Searching for nature : 346 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT) 21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert. This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | writing | science | science | technology | technology | communications | communications | medicine | medicine | public | public | public interest | public interest | science in the public interest | science in the public interest | education | education | literacy | literacy | science literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature | nature writing | nature writing | craft | craft | process | process | scientists | scientists | news | news | article | article | essay | essay | write | write | read | read | composition | composition | revise | revise | revision | revision | rewrite | rewrite | archive | archive | archival | archival | history | history | history of science | history of science | history of technology | history of technology | history of medicine | history of medicine | history of nature | history of nature | nature of history | nature of history | nature of technology | nature of technology | technological history | technological history | medical history | medical history | science of history | science of history | writing history | writing history | history of writing | history of writing | writing history of history of science | writing history of history of science | interview | interview | interviewing | interviewing | publish | publish | publishing | publishing | teaching writing | teaching writing | writing teaching | writing teaching | book | book | book review | book review | writing book review | writing book review | discussion | discussion | draft | draft | drafting | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT) 24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT)

Description

In this introductory course on the philosophy of language, we examine views on the nature of meaning, reference, truth, and their relationships. Other topics may include relationships between language and logic, language and knowledge, language and reality, language and acts performed through its use. No knowledge of logic or linguistics presupposed. In this introductory course on the philosophy of language, we examine views on the nature of meaning, reference, truth, and their relationships. Other topics may include relationships between language and logic, language and knowledge, language and reality, language and acts performed through its use. No knowledge of logic or linguistics presupposed.

Subjects

philosophy of language | philosophy of language | nature of meaning | nature of meaning | nature of reference | nature of reference | nature of truth | nature of truth | language and logic | language and logic | language and knowledge | language and knowledge | language and reality | language and reality | language and acts performed through its use | language and acts performed through its use

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-24.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT) 6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment. 6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | network | computer security | computer security | security | security | cryptography | cryptography | secret-key | secret-key | public-key | public-key | digital signature | digital signature | authentication | authentication | identification | identification | intrusion detection | intrusion detection | virus | virus | operating system | operating system | software | software | protection | protection | electronic mail | electronic mail | email | email | electronic commerce | electronic commerce | electronic cash | electronic cash | firewall | firewall | computer | computer | digital | digital | signature | signature | electronic | electronic | cash | cash | commerce | commerce | mail | mail | operating | operating | system | system | intrustion | intrustion | detection | detection | distributed | distributed | physical | physical | discretionary | discretionary | mandatory | mandatory | access | access | control | control | biometrics | biometrics | information | information | flow | flow | models | models | covert | covert | channels | channels | integrity | integrity | logic | logic | voting | voting | risk | risk | assessment | assessment | secure | secure | web | web | browsers | browsers | architecture | architecture | engineering | engineering | certificates | certificates | multi-user computer systems | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | physical security | discretionary access control | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | information-flow models | covert channels | covert channels | integrity models | integrity models | elementary cryptography | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | viruses | firewalls | firewalls | electronic voting | electronic voting | risk assessment | risk assessment | secure web browsers | secure web browsers | network security | network security | architecture engineering | architecture engineering | digital signatures | digital signatures | authentication schemes | authentication schemes | identification schemes | identification schemes | formal models | formal models | secure operating systems | secure operating systems | software protection | software protection | electronic mail security | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | World Wide Web | ecommerce | ecommerce | email security | email security | www | www | payment protocols | payment protocols | authentication logic | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | science | technology | communications | medicine | public | public interest | science in the public interest | education | literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature writing | craft | process | scientists | news | article | essay | write | read | composition | revise | revision | rewrite | archive | archival | history | history of science | history of technology | history of medicine | history of nature | nature of history | nature of technology | technological history | medical history | science of history | writing history | history of writing | writing history of history of science | interview | interviewing | publish | publishing | teaching writing | writing teaching | book | book review | writing book review | discussion | draft | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | science | technology | communications | medicine | public | public interest | science in the public interest | education | literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature writing | craft | process | scientists | news | article | essay | write | read | composition | revise | revision | rewrite | archive | archival | history | history of science | history of technology | history of medicine | history of nature | nature of history | nature of technology | technological history | medical history | science of history | writing history | history of writing | writing history of history of science | interview | interviewing | publish | publishing | teaching writing | writing teaching | book | book review | writing book review | discussion | draft | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.217 Anthropology of War and Peace (MIT) 21A.217 Anthropology of War and Peace (MIT)

Description

This class has been reorganized to focus primarily on the War in Iraq. As in previous years, the class still examines war in cross-cultural perspective, asking whether war is intrinsic to human nature, what causes war, how particular cultural experiences of war differ, and how war has affected American culture. This class has been reorganized to focus primarily on the War in Iraq. As in previous years, the class still examines war in cross-cultural perspective, asking whether war is intrinsic to human nature, what causes war, how particular cultural experiences of war differ, and how war has affected American culture.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | war | war | peace | peace | f humans are by nature warlike | f humans are by nature warlike | the evolution of war in cross-cultural perspective | the evolution of war in cross-cultural perspective | the socialization of warriors and the construction of enemies | the socialization of warriors and the construction of enemies | the recent emergence of anti-war movements | the recent emergence of anti-war movements | sociobiological and other theories of war | sociobiological and other theories of war | ethnic hatred and civil war in Rwanda | ethnic hatred and civil war in Rwanda | Bosnia | Bosnia | and Northern Ireland | and Northern Ireland | military culture in the U.S. and elsewhere | military culture in the U.S. and elsewhere | peace movements | peace movements | studies of military conversion | studies of military conversion | Northern Ireland | Northern Ireland | humans are by nature warlike | humans are by nature warlike

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT) 21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT)

Description

The science essay uses science to think about the human condition; it uses humanistic thinking to reflect on the possibilities and limits of science and technology. In this class we read and practice writing science essays of varied lengths and purposes. We will read a wide variety of science essays, ranging across disciplines, both to learn more about this genre and to inspire your own writing. This semester's reading centers on "The Dark Side," with essays ranging from Alan Lightman's "Prisoner of the Wired World" through Robin Marantz Henig's cautionary account of nano-technology ("Our Silver-Coated Future") to David Quammen's investigation of diseases that jump from animals to humans ("Deadly Contact"). The science essay uses science to think about the human condition; it uses humanistic thinking to reflect on the possibilities and limits of science and technology. In this class we read and practice writing science essays of varied lengths and purposes. We will read a wide variety of science essays, ranging across disciplines, both to learn more about this genre and to inspire your own writing. This semester's reading centers on "The Dark Side," with essays ranging from Alan Lightman's "Prisoner of the Wired World" through Robin Marantz Henig's cautionary account of nano-technology ("Our Silver-Coated Future") to David Quammen's investigation of diseases that jump from animals to humans ("Deadly Contact").

Subjects

technology | technology | creative non-fiction | creative non-fiction | science writing | science writing | technology and society | technology and society | science technology and society | science technology and society | memoir | memoir | biography | biography | reflection | reflection | popular science | popular science | science literature | science literature | public understanding of science | public understanding of science | policy | policy | debate | debate | journalism | journalism | nature | nature | nature writing | nature writing | ecology | ecology | health | health | medicine | medicine | culture | culture | cultural context | cultural context | mind | mind | matter | matter | scientific | scientific | natural reality | natural reality | virtual | virtual | Darwin | Darwin | life | life | discover | discover | machine | machine | natural history | natural history | reality | reality | educational technology | educational technology | design and experimentation | design and experimentation | education reform | education reform | standards and standardized testing | standards and standardized testing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT) 21W.777 The Science Essay (MIT)

Description

Did Ben Franklin really fly that kite? What are the ethical dimensions of the creation of chimeras—and what should the public know in order to take part in the conversation about them? Is the science of nutrition really science? How did the technology of birth control end up in the delivery system that we know as "the pill"? Is it possible to time travel—and why would scientists even spend time thinking about it? In this class we celebrate, analyze and practice the art of writing about science for the general public. We read and write humanities-style essays about the intersections among science, technology, and life. Students draw on their own interests and ideas to write essays of substance and grace that focus on science and technology. We'll read models of a vari Did Ben Franklin really fly that kite? What are the ethical dimensions of the creation of chimeras—and what should the public know in order to take part in the conversation about them? Is the science of nutrition really science? How did the technology of birth control end up in the delivery system that we know as "the pill"? Is it possible to time travel—and why would scientists even spend time thinking about it? In this class we celebrate, analyze and practice the art of writing about science for the general public. We read and write humanities-style essays about the intersections among science, technology, and life. Students draw on their own interests and ideas to write essays of substance and grace that focus on science and technology. We'll read models of a vari

Subjects

technology | technology | creative non-fiction | creative non-fiction | science writing | science writing | technology and society | technology and society | science technology and society | science technology and society | memoir | memoir | biography | biography | reflection | reflection | popular science | popular science | science literature | science literature | public understanding of science | public understanding of science | policy | policy | debate | debate | journalism | journalism | nature | nature | nature writing | nature writing | ecology | ecology | health | health | medicine | medicine | culture | culture | cultural context | cultural context

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allpersiancourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

6.857 Network and Computer Security (MIT)

Description

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include (but are not limited to) the following: Techniques for achieving security in multi-user computer systems and distributed computer systems; Cryptography: secret-key, public-key, digital signatures; Authentication and identification schemes; Intrusion detection: viruses; Formal models of computer security; Secure operating systems; Software protection; Security of electronic mail and the World Wide Web; Electronic commerce: payment protocols, electronic cash; Firewalls; and Risk assessment.

Subjects

network | computer security | security | cryptography | secret-key | public-key | digital signature | authentication | identification | intrusion detection | virus | operating system | software | protection | electronic mail | email | electronic commerce | electronic cash | firewall | computer | digital | signature | electronic | cash | commerce | mail | operating | system | intrustion | detection | distributed | physical | discretionary | mandatory | access | control | biometrics | information | flow | models | covert | channels | integrity | logic | voting | risk | assessment | secure | web | browsers | architecture | engineering | certificates | multi-user computer systems | distributed computer systems | physical security | discretionary access control | mandatory access control | information-flow models | covert channels | integrity models | elementary cryptography | authentication logic;electronic cash | viruses | firewalls | electronic voting | risk assessment | secure web browsers | network security | architecture engineering | digital signatures | authentication schemes | identification schemes | formal models | secure operating systems | software protection | electronic mail security | World Wide Web | ecommerce | email security | www | payment protocols | authentication logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.251 Introduction to Philosophy of Language (MIT)

Description

In this introductory course on the philosophy of language, we examine views on the nature of meaning, reference, truth, and their relationships. Other topics may include relationships between language and logic, language and knowledge, language and reality, language and acts performed through its use. No knowledge of logic or linguistics presupposed.

Subjects

philosophy of language | nature of meaning | nature of reference | nature of truth | language and logic | language and knowledge | language and reality | language and acts performed through its use

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.00P Introduction to Psychology (MIT) 9.00P Introduction to Psychology (MIT)

Description

A first course in psychology: how we think, see, feel, learn, talk, act, grow, fear, like, love, hate, lust, and interact. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Largely experimental and social psychology, with relevant ideas from biology, philosophy, linguistics, economics, anthropology, and the arts. A first course in psychology: how we think, see, feel, learn, talk, act, grow, fear, like, love, hate, lust, and interact. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Largely experimental and social psychology, with relevant ideas from biology, philosophy, linguistics, economics, anthropology, and the arts.

Subjects

psychology | psychology | think | think | see | see | feel | feel | learn | learn | talk | talk | act | act | grow | grow | fear | fear | like | like | love | love | hate | hate | lust | lust | interact | interact | nature and nurture | nature and nurture | free will | free will | consciousness | consciousness | human differences | human differences | self | self | society | society | social psychology | social psychology | biology | biology | philosophy | philosophy | linguistics | linguistics | economics | economics | anthropology | anthropology | 9.00 | 9.00

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

12.158 Molecular Biogeochemistry (MIT) 12.158 Molecular Biogeochemistry (MIT)

Description

This course covers all aspects of molecular biosignatures, such as their pathways of lipid biosynthesis, the distribution patterns of lipid biosynthetic pathways with regard to phylogeny and physiology, isotopic contents, occurrence in modern organisms and environments, diagenetic pathways, analytical techniques and the occurrence of molecular fossils through the geological record. Students analyze in depth the recent literature on chemical fossils. Lectures provide background on the subject matter. Basic knowledge of organic chemistry required. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. This course covers all aspects of molecular biosignatures, such as their pathways of lipid biosynthesis, the distribution patterns of lipid biosynthetic pathways with regard to phylogeny and physiology, isotopic contents, occurrence in modern organisms and environments, diagenetic pathways, analytical techniques and the occurrence of molecular fossils through the geological record. Students analyze in depth the recent literature on chemical fossils. Lectures provide background on the subject matter. Basic knowledge of organic chemistry required. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

Subjects

molecular biogeochemistry | molecular biogeochemistry | biosynthesis | biosynthesis | phylogenetic origins | phylogenetic origins | acetogenic lipids | acetogenic lipids | acylic isoprenoids | acylic isoprenoids | molecular biosugnatures | molecular biosugnatures | steroids | steroids | mass spectrometry | mass spectrometry

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.421 Introduction to Environmental History (MIT) 21H.421 Introduction to Environmental History (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides a historical overview of the interactions between people and their environments. Focusing primarily on the experience of Europeans in the period after Columbus, the subject explores the influence of nature (climate, topography, plants, animals, and microorganisms) on human history and the reciprocal influence of people on nature. Topics include the biological consequences of the European encounter with the Americas, the environmental impact of technology, and the roots of the current environmental crisis. This seminar provides a historical overview of the interactions between people and their environments. Focusing primarily on the experience of Europeans in the period after Columbus, the subject explores the influence of nature (climate, topography, plants, animals, and microorganisms) on human history and the reciprocal influence of people on nature. Topics include the biological consequences of the European encounter with the Americas, the environmental impact of technology, and the roots of the current environmental crisis.

Subjects

environmental history | environmental history | europe | europe | columbus | columbus | climate | climate | topography | topography | nature | nature | plants | plants | animals | animals | microorganisms | microorganisms | human history | human history | americas | americas | technology impact | technology impact | crisis | crisis | wilderness | wilderness | garden | garden | science | science | landscape | landscape | agriculture | agriculture | poison | poison | conservation | conservation | preservation | preservation | demography | demography | industry | industry

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

12.458 Molecular Biogeochemistry (MIT) 12.458 Molecular Biogeochemistry (MIT)

Description

This course evaluates and discusses the formation and diagnostic structural properties of organic compounds with particular emphasis on those molecules which form chemical fossils. The course is structured around the biosynthetic and phylogenetic origins of recalcitrant hydrocarbons. This course evaluates and discusses the formation and diagnostic structural properties of organic compounds with particular emphasis on those molecules which form chemical fossils. The course is structured around the biosynthetic and phylogenetic origins of recalcitrant hydrocarbons.

Subjects

molecular biogeochemistry | molecular biogeochemistry | biosynthesis | biosynthesis | phylogenetic origins | phylogenetic origins | acetogenic lipids | acetogenic lipids | acylic isoprenoids | acylic isoprenoids | molecular biosugnatures | molecular biosugnatures | steroids | steroids | mass spectrometry | mass spectrometry

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.968J Nature, Environment, and Empire (MIT) 21H.968J Nature, Environment, and Empire (MIT)

Description

This course is an exploration of the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and concrete exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This course is an exploration of the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and concrete exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Subjects

History | History | empire | empire | environment | environment | nature | nature | natural history | natural history | domestic | domestic | exotic | exotic | Europeans | Europeans | Americans | Americans | eighteenth | eighteenth | nineteenth centuries | nineteenth centuries | animals | animals | 21H.968 | 21H.968 | STS.415 | STS.415

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.469 Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice. This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice.

Subjects

urban sociology | urban sociology | core writings | core writings | changing nature of community | changing nature of community | social inequality | social inequality | political power | political power | socio-spatial change | socio-spatial change | technological change | technological change | built environment | built environment | human behavior | human behavior | paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship | paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship | urban planning skills and sensibilities | urban planning skills and sensibilities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.036 Industrial Landscapes (MIT) STS.036 Industrial Landscapes (MIT)

Description

What makes a landscape industrial? What makes an industrial site a landscape? This class considers how the development of technology in America intersected with the natural world, in some cases reshaping its contours and meanings, and in other cases getting redefined by nature's largesse or diminished capacity. The dynamic relationship between these two forces offers many examples of "historical camouflage" in which places and things are not entirely what they seem to be. At this point in history, what things that we see are not industrial in some way? How can we learn the history of places, both obviously industrial like factories, and not so obviously, like supermarkets? Is there a pattern in urban and rural places regarding where things are located, What makes a landscape industrial? What makes an industrial site a landscape? This class considers how the development of technology in America intersected with the natural world, in some cases reshaping its contours and meanings, and in other cases getting redefined by nature's largesse or diminished capacity. The dynamic relationship between these two forces offers many examples of "historical camouflage" in which places and things are not entirely what they seem to be. At this point in history, what things that we see are not industrial in some way? How can we learn the history of places, both obviously industrial like factories, and not so obviously, like supermarkets? Is there a pattern in urban and rural places regarding where things are located,

Subjects

landscape | landscape | technology | technology | nature | nature | wilderness | wilderness | industry | industry | industrial | industrial | commons | commons | america | america | history | history | agriculture | agriculture | systems | systems | conservation | conservation | preservation | preservation | development | development | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21W.775 Writing about Nature and Environmental Issues (MIT) 21W.775 Writing about Nature and Environmental Issues (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on traditional nature writing and the environmentalist essay. Students will keep a web log as a journal. Writings are drawn from the tradition of nature writing and from contemporary forms of the environmentalist essay. This course focuses on traditional nature writing and the environmentalist essay. Students will keep a web log as a journal. Writings are drawn from the tradition of nature writing and from contemporary forms of the environmentalist essay.

Subjects

American nature writing | American nature writing | environmental journalism | environmental journalism | environmentalist essay | environmentalist essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Birds (MIT) 3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Birds (MIT)

Description

Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files on this page. Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files on this page.

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | service learning | service learning | biomimetic research | biomimetic research | Biomimetics | Biomimetics | biology | biology | mimetic | mimetic | physics | physics | nature | nature | natural engineering | natural engineering | wood | wood | trees | trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Trees (MIT) 3.A24 Freshman Seminar: The Engineering of Trees (MIT)

Description

Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? Why are some leaves full of holes? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's& freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy. Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? Why are some leaves full of holes? These are the types of questions Dr. Lorna Gibson's& freshman seminar at MIT has been investigating. We invite you to explore with us.Questions such as these are the subject of biomimetic research. When engineers copy the shapes found in nature we call it Biomimetics. The word biomimic comes from bio, as in biology and mimetic, which means to copy.

Subjects

freshman seminar | freshman seminar | service learning | service learning | biomimetic research | biomimetic research | Biomimetics | Biomimetics | biology | biology | mimetic | mimetic | physics | physics | nature | nature | natural engineering | natural engineering | wood | wood | trees | trees

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.00W Introduction to Psychology (MIT) 9.00W Introduction to Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys questions about human behavior and mental life ranging from how you see to why you fall in love. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Students are exposed to the range of theoretical perspectives including biological, evolutionary, cognitive, and psychoanalytic. One of the best aspects of Psychology is that you are the subject matter. This makes it possible to do many demonstrations in lecture that allow you to experience the topic under study. Lectures work in tandem with the textbook. The course breaks into small recitations sections to allow discussion, oral presentations, and individual contact with instructors. This course surveys questions about human behavior and mental life ranging from how you see to why you fall in love. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Students are exposed to the range of theoretical perspectives including biological, evolutionary, cognitive, and psychoanalytic. One of the best aspects of Psychology is that you are the subject matter. This makes it possible to do many demonstrations in lecture that allow you to experience the topic under study. Lectures work in tandem with the textbook. The course breaks into small recitations sections to allow discussion, oral presentations, and individual contact with instructors.

Subjects

psychology | psychology | think | think | see | see | feel | feel | learn | learn | talk | talk | act | act | grow | grow | fear | fear | like | like | love | love | hate | hate | lust | lust | nature | nature | nurture | nurture | free will | free will | consciousness | consciousness | human differences | human differences | self | self | society | society | social psychology | social psychology | philosophy | philosophy | linguistics | linguistics | economics | economics | anthropology | anthropology | 9.00 | 9.00

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT) 17.000J Political Philosophy: Global Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others. This course explores the foundations and content of norms of justice that apply beyond the borders of a single state. We examine issues of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. Topics include the case for skepticism about global justice; the idea of global democracy; intellectual property rights; the nature of distributive justice at the global level; pluralism and human rights; and rights to control borders. It meets jointly with Harvard's Philosophy 271, and is taught by Professors Joshua Cohen, Thomas Scanlon, and Amartya Sen. Readings are from Kant, Habermas, Rawls, Sen, Beitz, Nussbaum, Stiglitz, Ignatieff, Walzer, among others.

Subjects

norms of justice | norms of justice | interstate | interstate | political justice | political justice | economic justice | economic justice | human rights | human rights | skepticism about global justice | skepticism about global justice | global democracy | global democracy | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | nature of distributive justice | nature of distributive justice | pluralism and human rights | pluralism and human rights | rights to control borders | rights to control borders | Kant | Kant | Habermas | Habermas | Rawls | Rawls | Sen | Sen | Beitz | Beitz | Nussbaum | Nussbaum | Stiglitz | Stiglitz | Ignatieff | Ignatieff | 17.000 | 17.000 | 24.611 | 24.611

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata