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Keynote Speech

Description

Terry Davis, former Secretary General of the Council of Europe, gives the final keynote speech for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective conference. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

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- A Dual Agenda

Description

Professor Richard Caplan, Oxford, gives a talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at home'? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

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From Conditionality to Disconnection-The Ambivalent Relationship between the Council of Europe and the European Union in the Field of Criminal Justice

Description

Professor Valsamis Mitsilegas, School of Law, Queen Mary, University of London gives a talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their gover Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

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Hard Law, Soft Law and the Politics of Standards: Regulating Political Parties in Europe

Description

Dr Daniel Smilov, University of Sofia, gives a talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at home'? It Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities: From Standard-Setting to Standard-Implementation

Description

Professor Rainer Hoffmann, University of Frankfurt gives a talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Council of Europe and the death penalty: intergovernmental legitimation as enabling and constraining

Description

Dr Kundai Sithole, Oxford, gives the seventh talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at home'? It w Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Sixty Years of Normative Production in the Council of Europe: The Legal Nature, Elaboration, Challenges and Trends of the CoE Conventions

Description

Manuel Lezertua, Director of Legal Advice and Public International Law (Jurisconsult), Council of Europe: gives the sixth talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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s Norm Entrepreneurship

Description

Dr Gwendolyn Sasse, Oxford, gives the fifth talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at home'? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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War, Law and the Cold War: Making the European Convention on Human Rights

Description

Professor Anne Deighton (Oxford) gives the fourth talk in The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at home'? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT) 14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations of policy making in developing countries. The goal is to spell out various policy options and to quantify the trade-offs between them. We will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. This is an empirical class. For each topic, we will study several concrete examples chosen from around the world. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or non-governmental organizations (NGOs))? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful? This course explores the foundations of policy making in developing countries. The goal is to spell out various policy options and to quantify the trade-offs between them. We will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. This is an empirical class. For each topic, we will study several concrete examples chosen from around the world. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or non-governmental organizations (NGOs))? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful?

Subjects

Economics | Economics | development | development | policy | policy | human | human | education | education | health | health | gender | gender | family | family | land | land | relations | relations | risk | risk | informal | informal | formal | formal | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | decisions | decisions | poor | poor | households | households | countries | countries | government | government | international | international | organizations | organizations | Non-governmental organizations | Non-governmental organizations | NGOs | NGOs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Where do norms come from?

Description

Dr Jennifer Jackson-Preece (LSE) gives the second talk for The Evolution of International Norms and Norm Entrepreneurship: The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their governments may try to avoid 'at home'? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | europe | human rights | socio-legal | norm entrepreneurship | norms | law | 2012-01-11

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Norm Entrepreneurship - Theoretical and Methodological Challenges

Description

Professor Jeffrey Checkel (Simon Fraser University, Vancouver), gives the first talk in The Evolution of International Norms and 'Norm Entrepreneurship' The Council of Europe in Comparative Perspective workshop. This one-day workshop will bring together officials and researchers working on the Council of Europe and international norms more generally. Our emphasis on the Council of Europe gives a concrete empirical starting point for consideration of international norms, norm 'entrepreneurship', and human rights. How do norms come onto the international political agenda? How are they turned into political or legal instruments? Who are the norm 'entrepreneurs'? Why do member states risk becoming entangled in an international normative and legal discourse about human rights that their g Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

norms | norm entrepreneurship | socio-legal | law | europe | norms | norm entrepreneurship | socio-legal | law | europe | 2012-01-11

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18.769 Topics in Lie Theory: Tensor Categories (MIT) 18.769 Topics in Lie Theory: Tensor Categories (MIT)

Description

This course will give a detailed introduction to the theory of tensor categories and review some of its connections to other subjects (with a focus on representation-theoretic applications). In particular, we will discuss categorifications of such notions from ring theory as: module, morphism of modules, Morita equivalence of rings, commutative ring, the center of a ring, the centralizer of a subring, the double centralizer property, graded ring, etc. This course will give a detailed introduction to the theory of tensor categories and review some of its connections to other subjects (with a focus on representation-theoretic applications). In particular, we will discuss categorifications of such notions from ring theory as: module, morphism of modules, Morita equivalence of rings, commutative ring, the center of a ring, the centralizer of a subring, the double centralizer property, graded ring, etc.

Subjects

monoidal functors | monoidal functors | tensor | tensor | pivotal | pivotal | spherical | spherical | MacLane's | MacLane's | Grthendieck | Grthendieck | module categories | module categories | braided tensor | braided tensor | Muger centralizer | Muger centralizer | symmetric categories | symmetric categories | deligne's theorem | deligne's theorem | radford formula | radford formula | squared norms | squared norms | global dimensions | global dimensions | cohomology | cohomology | oceanu ridigity | oceanu ridigity | robenius-perron | robenius-perron | lifting theory | lifting theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT) 21G.019 Communicating Across Cultures (MIT)

Description

It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts - or for that matter, people - we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries."Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary

Subjects

Cross-cultural | Cross-cultural | business | business | science | science | technology | technology | communication styles | communication styles | communication techniques | communication techniques | cultural norms | cultural norms | tradition | tradition | communication | communication | culture | culture | verbal communication | verbal communication | non-verbal communication | non-verbal communication | intercultural communication | intercultural communication | argumentation | argumentation | negotiation | negotiation | conflict resolution | conflict resolution | intercultural adjustment | intercultural adjustment | Asian culture | Asian culture | European culture | European culture | 21F.019 | 21F.019 | 21F.021 | 21F.021

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.810 Topics in Philosophy of Science: Social Science (MIT) 24.810 Topics in Philosophy of Science: Social Science (MIT)

Description

This course offers an advanced survey of current debates about the ontology, methodology, and aims of the social sciences. This course offers an advanced survey of current debates about the ontology, methodology, and aims of the social sciences.

Subjects

Ontology | Ontology | methodology | methodology | social science | social science | human being | human being | human behavior | human behavior | social structure | social structure | practices | practices | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | individual | individual | society | society | mental state | mental state | values | values | theory | theory | objectivity | objectivity | reductionism | reductionism | individualism | individualism | holism | holism | prediction | prediction | laws | laws | explanation | explanation | rational choice | rational choice | functional | functional

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.03 Relativism, Reason, and Reality (MIT) 24.03 Relativism, Reason, and Reality (MIT)

Description

Are moral standards relative to cultures and/or moral frameworks? Are there incompatible or non-comparable ways of thinking about the world that are somehow equally good? Is science getting closer to the truth? Is rationality--the notion of a good reason to believe something--relative to cultural norms? What are selves? Is there a coherent form of relativism about the self? Guided by the writings of Thomas Kuhn, Gilbert Harman, Judith Thomson, John Perry and Derek Parfit, we attempt to make these vague questions precise, and we make a start at answering them. Are moral standards relative to cultures and/or moral frameworks? Are there incompatible or non-comparable ways of thinking about the world that are somehow equally good? Is science getting closer to the truth? Is rationality--the notion of a good reason to believe something--relative to cultural norms? What are selves? Is there a coherent form of relativism about the self? Guided by the writings of Thomas Kuhn, Gilbert Harman, Judith Thomson, John Perry and Derek Parfit, we attempt to make these vague questions precise, and we make a start at answering them.

Subjects

relativism | relativism | moral standards | moral standards | science | science | truth | truth | rationality | rationality | cultural norms | cultural norms | Thomas Kuhn | Thomas Kuhn | Karl Popper | Karl Popper | Gilbert Harman | Gilbert Harman | Judith Thomson | Judith Thomson | Derek Parfit | Derek Parfit

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | drama | forbidden plays | forbidden plays | Modern America | Modern America | decision alley | decision alley | drama strategies | drama strategies | drama skills | drama skills | purchasing institution | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activity | drama activities | drama activities | writing opportunity | writing opportunity | last wolf | last wolf | learning medium | learning medium | literacy activities | literacy activities | writing opportunities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | foundation stage | assessment focus | assessment focus | two long lines | two long lines | dramatic activity | dramatic activity | action conventions | action conventions | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre | theatre | censorship | censorship | blacklist | blacklist | banned | banned | obscenity | obscenity | architecture | architecture | selective realism | selective realism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Social mobility, marriage and societal openness in Great Britain, 1949-2006

Description

How can we understand the social mobility patterns through marriage in Great Britain? A historical perspective. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

social norms | Great Britain | marriage | societal openness | social mobility | social norms | Great Britain | marriage | societal openness | social mobility

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT) 14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or NGOs)? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful? In this course, we will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or NGOs)? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful?

Subjects

Economics | Economics | development | development | policy | policy | human | human | education | education | health | health | gender | gender | family | family | land | land | relations | relations | risk | risk | informal | informal | formal | formal | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | decisions | decisions | poor | poor | households | households | countries | countries | government | government | international | international | organizations | organizations | Non-governmental organizations | Non-governmental organizations | NGOs | NGOs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances. Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater. | theater.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Social mobility, marriage and societal openness in Great Britain, 1949-2006

Description

How can we understand the social mobility patterns through marriage in Great Britain? A historical perspective. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

social norms | Great Britain | marriage | societal openness | social mobility | social norms | Great Britain | marriage | societal openness | social mobility

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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15.301 Managerial Psychology Laboratory (MIT) 15.301 Managerial Psychology Laboratory (MIT)

Description

We function in our personal and professional lives based on knowledge and intuitions. Our intuition that we know a lot is very powerful. But sometimes intuitions are accurate and sometimes they are not; without research, it is hard to tell. This course combines a few different goals: develop a critical eye for making inferences from data; be able to carry out simple data analysis; learn about managerial psychology; develop interesting new questions about managerial psychology and test these questions. We function in our personal and professional lives based on knowledge and intuitions. Our intuition that we know a lot is very powerful. But sometimes intuitions are accurate and sometimes they are not; without research, it is hard to tell. This course combines a few different goals: develop a critical eye for making inferences from data; be able to carry out simple data analysis; learn about managerial psychology; develop interesting new questions about managerial psychology and test these questions.

Subjects

psychology | psychology | group dynamics | group dynamics | motivation | motivation | reward system | reward system | incentive | incentive | norms | norms | creativity | creativity | decision making | decision making | leadership | leadership | career development | career development | organization | organization | mentor | mentor | communication | communication | management | management | business | business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.310 Managerial Psychology Laboratory (MIT) 15.310 Managerial Psychology Laboratory (MIT)

Description

Surveys social psychology and organization theory interpreted in the context of the managerial environment. Shares lectures with 15.301, with a separate recitation required. 15.301 is intended primarily for non-Sloan students, both graduate and undergraduate. Deals with a number of diverse subjects, including motivation and reward systems for engineers and scientists in industry; the aging of technical groups; the management of R&D matrix organizations; and the architecture of R&D laboratories and its effect on communication patterns in the organization. 15.301 is a core subject for students majoring in management science. A laboratory is a required element of the course for these students. It involves projects of an applied nature in behavioral science. Emphasizes use of behaviora Surveys social psychology and organization theory interpreted in the context of the managerial environment. Shares lectures with 15.301, with a separate recitation required. 15.301 is intended primarily for non-Sloan students, both graduate and undergraduate. Deals with a number of diverse subjects, including motivation and reward systems for engineers and scientists in industry; the aging of technical groups; the management of R&D matrix organizations; and the architecture of R&D laboratories and its effect on communication patterns in the organization. 15.301 is a core subject for students majoring in management science. A laboratory is a required element of the course for these students. It involves projects of an applied nature in behavioral science. Emphasizes use of behaviora

Subjects

Psychology | Psychology | Group dynamics | Group dynamics | Motivation | Motivation | Reward system incentive | Reward system incentive | Incentive | Incentive | Norms | Norms | Creativity | Creativity | Decision making | Decision making | Leadership | Leadership | Career development | Career development | Organization | Organization | Mentor | Mentor | Communication | Communication | Management | Management | Business | Business | business | business | career development | career development | communication | communication | creativity | creativity | decision making | decision making | group dynamics | group dynamics | incentive | incentive | leadership | leadership | management | management | mentor | mentor | reward system incentive | reward system incentive | psychology | psychology | organization | organization | norms | norms | motivation | motivation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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