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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | brain imaging | brain imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | attention | attention | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT) 14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena. This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect | prospect | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | economics | economics | behavior | behavior | preferences | preferences | cognition | cognition | trust | trust | vengence | vengence | impatience | impatience | impulsivity | impulsivity | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | reinforcement | reinforcement | classical conditioning | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | loss-aversion | over-confidence | over-confidence | self-serving biases | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | equilibrium | rational choice | rational choice | utility maximization | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | game theory | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT) 14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process. This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | heuristics | heuristics | noise | noise | confusion | confusion | competition | competition | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | games | games | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | consumption | hyperbolics | hyperbolics | temptation | temptation | assets | assets | puzzles | puzzles | bubbles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | imaging | imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | impluse | impluse | brain imaging | brain imaging | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | mental focus | mental focus | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | finance | psychology | prospect | prospect theory | bias | probabilistic judgment | self-control | mental accounting | fairness | altruism | public goods | market anomalies | market theories | economics | behavior | preferences | cognition | trust | vengence | impatience | impulsivity | bounded rationality | learning | reinforcement | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | over-confidence | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | rational choice | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | finance | psychology | prospect theory | bias | probabilistic judgment | self-control | mental accounting | fairness | altruism | public goods | market anomalies | market theories | heuristics | noise | confusion | competition | bounded rationality | learning | games | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | hyperbolics | temptation | assets | puzzles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | finance | psychology | prospect | prospect theory | bias | probabilistic judgment | self-control | mental accounting | fairness | altruism | public goods | market anomalies | market theories | economics | behavior | preferences | cognition | trust | vengence | impatience | impulsivity | bounded rationality | learning | reinforcement | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | over-confidence | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | rational choice | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

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14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | finance | psychology | prospect theory | bias | probabilistic judgment | self-control | mental accounting | fairness | altruism | public goods | market anomalies | market theories | heuristics | noise | confusion | competition | bounded rationality | learning | games | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | hyperbolics | temptation | assets | puzzles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | brain imaging | MRI | CT scan | fMRI | brain | mind | morality | moral reasoning | decision making | intelligence | empathy | trust | religion | love | emotion | gender differences | sexuality | stress | prejudice | attention | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | witness | courtroom testimony | addiction | violence | learning | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | imaging | MRI | CT scan | fMRI | brain | mind | impluse | brain imaging | morality | moral reasoning | decision making | intelligence | empathy | trust | religion | love | emotion | gender differences | sexuality | stress | prejudice | mental focus | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | witness | courtroom testimony | addiction | violence | learning | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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