electro-acoustic music | music copyright | music copyright

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.361 Composing with Computers I (Electronic Music Composition) (MIT) 21M.361 Composing with Computers I (Electronic Music Composition) (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This class explores sound and what can be done with it. Sources are recorded from students' surroundings - sampled and electronically generated (both analog and digital). Assignments include composing with the sampled sounds, feedback, and noise, using digital signal processing (DSP), convolution, algorithms, and simple mixing. The class focuses on sonic and compositional aspects rather than technology, math, or acoustics, though these are examined in varying detail. Students complete weekly composition and listening assignments; material for the latter is drawn from sound art, experimental electronica, conventional and non-conventional classical electronic works, popular music, and previous students' compositions. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This class explores sound and what can be done with it. Sources are recorded from students' surroundings - sampled and electronically generated (both analog and digital). Assignments include composing with the sampled sounds, feedback, and noise, using digital signal processing (DSP), convolution, algorithms, and simple mixing. The class focuses on sonic and compositional aspects rather than technology, math, or acoustics, though these are examined in varying detail. Students complete weekly composition and listening assignments; material for the latter is drawn from sound art, experimental electronica, conventional and non-conventional classical electronic works, popular music, and previous students' compositions.

Subjects

computer music | computer music | sound | sound | music | music | audio | audio | listening | listening | electronic music | electronic music | new music | new music | electronica | electronica | sound art | sound art | noise | noise | noise music | noise music | avant-garde | avant-garde | contemporary music | contemporary music | modern music | modern music | composition | composition | recording | recording | music production | music production | recording studio | recording studio | audio software | audio software | recording software | recording software | sampling | sampling | synthesis | synthesis | audio engineering | audio engineering | mixing | mixing | Radiohead | Radiohead

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.262 Modern Music: 1900-1960 (MIT) 21M.262 Modern Music: 1900-1960 (MIT)

Description

This subject covers a specific branch of music history: Western concert music of first sixty years of the twentieth century. Although we will be listening to and studying many pieces (most of the highest caliber) the goal of the course is not solely to build up a repertory of works in our memory (though that is indeed a goal). We will be most concerned with larger questions of continuity and change in music. We will also consider questions of reception, or historiography - that is, the creation of history and our perception of it. Why do we perceive much of this music, so much closer in time to us than Mozart or Beethoven, to be so foreign? Is this music aloof and separate from popular music of the twentieth century or is there a real connection (perhaps hidden)? The subject will continue This subject covers a specific branch of music history: Western concert music of first sixty years of the twentieth century. Although we will be listening to and studying many pieces (most of the highest caliber) the goal of the course is not solely to build up a repertory of works in our memory (though that is indeed a goal). We will be most concerned with larger questions of continuity and change in music. We will also consider questions of reception, or historiography - that is, the creation of history and our perception of it. Why do we perceive much of this music, so much closer in time to us than Mozart or Beethoven, to be so foreign? Is this music aloof and separate from popular music of the twentieth century or is there a real connection (perhaps hidden)? The subject will continue

Subjects

contemporary music | contemporary music | 20th century music | 20th century music | modern art | modern art | serialism | serialism | atonal | atonal | atonality | atonality | microtonal | microtonal | musicology | musicology | composition | composition | concert music | concert music | classical music | classical music | chamber music | chamber music | American music | American music | music history | music history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Amanulu de Remy of the Haitian Rara band Konbo Guinyn performing in Miami Amanulu de Remy of the Haitian Rara band Konbo Guinyn performing in Miami

Description

Subjects

musicians | musicians | women | women | singing | singing | florida | florida | miami | miami | performingarts | performingarts | hats | hats | singers | singers | womenmusicians | womenmusicians | miamidadecounty | miamidadecounty | personaladornment | personaladornment | domesticarts | domesticarts | artsperforming | artsperforming | musicalintstruments | musicalintstruments | musicaltraditions | musicaltraditions | ethnicityhaitian | ethnicityhaitian | musicaltraditionshaitian | musicaltraditionshaitian | konboguinynmusicalgroup | konboguinynmusicalgroup | deremyamanulu | deremyamanulu | musicaltraditionslatinamericanandcaribbean | musicaltraditionslatinamericanandcaribbean | songshaitian | songshaitian | ethnicitylatinamericanandcaribbean | ethnicitylatinamericanandcaribbean | haitianamericanentertainers | haitianamericanentertainers | saltzmanrikicollector | saltzmanrikicollector | haitianamericanmusicians | haitianamericanmusicians

License

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21M.011 Introduction to Western Music (MIT) 21M.011 Introduction to Western Music (MIT)

Description

This course gives a broad overview of Western music from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, with emphasis on late baroque, classical, romantic, and modernist styles (1700-1910). It is also meant to enhance students' musical experience by developing listening skills and an understanding of diverse forms and genres. Major composers and their works will be placed in social and cultural contexts. Weekly lectures feature demonstrations by professional performers, and introduce topics to be discussed in sections. The focus of the course is on the weekly listening and reading assignments. This course gives a broad overview of Western music from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, with emphasis on late baroque, classical, romantic, and modernist styles (1700-1910). It is also meant to enhance students' musical experience by developing listening skills and an understanding of diverse forms and genres. Major composers and their works will be placed in social and cultural contexts. Weekly lectures feature demonstrations by professional performers, and introduce topics to be discussed in sections. The focus of the course is on the weekly listening and reading assignments.

Subjects

western music | western music | baroque music | baroque music | classical music | classical music | romantic music | romantic music | Bach | Bach | modernist music | modernist music | listening skills | listening skills | social context of music | social context of music | cultural context of music | cultural context of music | major composers | major composers | Haydn | Haydn | Mozart | Mozart | concerto | concerto | opera | opera | Beethoven | Beethoven | Vivaldi | Vivaldi | Handel | Handel | Schubert | Schubert | Chopin | Chopin | jazz | jazz

License

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21M.380 Music and Technology: Live Electronics Performance Practices (MIT) 21M.380 Music and Technology: Live Electronics Performance Practices (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video, AV special element audio. This course is a creative, hands-on exploration of contemporary and historical approaches to live electronics performance and improvisation, including basic analog instrument design, computer synthesis programming, and hardware and software interface design. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video, AV special element audio. This course is a creative, hands-on exploration of contemporary and historical approaches to live electronics performance and improvisation, including basic analog instrument design, computer synthesis programming, and hardware and software interface design.

Subjects

Music composition | Music composition | music history | music history | computer music | computer music | music performance | music performance | electronic music | electronic music | contemporary music | contemporary music | music synthesis | music synthesis | improvisation | improvisation | analog electronics | analog electronics | live electronic music | live electronic music | electroacoustic improvisation | electroacoustic improvisation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.380 Music and Technology: Algorithmic and Generative Music (MIT) 21M.380 Music and Technology: Algorithmic and Generative Music (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This course examines the history, techniques, and aesthetics of mechanical and computer-aided approaches to algorithmic music composition and generative music systems. Through creative hands-on projects, readings, listening assignments, and lectures, students will explore a variety of historical and contemporary approaches. Diverse tools and systems will be employed, including applications in Python, MIDI, Csound, SuperCollider, and Pure Data. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This course examines the history, techniques, and aesthetics of mechanical and computer-aided approaches to algorithmic music composition and generative music systems. Through creative hands-on projects, readings, listening assignments, and lectures, students will explore a variety of historical and contemporary approaches. Diverse tools and systems will be employed, including applications in Python, MIDI, Csound, SuperCollider, and Pure Data.

Subjects

Music composition | Music composition | music history | music history | music aesthetics | music aesthetics | algorithmic composition | algorithmic composition | generative music | generative music | computer music | computer music | electronic music | electronic music | contemporary music | contemporary music | music synthesis | music synthesis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.065 Introduction to Musical Composition (MIT) 21M.065 Introduction to Musical Composition (MIT)

Description

Through a progressive series of composition projects, students investigate the sonic organization of musical works and performances, focusing on fundamental questions of unity and variety. Aesthetic issues are considered in the pragmatic context of the instructions that composers provide to achieve a desired musical result, whether these instructions are notated in prose, as graphic images, or in symbolic notation. No formal training is required. Weekly listening, reading, and composition assignments draw on a broad range of musical styles and intellectual traditions, from various cultures and historical periods. Through a progressive series of composition projects, students investigate the sonic organization of musical works and performances, focusing on fundamental questions of unity and variety. Aesthetic issues are considered in the pragmatic context of the instructions that composers provide to achieve a desired musical result, whether these instructions are notated in prose, as graphic images, or in symbolic notation. No formal training is required. Weekly listening, reading, and composition assignments draw on a broad range of musical styles and intellectual traditions, from various cultures and historical periods.

Subjects

form | form | structure | structure | notation | notation | musical score | musical score | composer | composer | composing | composing | music history | music history | deep listening | deep listening | sound | sound | soundwalk | soundwalk | instrument building | instrument building | contemporary music | contemporary music | avant-garde music | avant-garde music | experimental music | experimental music | graphic score | graphic score | Musique Concrete | Musique Concrete | vocal music | vocal music

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.S53 Chinese Popular Musics in Dialogue (MIT) 21M.S53 Chinese Popular Musics in Dialogue (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the major popular music cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. We will consider a wide variety of genres, from Shanghainese shidaiqu to Cantopop to Taiwanese rap, with the goal of listening beyond the notion of a monolithic "Chinese popular music" to something more dynamic, multivocal, and translocal. We will ask: What, if anything, is so "Chinese" about Chinese popular music? How does popular music participate in the formation of identities for artists and audiences in these areas? How does it enable the articulation of diverging social and political values while also facilitating meaningful connections among disparate communities? We will approach these questions through a diverse array of source materials, including sound reco This course provides an introduction to the major popular music cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. We will consider a wide variety of genres, from Shanghainese shidaiqu to Cantopop to Taiwanese rap, with the goal of listening beyond the notion of a monolithic "Chinese popular music" to something more dynamic, multivocal, and translocal. We will ask: What, if anything, is so "Chinese" about Chinese popular music? How does popular music participate in the formation of identities for artists and audiences in these areas? How does it enable the articulation of diverging social and political values while also facilitating meaningful connections among disparate communities? We will approach these questions through a diverse array of source materials, including sound reco

Subjects

Chinese popular music | Chinese popular music | Cantonese popular music | Cantonese popular music | Taiwanese popular music | Taiwanese popular music | Shidaiqu | Shidaiqu | Cantopop | Cantopop | Taiwanese rap | Taiwanese rap | Chinese rock'n'roll | Chinese rock'n'roll | music sociology | music sociology | cultural studies | cultural studies | transnational music studies | transnational music studies | ethnomusicology | ethnomusicology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.380 Music and Technology (Contemporary History and Aesthetics) (MIT)

Description

This course is an investigation into the history and aesthetics of music and technology as deployed in experimental and popular musics from the 19th century to the present. Through original research, creative hands-on projects, readings, and lectures, the following topics will be explored. The history of radio, audio recording, and the recording studio, as well as the development of musique concrte and early electronic instruments. The creation and extension of musical interfaces by composers such as Harry Partch, John Cage, Conlon Nancarrow, and others. The exploration of electromagnetic technologies in pickups, and the development of dub, hip-hop, and turntablism. The history and application of the analog synthesizer, from the Moog modular to the Roland TR-808. The history of computer

Subjects

audio | music technology | sound recording | sound reproduction | contemporary music | experimental music | electronic music | synthesis | synthesizers | music history | music software | analog recording | digital recording | digital audio | music composition | computer music | Musique concr?te | rock music | rock and roll | hip hop | circuit bending | phonograph | radio | noise music | recording studio | sequencer | sampling | sampler | sound art | electric guitar | turntablism | scratching | electro-acoustic music | music copyright

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.220 Early Music (MIT) 21M.220 Early Music (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course examines European music from the early Middle Ages until the end of the Renaissance. It includes a chronological survey and intensive study of three topics: chant and its development, music in Italy 1340-1420, and music in Elizabethan England. Instruction focuses on methods and pitfalls in studying music of the distant past. Students' papers, problem sets, and presentations explore lives, genres, and works in depth. Works are studied in facsimile of original notation, and from original manuscripts at MIT, where possible. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course examines European music from the early Middle Ages until the end of the Renaissance. It includes a chronological survey and intensive study of three topics: chant and its development, music in Italy 1340-1420, and music in Elizabethan England. Instruction focuses on methods and pitfalls in studying music of the distant past. Students' papers, problem sets, and presentations explore lives, genres, and works in depth. Works are studied in facsimile of original notation, and from original manuscripts at MIT, where possible.

Subjects

musicology | musicology | music history | music history | music composition | music composition | medieval music | medieval music | church music | church music | chant | chant | Gregorian chant | Gregorian chant | religious music | religious music | liturgy | liturgy | monody | monody | polyphony | polyphony | Trecento | Trecento | Elizabethan London | Elizabethan London | motet | motet | madrigal | madrigal | Renaissance | Renaissance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.030 Introduction to World Music (MIT) 21M.030 Introduction to World Music (MIT)

Description

This course explores the ways that music is both shaped by and gives shape to the cultural settings in which it is performed, through studying selected musical traditions from around the world. Specific case studies will be examined closely through listening, analysis, and hands-on instruction. The syllabus centers around weekly listening assignments and readings from a textbook with CDs, supplemented by hands-on workshops, lecture/demonstrations and concerts by master musicians from around the world. This course explores the ways that music is both shaped by and gives shape to the cultural settings in which it is performed, through studying selected musical traditions from around the world. Specific case studies will be examined closely through listening, analysis, and hands-on instruction. The syllabus centers around weekly listening assignments and readings from a textbook with CDs, supplemented by hands-on workshops, lecture/demonstrations and concerts by master musicians from around the world.

Subjects

Enthomusicology | Enthomusicology | field study | field study | music analysis | music analysis | anthropology | anthropology | culture | culture | globalization | globalization | crossover | crossover | folk music | folk music | ethnic music | ethnic music | roots music | roots music | international music | international music | gamelan | gamelan | raga | raga | blues | blues

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Pianist Ida Goodson performing at the Great Gulf Coast Arts Festival in Pensacola

Description

Subjects

music | women | florida | piano | festivals | blues | folkmusic | songs | gospel | pensacola | ethnicity | musicalinstruments | gospelmusic | folkfestivals | africanamericanwomen | materialculture | escambiacounty | folkmusicians | pianomusic | womenmusicians | africanamericanmusicians | bluesmusicians | artsperforming | greatgulfcoastartsfestival | gospelmusicians | musicaltraditions | owenblanton | africanamericangospelsingers | womenpianists | folklorerevivalfestivals | goodsonida

License

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21M.304 Writing in Tonal Forms II (MIT) 21M.304 Writing in Tonal Forms II (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course builds on the composition techniques practiced in 21M.303 Writing in Tonal Forms I. Students undertake further written and analytic exercises in tonal music, including a sonata-form movement for string quartet. Students will also have the opportunity to write short works that experiment with the expanded tonal techniques of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Musicianship laboratory is required. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course builds on the composition techniques practiced in 21M.303 Writing in Tonal Forms I. Students undertake further written and analytic exercises in tonal music, including a sonata-form movement for string quartet. Students will also have the opportunity to write short works that experiment with the expanded tonal techniques of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Musicianship laboratory is required.

Subjects

composition | composition | composing | composing | listening | listening | form | form | structure | structure | harmony | harmony | melody | melody | rhythm | rhythm | motif | motif | theme | theme | voicing | voicing | chord | chord | scale | scale | cadence | cadence | tonality | tonality | tonal music | tonal music | atonal music | atonal music | phrasing | phrasing | canon | canon | classical music | classical music | chamber music | chamber music | aesthetics | aesthetics | musical analysis | musical analysis | string quartet | string quartet | prokofiev | prokofiev | sonata form | sonata form | Haydn | Haydn | Mozart | Mozart | Beethoven | Beethoven

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.303 Writing in Tonal Forms I (MIT) 21M.303 Writing in Tonal Forms I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio, AV special element video, AV special element audio. Written and analytic exercises based on 18th- and 19th-century small forms and harmonic practice found in music such as the chorale preludes of Bach; minuets and trios of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven; and the songs and character pieces of Schubert and Schumann. Musicianship laboratory is required. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio, AV special element video, AV special element audio. Written and analytic exercises based on 18th- and 19th-century small forms and harmonic practice found in music such as the chorale preludes of Bach; minuets and trios of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven; and the songs and character pieces of Schubert and Schumann. Musicianship laboratory is required.

Subjects

composition | composition | composing | composing | listening | listening | form | form | structure | structure | harmony | harmony | melody | melody | rhythm | rhythm | motif | motif | theme | theme | voicing | voicing | chord | chord | scale | scale | cadence | cadence | tonality | tonality | tonal music | tonal music | phrasing | phrasing | canon | canon | classical music | classical music | chamber music | chamber music | aesthetics | aesthetics | musical analysis | musical analysis | romantic music | romantic music | romantic poetry | romantic poetry | lieder | lieder | string quartet | string quartet

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.351 Music Composition (MIT) 21M.351 Music Composition (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This course features directed composition of larger forms of original writing involving voices and/or instruments. It includes a weekly seminar in composition for the presentation and discussion of work in progress. Students are expected to produce at least one substantive work, performed in public, by the end of the term. Contemporary compositions and major works from 20th-century music literature are studied. Includes audio/video content: AV special element audio. This course features directed composition of larger forms of original writing involving voices and/or instruments. It includes a weekly seminar in composition for the presentation and discussion of work in progress. Students are expected to produce at least one substantive work, performed in public, by the end of the term. Contemporary compositions and major works from 20th-century music literature are studied.

Subjects

classical music | classical music | composer | composer | contemporary music | contemporary music | 20th century music | 20th century music | chamber music | chamber music | atonal | atonal | post-tonal | post-tonal | avant-garde music | avant-garde music | orchestration | orchestration | art song | art song | song | song

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.030 Introduction to World Music (MIT) 21M.030 Introduction to World Music (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to diverse musical traditions of the world. Music from a wide range of geographical areas is studied in terms of structure, performance practice, social use, aesthetics, and cross-cultural contact. Course work includes hands-on music making, live demonstrations by guest artists, and ethnographic research projects. This course is an introduction to diverse musical traditions of the world. Music from a wide range of geographical areas is studied in terms of structure, performance practice, social use, aesthetics, and cross-cultural contact. Course work includes hands-on music making, live demonstrations by guest artists, and ethnographic research projects.

Subjects

enthomusicology | enthomusicology | field study | field study | music analysis | music analysis | culture | culture | dance | dance | globalization | globalization | folk music | folk music | ethnic music | ethnic music | international music | international music | gamelan | gamelan | raga | raga | Senegal | Senegal | sabar | sabar

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.725 Music Perception and Cognition (MIT) HST.725 Music Perception and Cognition (MIT)

Description

Survey of perceptual and cognitive aspects of the psychology of music, with special emphasis on underlying neuronal and neurocomputational representations and mechanisms. Basic perceptual dimensions of hearing (pitch, timbre, consonance/roughness, loudness, auditory grouping) form salient qualities, contrasts, patterns and streams that are used in music to convey melody, harmony, rhythm and separate voices. Perceptual, cognitive, and neurophysiological aspects of the temporal dimension of music (rhythm, timing, duration, temporal expectation) are explored. Special topics include comparative, evolutionary, and developmental psychology of music perception, biological vs. cultural influences, Gestaltist vs. associationist vs. schema-based theories, comparison of music and speech perception, p Survey of perceptual and cognitive aspects of the psychology of music, with special emphasis on underlying neuronal and neurocomputational representations and mechanisms. Basic perceptual dimensions of hearing (pitch, timbre, consonance/roughness, loudness, auditory grouping) form salient qualities, contrasts, patterns and streams that are used in music to convey melody, harmony, rhythm and separate voices. Perceptual, cognitive, and neurophysiological aspects of the temporal dimension of music (rhythm, timing, duration, temporal expectation) are explored. Special topics include comparative, evolutionary, and developmental psychology of music perception, biological vs. cultural influences, Gestaltist vs. associationist vs. schema-based theories, comparison of music and speech perception, p

Subjects

music perception | music perception | music cognition | music cognition | music memory | music memory | pitch | pitch | timbre | timbre | consonance | consonance | harmony | harmony | tonality | tonality | melody | melody | expressive timing | expressive timing | rhythmic hierarchies | rhythmic hierarchies | auditory perception | auditory perception | auditory pathway | auditory pathway | musical acoustics | musical acoustics | power spectra | power spectra | psychophysics | psychophysics | neurocomputational models | neurocomputational models | neural correlates | neural correlates | music therapy | music therapy | synesthesia | synesthesia | absolute pitch | absolute pitch

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CMS.876 History of Media and Technology: Sound, the Minority Report -- Radical Music of the Past 100 Years (MIT) CMS.876 History of Media and Technology: Sound, the Minority Report -- Radical Music of the Past 100 Years (MIT)

Description

This course looks at the history of avant-garde and electronic music from the early twentieth century to the present. The class is organized as a theory and production seminar for which students may either produce audio/multimedia projects or a research paper. It engages music scholarship, cultural criticism, studio production, and multi-media development, such as recent software, sound design for film and games, and sound installation. Sound as a media tool for communication and sound as a form of artistic expression are subjects under discussion. The artists' work reviewed in the course includes selections from audio innovators such as the Italian Futurists, Edgard Varèse, John Cage, King Tubby, Brian Eno, Steve Reich, Afrika Bambaataa, Kraftwerk, Merzbow, Aphex Twin, Rza, Björk, and This course looks at the history of avant-garde and electronic music from the early twentieth century to the present. The class is organized as a theory and production seminar for which students may either produce audio/multimedia projects or a research paper. It engages music scholarship, cultural criticism, studio production, and multi-media development, such as recent software, sound design for film and games, and sound installation. Sound as a media tool for communication and sound as a form of artistic expression are subjects under discussion. The artists' work reviewed in the course includes selections from audio innovators such as the Italian Futurists, Edgard Varèse, John Cage, King Tubby, Brian Eno, Steve Reich, Afrika Bambaataa, Kraftwerk, Merzbow, Aphex Twin, Rza, Björk, and

Subjects

popular culture | popular culture | contemporary music | contemporary music | rock | rock | rap | rap | electronic music | electronic music | electronica | electronica | sampling | sampling | noise | noise | audio | audio | avant-garde | avant-garde | music criticism | music criticism | studio production | studio production | podcast | podcast | mashup | mashup | collage | collage | tape loop | tape loop | DJ | DJ | synthesizer | synthesizer | music synthesis | music synthesis | drum machine | drum machine | music concrete | music concrete

License

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21M.294 Popular Musics of the World (MIT) 21M.294 Popular Musics of the World (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on popular music, i.e. music created for and transmitted by mass media. Various popular music genres from around the world will be studied through listening, reading and written assignments, with an emphasis on class discussion. In particular, we will consider issues of musical change, syncretism, Westernization, globalization, the impact of recording industries, and the post-colonial era. Case studies will include Afro-pop, reggae, bhangra, rave, and global hip-hop. This course focuses on popular music, i.e. music created for and transmitted by mass media. Various popular music genres from around the world will be studied through listening, reading and written assignments, with an emphasis on class discussion. In particular, we will consider issues of musical change, syncretism, Westernization, globalization, the impact of recording industries, and the post-colonial era. Case studies will include Afro-pop, reggae, bhangra, rave, and global hip-hop.

Subjects

world music | world music | pop music | pop music | globalization | globalization | recording | recording | Afro-pop | Afro-pop | afropop | afropop | reggae | reggae | bhangra | bhangra | rave | rave | hip-hop | hip-hop | enthnomusicology | enthnomusicology | world beat | world beat | Senegal | Senegal | FelaKuti | FelaKuti | African music | African music | Paul Simon | Paul Simon | Graceland | Graceland | rap | rap | rap music | rap music | dance | dance | anthropology | anthropology | japanese pop | japanese pop | Egypt | Egypt | Egyptian pop | Egyptian pop | techno | techno | youth culture | youth culture | karaoke | karaoke | ska | ska | dancehall | dancehall | Bob Marley | Bob Marley

License

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21M.542 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Musical Time (MIT) 21M.542 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Musical Time (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video, AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of three broad topics concerning music in relation to time.Music as Architecture: the creation of musical shapes in time;Music as Memory: how musical understanding depends upon memory and reminiscence, with attention to analysis of musical structures; andTime as the Substance of Music: how different disciplines such as philosophy and neuroscience view the temporal dimension of musical processes and/or performances.Classroom discussion of these topics is complemented by three weekend concerts with pre-concert forums, jointly presented by the Boston Chamber Music Society (BCMS) and MIT Music & Theater Arts. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video, AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of three broad topics concerning music in relation to time.Music as Architecture: the creation of musical shapes in time;Music as Memory: how musical understanding depends upon memory and reminiscence, with attention to analysis of musical structures; andTime as the Substance of Music: how different disciplines such as philosophy and neuroscience view the temporal dimension of musical processes and/or performances.Classroom discussion of these topics is complemented by three weekend concerts with pre-concert forums, jointly presented by the Boston Chamber Music Society (BCMS) and MIT Music & Theater Arts.

Subjects

musical analysis | musical analysis | music theory | music theory | music appreciation | music appreciation | music composition | music composition | music performance | music performance | temporality | temporality | physics | physics | memory | memory | film score | film score | poetry | poetry

License

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HST.725 Music Perception and Cognition (MIT) HST.725 Music Perception and Cognition (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course is a survey of perceptual and cognitive aspects of the psychology of music, with special emphasis on underlying neuronal and neurocomputational representations and mechanisms. Basic perceptual dimensions of hearing (pitch, timbre, consonance/roughness, loudness, auditory grouping) form salient qualities, contrasts, patterns and streams that are used in music to convey melody, harmony, rhythm and separate voices. Perceptual, cognitive, and neurophysiological aspects of the temporal dimension of music (rhythm, timing, duration, temporal expectation) are explored. Special topics include comparative, evolutionary, and developmental psychology of music perception, biological vs. cultural influences, Gestaltist vs. associationis Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course is a survey of perceptual and cognitive aspects of the psychology of music, with special emphasis on underlying neuronal and neurocomputational representations and mechanisms. Basic perceptual dimensions of hearing (pitch, timbre, consonance/roughness, loudness, auditory grouping) form salient qualities, contrasts, patterns and streams that are used in music to convey melody, harmony, rhythm and separate voices. Perceptual, cognitive, and neurophysiological aspects of the temporal dimension of music (rhythm, timing, duration, temporal expectation) are explored. Special topics include comparative, evolutionary, and developmental psychology of music perception, biological vs. cultural influences, Gestaltist vs. associationis

Subjects

music perception | music perception | music cognition | music cognition | music memory | music memory | pitch | pitch | timbre | timbre | consonance | consonance | harmony | harmony | tonality | tonality | melody | melody | expressive timing | expressive timing | rhythmic hierarchies | rhythmic hierarchies | auditory perception | auditory perception | auditory pathway | auditory pathway | musical acoustics | musical acoustics | power spectra | power spectra | psychophysics | psychophysics | neurocomputational models | neurocomputational models | neural correlates | neural correlates | music therapy | music therapy | synesthesia | synesthesia | absolute pitch | absolute pitch

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.423 Introduction to Anglo-American Folkmusic (MIT) 21L.423 Introduction to Anglo-American Folkmusic (MIT)

Description

This subject will introduce students to scholarship about folk music of the British Isles and North America. We will define the qualities of "folk music" and "folk poetry," including the narrative qualities of ballads, and we will try to recreate the historical context in which such music was an essential part of everyday life. We will survey the history of collecting, beginning with Pepys' collection of broadsides, Percy's Reliques and the Gow collections of fiddle tunes. The urge to collect folk music will be placed in its larger historical, social and political contexts. We will trace the migrations of fiddle styles and of sung ballads to look at the broad outlines of the story of collecting folk music in the USA, especially in the nineteenth and twentieth centurie This subject will introduce students to scholarship about folk music of the British Isles and North America. We will define the qualities of "folk music" and "folk poetry," including the narrative qualities of ballads, and we will try to recreate the historical context in which such music was an essential part of everyday life. We will survey the history of collecting, beginning with Pepys' collection of broadsides, Percy's Reliques and the Gow collections of fiddle tunes. The urge to collect folk music will be placed in its larger historical, social and political contexts. We will trace the migrations of fiddle styles and of sung ballads to look at the broad outlines of the story of collecting folk music in the USA, especially in the nineteenth and twentieth centurie

Subjects

folk music | folk music | music production | music production | music transmission | music transmission | music preservation | music preservation | British Isles | British Isles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | folk revival | folk revival | balladry | balladry | fiddle styles | fiddle styles | 21M.223 | 21M.223

License

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21L.423J Introduction to Anglo-American Folk Music (MIT) 21L.423J Introduction to Anglo-American Folk Music (MIT)

Description

This course examines the production, transmission, preservation and qualities of folk music in the British Isles and North America from the 18th century to the folk revival of the 1960s and the present. There is a special emphasis on balladry, fiddle styles, and African-American influences. The class sings ballads and folk songs from the Child and Lomax collections as well as other sources as we examine them from literary, historical, and musical points of view. Readings supply critical and background materials from a number of sources. Visitors and films bring additional perspectives. This course examines the production, transmission, preservation and qualities of folk music in the British Isles and North America from the 18th century to the folk revival of the 1960s and the present. There is a special emphasis on balladry, fiddle styles, and African-American influences. The class sings ballads and folk songs from the Child and Lomax collections as well as other sources as we examine them from literary, historical, and musical points of view. Readings supply critical and background materials from a number of sources. Visitors and films bring additional perspectives.

Subjects

21L.423 | 21L.423 | 21M.223 | 21M.223 | music production | music production | music transmission | music transmission | music preservation | music preservation | folk music | folk music | British Isles | British Isles | North America | North America | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 17th century | 17th century | 18th century | 18th century | folk revival | folk revival | balladry | balladry | fiddle styles | fiddle styles | Lomax | Lomax | ballad | ballad | anglo-scottish ballads | anglo-scottish ballads | fiddle | fiddle | the great confluence | the great confluence | appalachia | appalachia

License

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21M.361 Composing with Computers I (Electronic Music Composition) (MIT)

Description

This class explores sound and what can be done with it. Sources are recorded from students' surroundings - sampled and electronically generated (both analog and digital). Assignments include composing with the sampled sounds, feedback, and noise, using digital signal processing (DSP), convolution, algorithms, and simple mixing. The class focuses on sonic and compositional aspects rather than technology, math, or acoustics, though these are examined in varying detail. Students complete weekly composition and listening assignments; material for the latter is drawn from sound art, experimental electronica, conventional and non-conventional classical electronic works, popular music, and previous students' compositions.

Subjects

computer music | sound | music | audio | listening | electronic music | new music | electronica | sound art | noise | noise music | avant-garde | contemporary music | modern music | composition | recording | music production | recording studio | audio software | recording software | sampling | synthesis | audio engineering | mixing | Radiohead

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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