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21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT)

Description

Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl

Subjects

British Romanticism | British Romanticism | prose | prose | fiction | fiction | novel | novel | social/philosophical problem novels | social/philosophical problem novels | sentiment | sentiment | sensibility | sensibility | historical novel | historical novel | French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleonic wars | Napoleonic wars | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | William Godwin | William Godwin | Maria Edgeworth | Maria Edgeworth | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | Walter Scott | Walter Scott

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003-2 Reading Fiction (MIT) 21L.003-2 Reading Fiction (MIT)

Description

Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response. Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response.

Subjects

novel | novel | short story | short story | the city in literature | the city in literature | structure | structure | narrative voice | narrative voice | character development | character development | novelistic experimentation | novelistic experimentation | historical context | historical context | political context | political context | reader response | reader response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Fictionalised politics: how politics and politicians are represented in the US and the UK Fictionalised politics: how politics and politicians are represented in the US and the UK

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module assesses changing attitudes to representative politics in the US and UK, specifically political parties and those who lead them, through their representation in films, plays and novels since the C19th. How formal – party - politics is represented in films, novels, short stories, plays and television (note: in this module these five forms are covered by the term 'fiction') is an exciting and growing area of research. This is especially so in the US, but also (slowly but surely) in the UK. While the study of narrowly defined 'political' novels has a long lineage, it is only during the last decade or so that an interest in fictions expressed on the stage This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module assesses changing attitudes to representative politics in the US and UK, specifically political parties and those who lead them, through their representation in films, plays and novels since the C19th. How formal – party - politics is represented in films, novels, short stories, plays and television (note: in this module these five forms are covered by the term 'fiction') is an exciting and growing area of research. This is especially so in the US, but also (slowly but surely) in the UK. While the study of narrowly defined 'political' novels has a long lineage, it is only during the last decade or so that an interest in fictions expressed on the stage

Subjects

UNow | UNow | M13092 | M13092 | ukoer | ukoer | changing attitudes to representative politics in the US and UK | changing attitudes to representative politics in the US and UK | political parties and those who lead them | political parties and those who lead them | films | plays and novels since the C19th | films | plays and novels since the C19th | political novels | political novels | fictionalised politics | fictionalised politics | formal party politics | formal party politics | US and UK politics | US and UK politics | how politics is represented in the arts | how politics is represented in the arts

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Cultural and Literary Expression in the 18th and 19th Centuries

Description

The period between the Renaissance and the Modern Era is referred to as the “long” 18th and 19th centuries, meaning that they span from around 1680-1830 and 1775-1910 – a time in which so many literary movements and cultural changes took place. In this course, the student will examine these formative cultural and literary developments such as the Enlightenment and Restoration Literature; the Rise of the Novel; Romanticism; and the Victorian Period. The student will identify and contextualize the principal characteristics of each of these movements/developments by reading representative texts. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (English Literature 203)

Subjects

english | english literature | medieval | literature | enlightenment | restoration | modern novel | gothic novel | romanticism | victorian | novel | related subjects | R000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT)

Description

Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl

Subjects

British Romanticism | prose | fiction | novel | social/philosophical problem novels | sentiment | sensibility | historical novel | French Revolution | Napoleonic wars | industrial revolution | William Godwin | Maria Edgeworth | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Walter Scott

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Approaching prose fiction Approaching prose fiction

Description

Do you want to get more out of your reading? This free course, Approaching prose fiction, is designed to develop the analytical skills you need for a more in-depth study of literary texts. You will learn about narrative events and perspectives, the setting of novels, types of characterisation and genre. First published on Fri, 05 Feb 2016 as Approaching prose fiction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Do you want to get more out of your reading? This free course, Approaching prose fiction, is designed to develop the analytical skills you need for a more in-depth study of literary texts. You will learn about narrative events and perspectives, the setting of novels, types of characterisation and genre. First published on Fri, 05 Feb 2016 as Approaching prose fiction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Literature | Literature | art | art | fiction | fiction | novels | novels | A210_2. | A210_2.

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21L.003 Reading Fiction: Imaginary Journeys (MIT) 21L.003 Reading Fiction: Imaginary Journeys (MIT)

Description

Great works of fiction often take us to far-off places; they sometimes conduct us on journeys toward a deeper understanding of what's right next door. We'll read, discuss, and interpret a range of short and short-ish works: The reading list will be chosen from among such texts as "Gilgamesh," Homer's Odyssey (excerpts), Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress (excerpts), Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Saleh's Season of Migration to the North, Woolf's To the Lighthouse, John Cheever's "The Swimmer," Coetzee's The Life and Times of Michael K, Irving's "Rip Van Winkle," Toni Morrison's Jazz, H. G. Wells' The Time Machine, Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Beckett's How It Is, Calvino' Great works of fiction often take us to far-off places; they sometimes conduct us on journeys toward a deeper understanding of what's right next door. We'll read, discuss, and interpret a range of short and short-ish works: The reading list will be chosen from among such texts as "Gilgamesh," Homer's Odyssey (excerpts), Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress (excerpts), Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Saleh's Season of Migration to the North, Woolf's To the Lighthouse, John Cheever's "The Swimmer," Coetzee's The Life and Times of Michael K, Irving's "Rip Van Winkle," Toni Morrison's Jazz, H. G. Wells' The Time Machine, Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Beckett's How It Is, Calvino'

Subjects

Fiction | Fiction | Writing | Writing | literature | literature | novel | novel | reading | reading | imaginary journeys | imaginary journeys | Homer | Homer | Odyssey | Odyssey | Chretien de Troyes | Chretien de Troyes | Arthur | Arthur | Knight of the Cart | Knight of the Cart | Cervantes | Cervantes | Don Quixote | Don Quixote | Jonathan Swift | Jonathan Swift | Gulliver's Travels | Gulliver's Travels | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | Jospeh Conrad | Jospeh Conrad | heart of darkness | heart of darkness | to the lighthouse | to the lighthouse | frankenstein | frankenstein | analytical writing | analytical writing | revision | revision | oral presentation | oral presentation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.501 The American Novel (MIT) 21L.501 The American Novel (MIT)

Description

The theme for this class is "American Revolution." We will read authors who record, on the one hand, the failures of the American revolution, with its dream of democracy and freedom for all, and on the other hand the potential for narrative to reenact that revolution successfully. In different ways, these authors overturn traditional or unethical authority through their literary innovations. Although certain classic American historical, political, and cultural issues will be at the center of our study--democracy, slavery, gender equity, social reform--we will concern ourselves primarily with literary strategies, with language and its uses. Essays will pursue close readings of the texts and develop students' abilities to think creatively and critically about fictional works. The theme for this class is "American Revolution." We will read authors who record, on the one hand, the failures of the American revolution, with its dream of democracy and freedom for all, and on the other hand the potential for narrative to reenact that revolution successfully. In different ways, these authors overturn traditional or unethical authority through their literary innovations. Although certain classic American historical, political, and cultural issues will be at the center of our study--democracy, slavery, gender equity, social reform--we will concern ourselves primarily with literary strategies, with language and its uses. Essays will pursue close readings of the texts and develop students' abilities to think creatively and critically about fictional works.

Subjects

American novel | American novel | democracy | slavery | democracy | slavery | democracy | democracy | slavery | slavery | gender equity | gender equity | social reform | social reform | literary strategies | literary strategies | William Blake | William Blake | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Nathaniel Hawthorne | Nathaniel Hawthorne | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Sarah Orne Jewett | Sarah Orne Jewett | William Faulkner | William Faulkner | Toni Morrison | Toni Morrison

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.260 Women's Novels: A Weekly Book Club (MIT) SP.260 Women's Novels: A Weekly Book Club (MIT)

Description

This pass/fail seminar should be a fun setting where we can all enjoy a love of good books together. Students will read approximately one novel every two weeks, and the class will discuss each novel in a relaxed and interactive setting, with attention to whatever themes and issues interest them most about each book. We will read a wide mixture of classic and contemporary novels written by women, including: Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Toni Morrison, Jazz; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Alice Walker, The Color Purple; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Sheri Reynolds, The Rapture of Canaan; Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; and Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar. Recurrent issues likely to be discussed include: gender, race, and class; romance, love, and marriage; depression and suicide; and c This pass/fail seminar should be a fun setting where we can all enjoy a love of good books together. Students will read approximately one novel every two weeks, and the class will discuss each novel in a relaxed and interactive setting, with attention to whatever themes and issues interest them most about each book. We will read a wide mixture of classic and contemporary novels written by women, including: Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Toni Morrison, Jazz; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Alice Walker, The Color Purple; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Sheri Reynolds, The Rapture of Canaan; Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; and Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar. Recurrent issues likely to be discussed include: gender, race, and class; romance, love, and marriage; depression and suicide; and c

Subjects

women's novels | women's novels | literature | literature | Edith Wharton | Edith Wharton | The House of Mirth | The House of Mirth | Toni Morrison | Toni Morrison | Jazz | Jazz | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | Mrs. Dalloway | Mrs. Dalloway | Alice Walker | Alice Walker | The Color Purple | The Color Purple | Charlotte Bronte | Charlotte Bronte | Jane Eyre | Jane Eyre | Sheri Reynolds | Sheri Reynolds | The Rapture of Canaan | The Rapture of Canaan | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Pride and Prejudice | Pride and Prejudice | Sylvia Plath | Sylvia Plath | The Bell Jar | The Bell Jar | ESG.SP260 | ESG.SP260

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.615 The Middle East in 20th Century (MIT) 21H.615 The Middle East in 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This course explores the 20th-century history of the Middle East, concentrating on the Fertile Crescent, Egypt, Turkey, the Arabian peninsula, and Iran. We will begin by examining the late Ottoman Empire and close with the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Readings will include historical surveys, novels, and primary source documents. This course explores the 20th-century history of the Middle East, concentrating on the Fertile Crescent, Egypt, Turkey, the Arabian peninsula, and Iran. We will begin by examining the late Ottoman Empire and close with the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Readings will include historical surveys, novels, and primary source documents.

Subjects

20th-century history | 20th-century history | Middle East | Middle East | Fertile Crescent | Fertile Crescent | Egypt | Egypt | Turkey | Turkey | Arabian peninsula | Arabian peninsula | Iran | Iran | Ottoman Empire | Ottoman Empire | 9/11 | 9/11 | historical surveys | historical surveys | novels | novels | primary source documents | primary source documents

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Is Tragedy still Alive? (Transcript)

Description

Discussion on whether tragedy still exists in modern culture, whether in films, modern theatre or and other creative arts.

Subjects

history of ideas | literature | modern tragedy | Hardy | Pinter | philosophy | theory of tragedy | greek | #greatwriters | shakespeare | aristotle | society | the novel | comedy | Beckett | history of ideas | literature | modern tragedy | Hardy | Pinter | philosophy | theory of tragedy | greek | #greatwriters | shakespeare | aristotle | society | the novel | comedy | Beckett

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Description

Humanitas Inaugural Keynote Lecture - Athol Fugard: "Defining Moments" - in his life and work. Venue: Simpkins Lee Lecture Theatre, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

screenplay | tsotsi | playwright | south africa | fugard | writing | novel | #greatwriters | film | screenplay | tsotsi | playwright | south africa | fugard | writing | novel | #greatwriters | film | 2010-11-13

License

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21L.003-2 Reading Fiction (MIT)

Description

Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response.

Subjects

novel | short story | the city in literature | structure | narrative voice | character development | novelistic experimentation | historical context | political context | reader response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.006 American Literature (MIT) 21L.006 American Literature (MIT)

Description

This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison. This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison.

Subjects

novel | novel | literature | literature | poetry | poetry | America | America | American | American | independence | independence | Melville | Melville | Twain | Twain | Morrison | Morrison | realism | realism | satire | satire | history | history | biography | biography | Emerson | Emerson | Hawthorne | Hawthorne | Thoreau | Thoreau | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Dickinson | Dickinson | Wharton | Wharton | Hurston | Hurston | Rowlandson | Rowlandson | Douglass | Douglass

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.501 The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger (MIT) 21L.501 The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger (MIT)

Description

This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs. This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs.

Subjects

novel | novel | literature | literature | America | America | American | American | strangers | strangers | maps | maps | timeline | timeline | genealogy | genealogy | literary analysis | literary analysis | fiction | fiction | Moby-Dick | Moby-Dick | Melville | Melville | Jacobs | Jacobs | Twain | Twain | Wharton | Wharton | Faulkner | Faulkner | Morrison | Morrison | Butler | Butler

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Students, scholars, bloggers, reviewers, fans, and book-group members write about literature, but so do authors themselves. Through the ways they engage with their own texts and those of other artists, sampling, remixing, and rethinking texts and genres, writers reflect on and inspire questions about the creative process. We will examine Mary Shelley's reshaping of Milton's Paradise Lost, German fairy tales, tales of scientific discovery, and her husband's poems to make Frankenstein (1818, 1831); Melville's redesign of a travel narrative into a Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856); and Alison Bechdel's rewriting of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) in her graphic novel Fun Home (2006). Showings of film versions of some of these works will allow us to project forw Students, scholars, bloggers, reviewers, fans, and book-group members write about literature, but so do authors themselves. Through the ways they engage with their own texts and those of other artists, sampling, remixing, and rethinking texts and genres, writers reflect on and inspire questions about the creative process. We will examine Mary Shelley's reshaping of Milton's Paradise Lost, German fairy tales, tales of scientific discovery, and her husband's poems to make Frankenstein (1818, 1831); Melville's redesign of a travel narrative into a Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856); and Alison Bechdel's rewriting of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) in her graphic novel Fun Home (2006). Showings of film versions of some of these works will allow us to project forw

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | Rethinking texts and genres | Rethinking texts and genres | Mary Shelley’s rewrite of Milton’s Paradise Lost | Mary Shelley’s rewrite of Milton’s Paradise Lost | German fairy tales | German fairy tales | Scientific discovery tales | Scientific discovery tales | Frankenstein (1831) | Frankenstein (1831) | Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856) | Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856) | Alison Bechdel’s rewriting of The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) | Alison Bechdel’s rewriting of The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) | Fun Home (2006). | Fun Home (2006).

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Winston Churchill (LOC) Winston Churchill (LOC)

Description

Subjects

writer | writer | libraryofcongress | libraryofcongress | novelist | novelist

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Description

Humanitas Inaugural Keynote Lecture - Athol Fugard: "Defining Moments" - in his life and work. Venue: Simpkins Lee Lecture Theatre, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

screenplay | tsotsi | playwright | south africa | fugard | writing | novel | #greatwriters | film | screenplay | tsotsi | playwright | south africa | fugard | writing | novel | #greatwriters | film | 2010-11-13

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

In this class, you will read, think about, and (I hope) enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary genres today, if not the most popular: the novel. Some of the questions we will consider are: Why did so many novels appear in the eighteenth century? Why were they—and are they—called novels? Who wrote them? Who read them? Who narrates them? What are they likely to be about? Do they have distinctive characteristics? What is their relationship to the time and place in which they appeared? How have they changed over the years? And, most of all, why do we like to read them so much? In this class, you will read, think about, and (I hope) enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary genres today, if not the most popular: the novel. Some of the questions we will consider are: Why did so many novels appear in the eighteenth century? Why were they—and are they—called novels? Who wrote them? Who read them? Who narrates them? What are they likely to be about? Do they have distinctive characteristics? What is their relationship to the time and place in which they appeared? How have they changed over the years? And, most of all, why do we like to read them so much?

Subjects

novel | novel | literary genre | literary genre | narrator | narrator | daniel defoe | daniel defoe | moll flanders | moll flanders | frances burney | frances burney | evelina | evelina | jane austen | jane austen | pride and prejudice | pride and prejudice | elizabeth gaskell | elizabeth gaskell | mary barton | mary barton | george eliot | george eliot | adam bede | adam bede | mary elizabeth braddon | mary elizabeth braddon | lady audley's secret | lady audley's secret | thomas hardy | thomas hardy | tess of the d'urbervilles | tess of the d'urbervilles | virginia woolf | virginia woolf | mrs. dalloway | mrs. dalloway | essay | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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s little East Prussian Head and Other Reasons why we Write

Description

Writer Claire Messud gives the Esmond Harmsworth Lecture in American Arts and Letters 2014 Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

america | writing | kant | novelist | america | writing | kant | novelist

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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s little East Prussian Head and Other Reasons why we Write

Description

Writer Claire Messud gives the Esmond Harmsworth Lecture in American Arts and Letters 2014 Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

america | writing | kant | novelist | america | writing | kant | novelist

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.007 World Literatures: Travel Writing (MIT) 21L.007 World Literatures: Travel Writing (MIT)

Description

This semester, we will read writing about travel and place from Columbus's Diario through the present. Travel writing has some special features that will shape both the content and the work for this subject: reflecting the point of view, narrative choices, and style of individuals, it also responds to the pressures of a real world only marginally under their control. Whether the traveler is a curious tourist, the leader of a national expedition, or a starving, half-naked survivor, the encounter with place shapes what travel writing can be. Accordingly, we will pay attention not only to narrative texts but to maps, objects, archives, and facts of various kinds. Our materials are organized around three regions: North America, Africa and the Atlantic world, the Arctic and Antarctic. The hist This semester, we will read writing about travel and place from Columbus's Diario through the present. Travel writing has some special features that will shape both the content and the work for this subject: reflecting the point of view, narrative choices, and style of individuals, it also responds to the pressures of a real world only marginally under their control. Whether the traveler is a curious tourist, the leader of a national expedition, or a starving, half-naked survivor, the encounter with place shapes what travel writing can be. Accordingly, we will pay attention not only to narrative texts but to maps, objects, archives, and facts of various kinds. Our materials are organized around three regions: North America, Africa and the Atlantic world, the Arctic and Antarctic. The hist

Subjects

world | world | travel | travel | writing | writing | columbus | columbus | literature | literature | north america | north america | french | french | history | history | europe | europe | caribbean | caribbean | brazil | brazil | modern | modern | religion | religion | ethnicity | ethnicity | culture | culture | shakespeare | shakespeare | defoe | defoe | rowlandson | rowlandson | walcott | walcott | montaigne | montaigne | de lery | de lery | coetzee | coetzee | essay | essay | narrative | narrative | novel | novel | poetry | poetry | drama | drama | film | film | report | report

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.003 Reading Fiction (MIT) 21L.003 Reading Fiction (MIT)

Description

This course offers students ways to become more engaged and curious readers for life. By learning the language of selected short stories and novels, students learn the language of literary description. There will be a strong emphasis on class discussion and writing. Readings will include fiction by O'Conner, Joyce, Tolstoy, Mann, Shelley, and Baldwin. This course offers students ways to become more engaged and curious readers for life. By learning the language of selected short stories and novels, students learn the language of literary description. There will be a strong emphasis on class discussion and writing. Readings will include fiction by O'Conner, Joyce, Tolstoy, Mann, Shelley, and Baldwin.

Subjects

Fiction | Fiction | Writing | Writing | Austen | Austen | Dickens | Dickens | Conrad | Conrad | Woolfe | Woolfe | Charters | Charters | literature | literature | novel | novel | narrative | narrative | verbal text | verbal text | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT) 21L.702 Studies in Fiction: Rethinking the American Masterpiece (MIT)

Description

What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context. What has been said of Moby-Dick—that it's the greatest novel no one ever reads—could just as well be said of any number of American "classics" like The Scarlet Letter, Uncle Tom's Cabin, or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This course reconsiders a small number of nineteenth-century American novels by presenting each in a surprising context.

Subjects

19th century | 19th century | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | 1800s | 1800s | novel | novel | great books | great books | literary canon | literary canon | American authors | American authors | colonial America | colonial America | native American | native American | Puritan | Puritan | Nathanial Hawthorne | Nathanial Hawthorne | Scarlet Letter | Scarlet Letter | Lydia Maria Child | Lydia Maria Child | Hobomok | Hobomok | slavery | slavery | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Uncle Tom's Cabin | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Huck Finn | Huck Finn | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Benito Cereno | Benito Cereno | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | United States | United States | culture | culture | historical context | historical context | African-American | African-American | authors | authors | William Wells Brown | William Wells Brown | Harriet Jacobs | Harriet Jacobs | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | Civil War | Civil War | Walt Whitman | Walt Whitman | gender | gender | race | race | social | social | political | political | realities | realities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.472 Major European Novels (MIT) 21L.472 Major European Novels (MIT)

Description

This subject traces the history of the European novel by studying texts that have been influential in connection with two interrelated ideas. (1) When serious fiction deals with matters of great consequence, it should not deal with the actions of persons of consequence—kings, princes, high elected officials and the like—but rather with the lives of apparently ordinary people and the everyday details of their social ambitions and desires. To use a phrase of Balzac's, serious fiction deals with "what happens everywhere". (2) This idea sometimes goes with another: that the most significant representations of the human condition are those dealing with persons who try to compel society to accept them as its destined agent, despite their absence of high birth or inheritance. This subject traces the history of the European novel by studying texts that have been influential in connection with two interrelated ideas. (1) When serious fiction deals with matters of great consequence, it should not deal with the actions of persons of consequence—kings, princes, high elected officials and the like—but rather with the lives of apparently ordinary people and the everyday details of their social ambitions and desires. To use a phrase of Balzac's, serious fiction deals with "what happens everywhere". (2) This idea sometimes goes with another: that the most significant representations of the human condition are those dealing with persons who try to compel society to accept them as its destined agent, despite their absence of high birth or inheritance.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | great books | great books | literary canon | literary canon | European literature | European literature | novel | novel | history | history | fiction | fiction | cervantes | cervantes | balzac | balzac | stendahl | stendahl | flaubert | flaubert | dostoyevsky | dostoyevsky | tolstoy | tolstoy | realistic tradition | realistic tradition | romantic | romantic | naturalism | naturalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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