Searching for natural resources : 27 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability (MIT) 1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course covers the use of ecological and thermodynamic principles to examine interactions between humans and the natural environment. Topics include conservation and constitutive laws, box models, feedback, thermodynamic concepts, energy in natural and engineered systems, basic transport concepts, life cycle analysis and related economic methods.Topics such as renewable energy, sustainable agriculture, green buildings, and mitigation of climate change are illustrated with quantitative case studies. Case studies are team-oriented and may include numerical simulations and design exercises. Some programming experience is desirable but not a prerequisite. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication are provided. This course covers the use of ecological and thermodynamic principles to examine interactions between humans and the natural environment. Topics include conservation and constitutive laws, box models, feedback, thermodynamic concepts, energy in natural and engineered systems, basic transport concepts, life cycle analysis and related economic methods.Topics such as renewable energy, sustainable agriculture, green buildings, and mitigation of climate change are illustrated with quantitative case studies. Case studies are team-oriented and may include numerical simulations and design exercises. Some programming experience is desirable but not a prerequisite. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication are provided.

Subjects

systems | systems | conservation laws | conservation laws | constitutive laws | constitutive laws | box models | box models | mass conservation | mass conservation | perturbation methods | perturbation methods | thermodymanics | thermodymanics | heat transfer | heat transfer | enthalpy | enthalpy | entropy | entropy | multiphase systems | multiphase systems | mass and energy balances | mass and energy balances | energy supply options | energy supply options | economic value | economic value | natural resources | natural resources | multiobjective analysis | multiobjective analysis | life cycle analysis | life cycle analysis | mass and energy transport | mass and energy transport | green buildings | green buildings | transportation modeling | transportation modeling | renewable energy | renewable energy | climate modeling | climate modeling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Beyond the Bottom Billion

Description

Prof. Paul Collier discusses the contradiction of resource rich countries with troubled economies, including how the harnessing of natural assets can go wrong, and what can be done to ensure their correct handling. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

economics | Africa | natural resources | economics | Africa | natural resources | 2009-09-26

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Beyond the Bottom Billion

Description

Prof. Paul Collier discusses the contradiction of resource rich countries with troubled economies, including how the harnessing of natural assets can go wrong, and what can be done to ensure their correct handling. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

economics | Africa | natural resources | economics | Africa | natural resources | 2009-09-26

License

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17.405 Seminar on Politics and Conflict in the Middle East (MIT) 17.405 Seminar on Politics and Conflict in the Middle East (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on evolution of contemporary politics and economics. The subject is divided into four parts: Context: historical and strategic perspectives, theoretical issues, and sources and forms of conflict; Continuity: detailed analysis conflicts systems and their persistence, as well as regional competition and recent wars – focusing on specific countries and cases; Complexity: highlighting situation specific strategic gains and losses; and Convergence: focusing future configurations of conflict and cooperation. Throughout the course, special attention is given to sources and transformations of power, population dynamics and migration, resources and energy, as well as implications of technological change. This course focuses on evolution of contemporary politics and economics. The subject is divided into four parts: Context: historical and strategic perspectives, theoretical issues, and sources and forms of conflict; Continuity: detailed analysis conflicts systems and their persistence, as well as regional competition and recent wars – focusing on specific countries and cases; Complexity: highlighting situation specific strategic gains and losses; and Convergence: focusing future configurations of conflict and cooperation. Throughout the course, special attention is given to sources and transformations of power, population dynamics and migration, resources and energy, as well as implications of technological change.

Subjects

middle east | middle east | contemporary politics | contemporary politics | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | economics | economics | history | history | domestic policy | domestic policy | regional politics | regional politics | power | power | war | war | peace | peace | negotiation | negotiation | Iraq | Iraq | nation state | nation state | arab | arab | israel | israel | lebanon | lebanon | jordan | jordan | palestine | palestine | persian gulf | persian gulf | saudia arabia | saudia arabia | turkey | turkey | iran | iran | egypt | egypt | sudan | sudan | north africa | north africa | international relations | international relations | political science | political science | conflict | conflict | cooperation | cooperation | population dynamics | population dynamics | migration | migration | natural resources | natural resources | energy | energy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.183 Sustainable Design and Technology Research Workshop (MIT) 4.183 Sustainable Design and Technology Research Workshop (MIT)

Description

This workshop investigates the current state of sustainability in regards to architecture, from the level of the tectonic detail to the urban environment. Current research and case studies will be investigated, and students will propose their own solutions as part of the final project. This workshop investigates the current state of sustainability in regards to architecture, from the level of the tectonic detail to the urban environment. Current research and case studies will be investigated, and students will propose their own solutions as part of the final project.

Subjects

sustainable design | sustainable design | built environment | built environment | green design and technology | green design and technology | urbanism | urbanism | tectonics | tectonics | materials | materials | sustainability | sustainability | ecology | ecology | energy | energy | solar gain | solar gain | fossil fuels | fossil fuels | natural resources | natural resources | renewable energy | renewable energy | modern design | modern design | green design | green design | technology | technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.941 Use of Joint Fact Finding in Science Intensive Policy Disputes, Part I (MIT) 11.941 Use of Joint Fact Finding in Science Intensive Policy Disputes, Part I (MIT)

Description

11.941 and 11.942 make up a one-year seminar. The goal of this seminar is to explore the role of science and scientists in ecosystems and natural resources management focusing on joint fact finding as a new approach to environmental policy-making. Increasingly scientists and science organizations are confronting a conundrum: Why is science often ignored in important societal decisions even as the call for decisions based on sound science escalates? One reason is that decision-making is often driven by a variety of nonscientific, adversarial, and stakeholder dynamics. Thus, even though science helps inform choices, it is only one of many values and interests considered by each stakeholder. In response to this emerging challenge, scientists, and science agencies such as the U.S. Geologi 11.941 and 11.942 make up a one-year seminar. The goal of this seminar is to explore the role of science and scientists in ecosystems and natural resources management focusing on joint fact finding as a new approach to environmental policy-making. Increasingly scientists and science organizations are confronting a conundrum: Why is science often ignored in important societal decisions even as the call for decisions based on sound science escalates? One reason is that decision-making is often driven by a variety of nonscientific, adversarial, and stakeholder dynamics. Thus, even though science helps inform choices, it is only one of many values and interests considered by each stakeholder. In response to this emerging challenge, scientists, and science agencies such as the U.S. Geologi

Subjects

ecosystems | ecosystems | natural resources management | natural resources management | environmental policy-making | environmental policy-making | science organizations | science organizations | science | science | decision-making | decision-making | science agencies | science agencies | U.S. Geological Survey | U.S. Geological Survey | environmental conflicts | environmental conflicts | Cape Wind controversy | Cape Wind controversy | disputes | disputes | joint fact finding | joint fact finding | environmental policy | environmental policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability (MIT) 1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course provides a review of physical, chemical, ecological, and economic principles used to examine interactions between humans and the natural environment. Mass balance concepts are applied to ecology, chemical kinetics, hydrology, and transportation; energy balance concepts are applied to building design, ecology, and climate change; and economic and life cycle concepts are applied to resource evaluation and engineering design. Numerical models are used to integrate concepts and to assess environmental impacts of human activities. Problem sets involve development of MATLAB® models for particular engineering applications. Some experience with computer programming is helpful but not essential. This course provides a review of physical, chemical, ecological, and economic principles used to examine interactions between humans and the natural environment. Mass balance concepts are applied to ecology, chemical kinetics, hydrology, and transportation; energy balance concepts are applied to building design, ecology, and climate change; and economic and life cycle concepts are applied to resource evaluation and engineering design. Numerical models are used to integrate concepts and to assess environmental impacts of human activities. Problem sets involve development of MATLAB® models for particular engineering applications. Some experience with computer programming is helpful but not essential.

Subjects

modeling | modeling | matlab | matlab | human impact on environment | human impact on environment | economics | economics | natural resources | natural resources | assessment of model predictions | assessment of model predictions | mass balance | mass balance | energy balance | energy balance | mass transport | mass transport | energy transport | energy transport | resource economics | resource economics | life cycle analysis | life cycle analysis | chemical kinetics | chemical kinetics | population modeling | population modeling | pesticides | pesticides | nutrients | nutrients | building energy | building energy | air quality | air quality | crop irrigation | crop irrigation | groundwater | groundwater

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.964 Economics of Marine Transportation Industries (MIT) 2.964 Economics of Marine Transportation Industries (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course studies the economics of the principal markets related to marine transportation, environment, and natural resources. Topics include structures of the markets and industries involved; competition; impacts of policies and regulations. The course analyzes the relationship among industries, markets, technologies, and national policies, and introduces the concepts of national income accounts, sustainability, and intergenerational equity and their relationship to current economic practice. This half-semester course studies the economics of the principal markets related to marine transportation, environment, and natural resources. Topics include structures of the markets and industries involved; competition; impacts of policies and regulations. The course analyzes the relationship among industries, markets, technologies, and national policies, and introduces the concepts of national income accounts, sustainability, and intergenerational equity and their relationship to current economic practice.

Subjects

Ships | Ships | shipping | shipping | boat | boat | container ships | container ships | ports | ports | docks | docks | LNG | LNG | transportation | transportation | tanker | tanker | supertanker | supertanker | ferry | ferry | ferries | ferries | FPSO | FPSO | fast ferry | fast ferry | catamaran | catamaran | monohull | monohull | oil spill | oil spill | natural resources | natural resources | energy supply | energy supply | trade | trade | globalization | globalization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.959 Reforming Natural Resources Governance: Failings of Scientific Rationalism and Alternatives for Building Common Ground (MIT) 11.959 Reforming Natural Resources Governance: Failings of Scientific Rationalism and Alternatives for Building Common Ground (MIT)

Description

For the last century, precepts of scientific management and administrative rationality have concentrated power in the hands of technical specialists, which in recent decades has contributed to widespread disenfranchisement and discontent among stakeholders in natural resources cases. In this seminar we examine the limitations of scientific management as a model both for governance and for gathering and using information, and describe alternative methods for informing and organizing decision-making processes. We feature cases involving large carnivores in the West (mountain lions and grizzly bears), Northeast coastal fisheries, and adaptive management of the Colorado River. There will be nightly readings and a short written assignment. For the last century, precepts of scientific management and administrative rationality have concentrated power in the hands of technical specialists, which in recent decades has contributed to widespread disenfranchisement and discontent among stakeholders in natural resources cases. In this seminar we examine the limitations of scientific management as a model both for governance and for gathering and using information, and describe alternative methods for informing and organizing decision-making processes. We feature cases involving large carnivores in the West (mountain lions and grizzly bears), Northeast coastal fisheries, and adaptive management of the Colorado River. There will be nightly readings and a short written assignment.

Subjects

role-play simulation | role-play simulation | policymakers | policymakers | Cape Wind controversy | Cape Wind controversy | wind farms | wind farms | wind farm | wind farm | ecosystems | ecosystems | natural resources management | natural resources management | environmental policy-making | environmental policy-making | science organizations | science organizations | science | science | decision-making | decision-making | science agencies | science agencies | National Environmental Policy Act | National Environmental Policy Act | NEPA | NEPA | scientists | scientists | society | society | collaborative approaches | collaborative approaches | joint fact finding | joint fact finding | environment | environment | policy making | policy making | decision making | decision making | ethics in science | ethics in science | values | values | environmental policy | environmental policy | collaborative learning | collaborative learning | local and indigenous knowledge | local and indigenous knowledge | adaptive management | adaptive management | adaptive governance | adaptive governance | eco-system management | eco-system management | USGS | USGS | United States Geological Survey | United States Geological Survey

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.467J Property Rights in Transition (MIT) 11.467J Property Rights in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course examines the theories and policy debates over who can own real property, how to communicate and enforce property rights, and the range of liberties that they confer. It explores alternative economic, political, and sociological perspectives of property rights and their policy and planning implications. This course examines the theories and policy debates over who can own real property, how to communicate and enforce property rights, and the range of liberties that they confer. It explores alternative economic, political, and sociological perspectives of property rights and their policy and planning implications.

Subjects

property | property | property law | property law | international law | international law | ownership | ownership | migration | migration | poverty | poverty | wealth | wealth | power | power | social values | social values | social classes | social classes | regime change | regime change | economics | economics | institutional perspectives | institutional perspectives | real estate | real estate | natural resources | natural resources | sustainability | sustainability | 11.467 | 11.467 | 4.257 | 4.257 | 17.550 | 17.550

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.942 Use of Joint Fact Finding in Science Intensive Policy Disputes, Part II (MIT) 11.942 Use of Joint Fact Finding in Science Intensive Policy Disputes, Part II (MIT)

Description

This course makes up the second half of a year-long seminar on Joint Fact Finding in Science-Intensive Disputes. In 11.941, the first half of the seminar, students analyzed and discussed cases that involved or that should have involved Joint Fact Finding of various kinds. In this portion, students concentrate on gathering information to assist in resolving the Cape Wind project, the dispute concerning the placement of wind farms in waters adjacent to Nantucket. Students will lay the groundwork for a collaborative project that includes Federal and State agencies, academic institutions and non-profits. This course makes up the second half of a year-long seminar on Joint Fact Finding in Science-Intensive Disputes. In 11.941, the first half of the seminar, students analyzed and discussed cases that involved or that should have involved Joint Fact Finding of various kinds. In this portion, students concentrate on gathering information to assist in resolving the Cape Wind project, the dispute concerning the placement of wind farms in waters adjacent to Nantucket. Students will lay the groundwork for a collaborative project that includes Federal and State agencies, academic institutions and non-profits.

Subjects

role-play simulation | role-play simulation | policymakers | policymakers | Cape Wind controversy | Cape Wind controversy | wind farms | wind farms | windfarm | windfarm | ecosystems | ecosystems | natural resources management | natural resources management | environmental policy-making | environmental policy-making | science organizations | science organizations | science | science | decision-making | decision-making | science agencies | science agencies | National Environmental Policy Act | National Environmental Policy Act | NEPA | NEPA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.012 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT) 15.012 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT)

Description

15.012 Applied Macro- and International Economics uses case studies to investigate the macroeconomic environment in which firms operate. The first half of the course develops the basic tools of macroeconomic management: monetary, fiscal, and exchange rate policy. The class discusses recent emerging market and financial crises by examining their causes and considering how best to address them and prevent them from recurring in the future. The second half evaluates different strategies of economic development. Topics covered in the second half of this course include growth, the role of debt and foreign aid, and the reliance on natural resources. 15.012 Applied Macro- and International Economics uses case studies to investigate the macroeconomic environment in which firms operate. The first half of the course develops the basic tools of macroeconomic management: monetary, fiscal, and exchange rate policy. The class discusses recent emerging market and financial crises by examining their causes and considering how best to address them and prevent them from recurring in the future. The second half evaluates different strategies of economic development. Topics covered in the second half of this course include growth, the role of debt and foreign aid, and the reliance on natural resources.

Subjects

international economics | international economics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | monetary policy | monetary policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | exchange rate policy | exchange rate policy | financial crisis | financial crisis | emerging market crisis | emerging market crisis | economic development | economic development | foreign aid | foreign aid | natural resources | natural resources

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.036 Technology and Nature in American History (MIT) STS.036 Technology and Nature in American History (MIT)

Description

This course considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, ideologies, and institutions, particularly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Topics include land-use patterns; the changing shape of cities and farms; the redesign of water systems; the construction of roads, dams, bridges, irrigation systems; the creation of national parks; ideas about wilderness; and the role of nature in an industrial world. From small farms to suburbia, Walden Pond to Yosemite, we will ask how technological and natural forces have interacted, and whether there is a place for nature in a technological world. Acknowledgement This class is based on one originally designed and taught by Prof. Deborah Fitzgerald. Her Fall 2004 version can be viewed by This course considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, ideologies, and institutions, particularly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Topics include land-use patterns; the changing shape of cities and farms; the redesign of water systems; the construction of roads, dams, bridges, irrigation systems; the creation of national parks; ideas about wilderness; and the role of nature in an industrial world. From small farms to suburbia, Walden Pond to Yosemite, we will ask how technological and natural forces have interacted, and whether there is a place for nature in a technological world. Acknowledgement This class is based on one originally designed and taught by Prof. Deborah Fitzgerald. Her Fall 2004 version can be viewed by

Subjects

landscape | landscape | technology | technology | nature | nature | wilderness | wilderness | industry | industry | industrial | industrial | commons | commons | America | America | history | history | agriculture | agriculture | systems | systems | conservation | conservation | preservation | preservation | development | development | environment | environment | native American | native American | railroad | railroad | transportation | transportation | aesthetics | aesthetics | colonial history | colonial history | Dust Bowl | Dust Bowl | National Parks | National Parks | water | water | drought | drought | natural resources | natural resources | food | food | materialism | materialism | capitalism | capitalism | organic food | organic food | photography | photography | film | film

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Beyond the Bottom Billion

Description

Prof. Paul Collier discusses the contradiction of resource rich countries with troubled economies, including how the harnessing of natural assets can go wrong, and what can be done to ensure their correct handling.

Subjects

economics | Africa | natural resources | economics | Africa | natural resources | 2009-09-26

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Birth of a drug

Description

The search for new medicinal products is one of the major driving forces behind the development and application of new synthetic methods. This free course focuses on a specific case study that follows the development of a drug for the treatment of high blood pressure. It is a particularly good example of the application of organic chemistry in the pharmaceutical industry

Subjects

Chemistry | natural resources

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course covers the use of ecological and thermodynamic principles to examine interactions between humans and the natural environment. Topics include conservation and constitutive laws, box models, feedback, thermodynamic concepts, energy in natural and engineered systems, basic transport concepts, life cycle analysis and related economic methods.Topics such as renewable energy, sustainable agriculture, green buildings, and mitigation of climate change are illustrated with quantitative case studies. Case studies are team-oriented and may include numerical simulations and design exercises. Some programming experience is desirable but not a prerequisite. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication are provided.

Subjects

systems | conservation laws | constitutive laws | box models | mass conservation | perturbation methods | thermodymanics | heat transfer | enthalpy | entropy | multiphase systems | mass and energy balances | energy supply options | economic value | natural resources | multiobjective analysis | life cycle analysis | mass and energy transport | green buildings | transportation modeling | renewable energy | climate modeling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.183 Sustainable Design and Technology Research Workshop (MIT)

Description

This workshop investigates the current state of sustainability in regards to architecture, from the level of the tectonic detail to the urban environment. Current research and case studies will be investigated, and students will propose their own solutions as part of the final project.

Subjects

sustainable design | built environment | green design and technology | urbanism | tectonics | materials | sustainability | ecology | energy | solar gain | fossil fuels | natural resources | renewable energy | modern design | green design | technology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course provides a review of physical, chemical, ecological, and economic principles used to examine interactions between humans and the natural environment. Mass balance concepts are applied to ecology, chemical kinetics, hydrology, and transportation; energy balance concepts are applied to building design, ecology, and climate change; and economic and life cycle concepts are applied to resource evaluation and engineering design. Numerical models are used to integrate concepts and to assess environmental impacts of human activities. Problem sets involve development of MATLAB® models for particular engineering applications. Some experience with computer programming is helpful but not essential.

Subjects

modeling | matlab | human impact on environment | economics | natural resources | assessment of model predictions | mass balance | energy balance | mass transport | energy transport | resource economics | life cycle analysis | chemical kinetics | population modeling | pesticides | nutrients | building energy | air quality | crop irrigation | groundwater

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.964 Economics of Marine Transportation Industries (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course studies the economics of the principal markets related to marine transportation, environment, and natural resources. Topics include structures of the markets and industries involved; competition; impacts of policies and regulations. The course analyzes the relationship among industries, markets, technologies, and national policies, and introduces the concepts of national income accounts, sustainability, and intergenerational equity and their relationship to current economic practice.

Subjects

Ships | shipping | boat | container ships | ports | docks | LNG | transportation | tanker | supertanker | ferry | ferries | FPSO | fast ferry | catamaran | monohull | oil spill | natural resources | energy supply | trade | globalization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.012 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT)

Description

15.012 Applied Macro- and International Economics uses case studies to investigate the macroeconomic environment in which firms operate. The first half of the course develops the basic tools of macroeconomic management: monetary, fiscal, and exchange rate policy. The class discusses recent emerging market and financial crises by examining their causes and considering how best to address them and prevent them from recurring in the future. The second half evaluates different strategies of economic development. Topics covered in the second half of this course include growth, the role of debt and foreign aid, and the reliance on natural resources.

Subjects

international economics | macroeconomics | monetary policy | fiscal policy | exchange rate policy | financial crisis | emerging market crisis | economic development | foreign aid | natural resources

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.036 Technology and Nature in American History (MIT)

Description

This course considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, ideologies, and institutions, particularly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Topics include land-use patterns; the changing shape of cities and farms; the redesign of water systems; the construction of roads, dams, bridges, irrigation systems; the creation of national parks; ideas about wilderness; and the role of nature in an industrial world. From small farms to suburbia, Walden Pond to Yosemite, we will ask how technological and natural forces have interacted, and whether there is a place for nature in a technological world. Acknowledgement This class is based on one originally designed and taught by Prof. Deborah Fitzgerald. Her Fall 2004 version can be viewed by

Subjects

landscape | technology | nature | wilderness | industry | industrial | commons | America | history | agriculture | systems | conservation | preservation | development | environment | native American | railroad | transportation | aesthetics | colonial history | Dust Bowl | National Parks | water | drought | natural resources | food | materialism | capitalism | organic food | photography | film

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.959 Reforming Natural Resources Governance: Failings of Scientific Rationalism and Alternatives for Building Common Ground (MIT)

Description

For the last century, precepts of scientific management and administrative rationality have concentrated power in the hands of technical specialists, which in recent decades has contributed to widespread disenfranchisement and discontent among stakeholders in natural resources cases. In this seminar we examine the limitations of scientific management as a model both for governance and for gathering and using information, and describe alternative methods for informing and organizing decision-making processes. We feature cases involving large carnivores in the West (mountain lions and grizzly bears), Northeast coastal fisheries, and adaptive management of the Colorado River. There will be nightly readings and a short written assignment.

Subjects

role-play simulation | policymakers | Cape Wind controversy | wind farms | wind farm | ecosystems | natural resources management | environmental policy-making | science organizations | science | decision-making | science agencies | National Environmental Policy Act | NEPA | scientists | society | collaborative approaches | joint fact finding | environment | policy making | decision making | ethics in science | values | environmental policy | collaborative learning | local and indigenous knowledge | adaptive management | adaptive governance | eco-system management | USGS | United States Geological Survey

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.467J Property Rights in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course examines the theories and policy debates over who can own real property, how to communicate and enforce property rights, and the range of liberties that they confer. It explores alternative economic, political, and sociological perspectives of property rights and their policy and planning implications.

Subjects

property | property law | international law | ownership | migration | poverty | wealth | power | social values | social classes | regime change | economics | institutional perspectives | real estate | natural resources | sustainability | 11.467 | 4.257 | 17.550

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.941 Use of Joint Fact Finding in Science Intensive Policy Disputes, Part I (MIT)

Description

11.941 and 11.942 make up a one-year seminar. The goal of this seminar is to explore the role of science and scientists in ecosystems and natural resources management focusing on joint fact finding as a new approach to environmental policy-making. Increasingly scientists and science organizations are confronting a conundrum: Why is science often ignored in important societal decisions even as the call for decisions based on sound science escalates? One reason is that decision-making is often driven by a variety of nonscientific, adversarial, and stakeholder dynamics. Thus, even though science helps inform choices, it is only one of many values and interests considered by each stakeholder. In response to this emerging challenge, scientists, and science agencies such as the U.S. Geologi

Subjects

ecosystems | natural resources management | environmental policy-making | science organizations | science | decision-making | science agencies | U.S. Geological Survey | environmental conflicts | Cape Wind controversy | disputes | joint fact finding | environmental policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.942 Use of Joint Fact Finding in Science Intensive Policy Disputes, Part II (MIT)

Description

This course makes up the second half of a year-long seminar on Joint Fact Finding in Science-Intensive Disputes. In 11.941, the first half of the seminar, students analyzed and discussed cases that involved or that should have involved Joint Fact Finding of various kinds. In this portion, students concentrate on gathering information to assist in resolving the Cape Wind project, the dispute concerning the placement of wind farms in waters adjacent to Nantucket. Students will lay the groundwork for a collaborative project that includes Federal and State agencies, academic institutions and non-profits.

Subjects

role-play simulation | policymakers | Cape Wind controversy | wind farms | windfarm | ecosystems | natural resources management | environmental policy-making | science organizations | science | decision-making | science agencies | National Environmental Policy Act | NEPA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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