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21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT) 21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a

Subjects

criminal justice | criminal justice | citizenship | citizenship | nationhood | nationhood | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | religion | religion | mass incarceration | mass incarceration | poverty | poverty | class | class | criminal punishment | criminal punishment | death penalty | death penalty | drug laws | drug laws | police | police | terrorism | terrorism | counter-terrorism | counter-terrorism | 9/11 | 9/11 | Ferguson | Ferguson | Michael Brown | Michael Brown | Trayvon Martin | Trayvon Martin | Jim Crow | Jim Crow | felon disenfranchisement | felon disenfranchisement | plea bargaining | plea bargaining | George Zimmerman | George Zimmerman | militarization | militarization | guilt | guilt | innocence | innocence | illegal alien | illegal alien | undocumented | undocumented | immigration | immigration | deportation | deportation | civil liberties | civil liberties | internment | internment | Japanese | Japanese | WWII | WWII | police brutality | police brutality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: Melville and Morrison (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: Melville and Morrison (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides intensive study of texts by two American authors (Herman Melville, 1819-1891, and Toni Morrison, 1931-) who, using lyrical, radically innovative prose, explore in different ways epic notions of American identity. Focusing on Melville's Typee (1846), Moby-Dick (1851), and The Confidence-Man (1857) and Morrison's Sula (1973), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), and Paradise (1998), the class will address their common concerns with issues of gender, race, language, and nationhood. Be prepared to read deeply (i.e. a small number of texts with considerable care), to draw on a variety of sources in different media, and to employ them in creative research, writing, and multimedia projects. This seminar provides intensive study of texts by two American authors (Herman Melville, 1819-1891, and Toni Morrison, 1931-) who, using lyrical, radically innovative prose, explore in different ways epic notions of American identity. Focusing on Melville's Typee (1846), Moby-Dick (1851), and The Confidence-Man (1857) and Morrison's Sula (1973), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), and Paradise (1998), the class will address their common concerns with issues of gender, race, language, and nationhood. Be prepared to read deeply (i.e. a small number of texts with considerable care), to draw on a variety of sources in different media, and to employ them in creative research, writing, and multimedia projects.

Subjects

literature | literature | herman melville | herman melville | toni morrison | toni morrison | epic | epic | american | american | moby dick | moby dick | beloved | beloved | gender | gender | race | race | language | language | nationhood | nationhood | multimedia | multimedia | women's studies | women's studies | culture | culture | film | film | text | text | SP.512 | SP.512 | WMN.512 | WMN.512

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The politics of nation-building: making co-nationals, refugees, and minorities

Description

RSC and Oxford Diasporas Programme special seminar. Professor Harris Mylonas (George Washington University). Recorded on 27 May 2014 at the Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. What drives a state?s choice to assimilate, accommodate, or exclude ethnic groups within its territory? In this talk, Harris Mylonas speaks on his book, The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees, and Minorities (Cambridge University Press, 2013), in which he argues that a state?s nation-building policies toward non-core groups ? any aggregation of individuals perceived as an ethnic group by the ruling elite of a state ? are influenced by both its foreign policy goals and its relations with the external patrons of these groups. Through a detailed study of Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

refugees | politics | law | nationality | nationhood | Foreign policy | refugees | politics | law | nationality | nationhood | Foreign policy | 2014-05-27

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.705 Major Authors: After the Masterpiece: Novels by Melville, Twain, Faulkner, and Morrison (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: After the Masterpiece: Novels by Melville, Twain, Faulkner, and Morrison (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides intensive study of exciting texts by four influential American authors. In studying paired works, we can enrich our sense of each author's distinctive methods, get a deeper sense of the development of their careers, and shake up our preconceptions about what makes an author or a work "great." Students will get an opportunity to research an author in depth, as well as making broader comparisons across the syllabus. This seminar provides intensive study of exciting texts by four influential American authors. In studying paired works, we can enrich our sense of each author's distinctive methods, get a deeper sense of the development of their careers, and shake up our preconceptions about what makes an author or a work "great." Students will get an opportunity to research an author in depth, as well as making broader comparisons across the syllabus.

Subjects

literature | literature | herman melville | herman melville | toni morrison | toni morrison | epic | epic | american | american | moby dick | moby dick | beloved | beloved | gender | gender | race | race | language | language | nationhood | nationhood | multimedia | multimedia | women's studies | women's studies | culture | culture | film | film | text | text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: Melville and Morrison (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: Melville and Morrison (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides intensive study of texts by two American authors (Herman Melville, 1819-1891, and Toni Morrison, 1931-) who, using lyrical, radically innovative prose, explore in different ways epic notions of American identity. Focusing on Melville's Typee (1846), Moby-Dick (1851), and The Confidence-Man (1857) and Morrison's Sula (1973), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), and Paradise (1998), the class will address their common concerns with issues of gender, race, language, and nationhood. Be prepared to read deeply (i.e. a small number of texts with considerable care), to draw on a variety of sources in different media, and to employ them in creative research, writing, and multimedia projects. This seminar provides intensive study of texts by two American authors (Herman Melville, 1819-1891, and Toni Morrison, 1931-) who, using lyrical, radically innovative prose, explore in different ways epic notions of American identity. Focusing on Melville's Typee (1846), Moby-Dick (1851), and The Confidence-Man (1857) and Morrison's Sula (1973), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), and Paradise (1998), the class will address their common concerns with issues of gender, race, language, and nationhood. Be prepared to read deeply (i.e. a small number of texts with considerable care), to draw on a variety of sources in different media, and to employ them in creative research, writing, and multimedia projects.

Subjects

literature | literature | herman melville | herman melville | toni morrison | toni morrison | epic | epic | american | american | moby dick | moby dick | beloved | beloved | gender | gender | race | race | language | language | nationhood | nationhood | multimedia | multimedia | women's studies | women's studies | culture | culture | film | film | text | text | SP.512 | SP.512 | WMN.512 | WMN.512

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT) 21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture. This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subjects

contemporary India | contemporary India | film | film | writers | writers | IT revolution | IT revolution | documentaries | documentaries | Indian culture | Indian culture | globalization | globalization | Indian cities | Indian cities | political events | political events | social events | social events | nationhood | nationhood | gender and class issues | gender and class issues | rural India | rural India | urban India | urban India | Devdas | Devdas | Mukul Kesavan | Mukul Kesavan | Deepa Mehta | Deepa Mehta | Chetan Bhagat | Chetan Bhagat | Salman Rushdie | Salman Rushdie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: Melville and Morrison (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides intensive study of texts by two American authors (Herman Melville, 1819-1891, and Toni Morrison, 1931-) who, using lyrical, radically innovative prose, explore in different ways epic notions of American identity. Focusing on Melville's Typee (1846), Moby-Dick (1851), and The Confidence-Man (1857) and Morrison's Sula (1973), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), and Paradise (1998), the class will address their common concerns with issues of gender, race, language, and nationhood. Be prepared to read deeply (i.e. a small number of texts with considerable care), to draw on a variety of sources in different media, and to employ them in creative research, writing, and multimedia projects.

Subjects

literature | herman melville | toni morrison | epic | american | moby dick | beloved | gender | race | language | nationhood | multimedia | women's studies | culture | film | text | SP.512 | WMN.512

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: After the Masterpiece: Novels by Melville, Twain, Faulkner, and Morrison (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides intensive study of exciting texts by four influential American authors. In studying paired works, we can enrich our sense of each author's distinctive methods, get a deeper sense of the development of their careers, and shake up our preconceptions about what makes an author or a work "great." Students will get an opportunity to research an author in depth, as well as making broader comparisons across the syllabus.

Subjects

literature | herman melville | toni morrison | epic | american | moby dick | beloved | gender | race | language | nationhood | multimedia | women's studies | culture | film | text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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21L.705 Major Authors: Melville and Morrison (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides intensive study of texts by two American authors (Herman Melville, 1819-1891, and Toni Morrison, 1931-) who, using lyrical, radically innovative prose, explore in different ways epic notions of American identity. Focusing on Melville's Typee (1846), Moby-Dick (1851), and The Confidence-Man (1857) and Morrison's Sula (1973), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), and Paradise (1998), the class will address their common concerns with issues of gender, race, language, and nationhood. Be prepared to read deeply (i.e. a small number of texts with considerable care), to draw on a variety of sources in different media, and to employ them in creative research, writing, and multimedia projects.

Subjects

literature | herman melville | toni morrison | epic | american | moby dick | beloved | gender | race | language | nationhood | multimedia | women's studies | culture | film | text | SP.512 | WMN.512

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subjects

contemporary India | film | writers | IT revolution | documentaries | Indian culture | globalization | Indian cities | political events | social events | nationhood | gender and class issues | rural India | urban India | Devdas | Mukul Kesavan | Deepa Mehta | Chetan Bhagat | Salman Rushdie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subjects

contemporary India | film | writers | IT revolution | documentaries | Indian culture | globalization | Indian cities | political events | social events | nationhood | gender and class issues | rural India | urban India | Devdas | Mukul Kesavan | Deepa Mehta | Chetan Bhagat | Salman Rushdie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to modern Indian culture and society through films, documentaries, short stories, novels, poems, and journalistic writing. The principal focus is on the study of major cultural developments and social debates in the last sixty five years of history through the reading of literature and viewing of film clips. The focus will be on the transformations of gender and class issues, representation of nationhood, the idea of regional identities and the place of the city in individual and communal lives. The cultural and historical background will be provided in class lectures. The idea is to explore the "other Indias" that lurk behind our constructed notion of a homogeneous national culture.

Subjects

contemporary India | film | writers | IT revolution | documentaries | Indian culture | globalization | Indian cities | political events | social events | nationhood | gender and class issues | rural India | urban India | Devdas | Mukul Kesavan | Deepa Mehta | Chetan Bhagat | Salman Rushdie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.319 Race, Crime, and Citizenship in American Law (MIT)

Description

This seminar looks at key issues in the historical development and current state of modern American criminal justice, with an emphasis on its relationship to citizenship, nationhood, and race/ethnicity. We begin with a range of perspectives on the rise of what is often called "mass incarceration": how did our current system of criminal punishment take shape, and what role did race play in that process? Part Two takes up a series of case studies, including racial disparities in the administration of the death penalty, enforcement of the drug laws, and the regulation of police investigations. The third and final part of the seminar looks at national security policing: the development of a constitutional law governing the intersection of ethnicity, religion, and counter-terrorism, a

Subjects

criminal justice | citizenship | nationhood | race | ethnicity | religion | mass incarceration | poverty | class | criminal punishment | death penalty | drug laws | police | terrorism | counter-terrorism | 9/11 | Ferguson | Michael Brown | Trayvon Martin | Jim Crow | felon disenfranchisement | plea bargaining | George Zimmerman | militarization | guilt | innocence | illegal alien | undocumented | immigration | deportation | civil liberties | internment | Japanese | WWII | police brutality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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