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21L.422 Tragedy (MIT) 21L.422 Tragedy (MIT)

Description

"Tragedy" is a name originally applied to a particular kind of dramatic art and subsequently to other literary forms; it has also been applied to particular events, often implying thereby a particular view of life. Throughout the history of Western literature it has sustained this double reference. Uniquely and insistently, the realm of the tragic encompasses both literature and life.Through careful, critical reading of literary texts, this subject will examine three aspects of the tragic experience:    the scapegoatthe tragic herothe ethical crisisThese aspects of the tragic will be pursued in readings that range in the reference of their materials from the warfare of the ancient world to the experience of the modern extermination camps. "Tragedy" is a name originally applied to a particular kind of dramatic art and subsequently to other literary forms; it has also been applied to particular events, often implying thereby a particular view of life. Throughout the history of Western literature it has sustained this double reference. Uniquely and insistently, the realm of the tragic encompasses both literature and life.Through careful, critical reading of literary texts, this subject will examine three aspects of the tragic experience:    the scapegoatthe tragic herothe ethical crisisThese aspects of the tragic will be pursued in readings that range in the reference of their materials from the warfare of the ancient world to the experience of the modern extermination camps.

Subjects

literature | literature | tragedy | tragedy | western literature | western literature | critcal thought | critcal thought | ethics | ethics | ancient history | ancient history | modern | modern | war | war | sophocles | sophocles | euripides | euripides | plato | plato | shakespeare | shakespeare | balzac | balzac | melville | melville | conrad | conrad | ibsen | ibsen | fitzgerals | fitzgerals | dinesen | dinesen | camus | camus | literary theory | literary theory | nietzsche | nietzsche | coppolla | coppolla | power | power | scapegoat | scapegoat | hero | hero

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002-2 Foundations of Western Culture II: Renaissance to Modernity (MIT) 21L.002-2 Foundations of Western Culture II: Renaissance to Modernity (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the growth of ideas about the nature of mankind's ethical and political life in the West since the renaissance. It will deal with the change in perspective imposed by scientific ideas, the general loss of a supernatural or religious perspective upon human events, and the effects for good or ill of the increasing authority of an intelligence uninformed by religion as a guide to life. The readings are roughly complementary to the readings in 21L001, and classroom discussion will stress appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the cultural heritage of the modern world. This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the growth of ideas about the nature of mankind's ethical and political life in the West since the renaissance. It will deal with the change in perspective imposed by scientific ideas, the general loss of a supernatural or religious perspective upon human events, and the effects for good or ill of the increasing authority of an intelligence uninformed by religion as a guide to life. The readings are roughly complementary to the readings in 21L001, and classroom discussion will stress appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the cultural heritage of the modern world.

Subjects

literature | literature | culture | culture | philosophy | philosophy | ethics | ethics | theory | theory | society | society | politics | politics | religion | religion | science | science | west | west | machiavelli | machiavelli | more | more | swift | swift | hobbes | hobbes | shakespeare | shakespeare | rousseau | rousseau | wordsworth | wordsworth | kant | kant | austen | austen | nietzsche | nietzsche | balzac | balzac | shaw | shaw

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Introduction to Philosophy

Description

This course introduces students to the major topics, problems, and methods of philosophy and surveys the writings of a number of major historical figures in the field. Several of the core areas of philosophy are explored, including metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, ethics, and the philosophy of religion. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Philosophy 101)

Subjects

philosophy | aristotle | descartes | bertrand russell | argument | metaphysics | epistemology | plato | rationalism | locke | empiricism | kant | copernican revolution | enlightenment | daoist | zhuangzi | political | social contract | marx | confucius | virtue | utilitarian | ethics | religion | immortality | nietzsche | buddha | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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21L.422 Tragedy (MIT)

Description

"Tragedy" is a name originally applied to a particular kind of dramatic art and subsequently to other literary forms; it has also been applied to particular events, often implying thereby a particular view of life. Throughout the history of Western literature it has sustained this double reference. Uniquely and insistently, the realm of the tragic encompasses both literature and life.Through careful, critical reading of literary texts, this subject will examine three aspects of the tragic experience:    the scapegoatthe tragic herothe ethical crisisThese aspects of the tragic will be pursued in readings that range in the reference of their materials from the warfare of the ancient world to the experience of the modern extermination camps.

Subjects

literature | tragedy | western literature | critcal thought | ethics | ancient history | modern | war | sophocles | euripides | plato | shakespeare | balzac | melville | conrad | ibsen | fitzgerals | dinesen | camus | literary theory | nietzsche | coppolla | power | scapegoat | hero

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002-2 Foundations of Western Culture II: Renaissance to Modernity (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the growth of ideas about the nature of mankind's ethical and political life in the West since the renaissance. It will deal with the change in perspective imposed by scientific ideas, the general loss of a supernatural or religious perspective upon human events, and the effects for good or ill of the increasing authority of an intelligence uninformed by religion as a guide to life. The readings are roughly complementary to the readings in 21L001, and classroom discussion will stress appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the cultural heritage of the modern world.

Subjects

literature | culture | philosophy | ethics | theory | society | politics | religion | science | west | machiavelli | more | swift | hobbes | shakespeare | rousseau | wordsworth | kant | austen | nietzsche | balzac | shaw

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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