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21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT) 21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact. This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact.

Subjects

renaissance | renaissance | revolution | revolution | Europe | Europe | Italy | Italy | French Revolution | French Revolution | theology | theology | magic | magic | science | science | England | England | censorship | censorship | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Italian humanism | Italian humanism | Copernicus | Copernicus | Constantine | Constantine | printing | printing | rare books | rare books | paper-making | paper-making | Erasmus of Rotterdam | Erasmus of Rotterdam | The Paraclesis | The Paraclesis | free will | free will | Luther | Luther | German Peasants War | German Peasants War | The Cheese and the Worms | The Cheese and the Worms | Protestant revolution | Protestant revolution | Catholic renewal | Catholic renewal | radical reform movements | radical reform movements | religion | religion | Menocchio | Menocchio | skepticism | skepticism | the occult | the occult | Michel de Montaigne | Michel de Montaigne | astrology | astrology | Cardano | Cardano | Cartesian Method | Cartesian Method | Discourse on Method | Discourse on Method | English Civil War | English Civil War | interregnum | Putney debates | interregnum | Putney debates | Wallington's World | Wallington's World | The Mad Hatter | The Mad Hatter | Isaac Newton | Isaac Newton | Newtonianism | Newtonianism | Principia | Principia | The Encyclopedie | The Encyclopedie | Diderot | Diderot | d'Alembert | d'Alembert | metric system | metric system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Conflicts and Post-Conflicts Dynamics (DRC and Rwanda): Occult Beliefs versus Modern Politics, Truth versus Justice and Justice versus Peace

Description

Alex Ntung provides insight into the significance of occult beliefs in the construction of modern political ideologies Alex Ntung was born into a family of cattle-herders, semi-nomadic and pastoralists in South Kivu. Growing up he survived extreme poverty and hardship, child spying, and violence at a terrifying scale. His hunger for education took him to a school in Uvira and then university in Rwanda. Here he was witness to the 1994 genocide and the subsequent violence and conflict in the region fuelled by Tutsi and Hutu ethnicity. He became a humanitarian worker for UN related NGOs and then came to the UK where he underwent a stringent asylum process and later gained an MA in Anthropology of Conflict, Violence and Conciliation at the University of Sussex. He is currently an author, DRC a Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

conflict | post-conflict | genocide | occult beliefs | conflict | post-conflict | genocide | occult beliefs

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT) 21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips. This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips.

Subjects

magic | magic | witches | witches | witchcraft | witchcraft | belief | belief | superstition | superstition | sorcery | sorcery | ghost | ghost | spirit | spirit | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | devil | devil | angel | angel | occult | occult | paranormal | paranormal | religion | religion | allegory | allegory | Bible | Bible | God | God | sin | sin | alchemy | alchemy | astrology | astrology | mystic | mystic | mysticism | mysticism | Europe | Europe | European history | European history | medieval | medieval | Renaissance | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Goethe | Goethe | Henry James | Henry James | 19th century America | 19th century America | metaphysics | metaphysics | pragmatism | pragmatism | death | death | afterlife | afterlife | soul | soul | phantom | phantom | myth | myth | spell | spell | wizard | wizard | wisdom | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT) 21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural.

Subjects

21M.013 | 21M.013 | 21A.113 | 21A.113 | 21L.013 | 21L.013 | Macbeth | Macbeth | Dido and Aeneas | Dido and Aeneas | Faust | Faust | Liszt | Liszt | Berlioz | Berlioz | Murnau | Murnau | Turn of the Screw | Turn of the Screw | magic | magic | witches | witches | witchcraft | witchcraft | belief | belief | superstition | superstition | sorcery | sorcery | ghost | ghost | spirit | spirit | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | devil | devil | angel | angel | occult | occult | paranormal | paranormal | religion | religion | allegory | allegory | Bible | Bible | God | God | sin | sin | alchemy | alchemy | astrology | astrology | mystic | mystic | mysticism | mysticism | Europe | Europe | European history | European history | medieval | medieval | Renaissance | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Goethe | Goethe | Henry James | Henry James | 19th century America | 19th century America | metaphysics | metaphysics | pragmatism | pragmatism | death | death | afterlife | afterlife | soul | soul | phantom | phantom | myth | myth | spell | spell | wizard | wizard | wisdom | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips.

Subjects

magic | witches | witchcraft | belief | superstition | sorcery | ghost | spirit | heaven | hell | devil | angel | occult | paranormal | religion | allegory | Bible | God | sin | alchemy | astrology | mystic | mysticism | Europe | European history | medieval | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Goethe | Henry James | 19th century America | metaphysics | pragmatism | death | afterlife | soul | phantom | myth | spell | wizard | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural.

Subjects

21M.013 | 21A.113 | 21L.013 | Macbeth | Dido and Aeneas | Faust | Liszt | Berlioz | Murnau | Turn of the Screw | magic | witches | witchcraft | belief | superstition | sorcery | ghost | spirit | heaven | hell | devil | angel | occult | paranormal | religion | allegory | Bible | God | sin | alchemy | astrology | mystic | mysticism | Europe | European history | medieval | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Goethe | Henry James | 19th century America | metaphysics | pragmatism | death | afterlife | soul | phantom | myth | spell | wizard | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips.

Subjects

magic | witches | witchcraft | belief | superstition | sorcery | ghost | spirit | heaven | hell | devil | angel | occult | paranormal | religion | allegory | Bible | God | sin | alchemy | astrology | mystic | mysticism | Europe | European history | medieval | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Goethe | Henry James | 19th century America | metaphysics | pragmatism | death | afterlife | soul | phantom | myth | spell | wizard | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact.

Subjects

renaissance | revolution | Europe | Italy | French Revolution | theology | magic | science | England | censorship | Rene Descartes | Italian humanism | Copernicus | Constantine | printing | rare books | paper-making | Erasmus of Rotterdam | The Paraclesis | free will | Luther | German Peasants War | The Cheese and the Worms | Protestant revolution | Catholic renewal | radical reform movements | religion | Menocchio | skepticism | the occult | Michel de Montaigne | astrology | Cardano | Cartesian Method | Discourse on Method | English Civil War | interregnum | Putney debates | Wallington's World | The Mad Hatter | Isaac Newton | Newtonianism | Principia | The Encyclopedie | Diderot | d'Alembert | metric system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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