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6.637 Optical Signals, Devices, and Systems (MIT) 6.637 Optical Signals, Devices, and Systems (MIT)

Description

6.637 covers the fundamentals of optical signals and modern optical devices and systems from a practical point of view. Its goal is to help students develop a thorough understanding of the underlying physical principles such that device and system design and performance can be predicted, analyzed, and understood. Most optical systems involve the use of one or more of the following: sources (e.g., lasers and light-emitting diodes), light modulation components (e.g., liquid-crystal light modulators), transmission media (e.g., free space or fibers), photodetectors (e.g., photodiodes, photomultiplier tubes), information storage devices (e.g., optical disk), processing systems (e.g., imaging and spatial filtering systems) and displays (LCOS microdisplays). These are the topics covered by this 6.637 covers the fundamentals of optical signals and modern optical devices and systems from a practical point of view. Its goal is to help students develop a thorough understanding of the underlying physical principles such that device and system design and performance can be predicted, analyzed, and understood. Most optical systems involve the use of one or more of the following: sources (e.g., lasers and light-emitting diodes), light modulation components (e.g., liquid-crystal light modulators), transmission media (e.g., free space or fibers), photodetectors (e.g., photodiodes, photomultiplier tubes), information storage devices (e.g., optical disk), processing systems (e.g., imaging and spatial filtering systems) and displays (LCOS microdisplays). These are the topics covered by this

Subjects

optical | optical | optical signals | optical signals | optical devices | optical devices | transmission | transmission | detection | detection | storage | storage | processing | processing | display | display | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | diffraction | diffraction | holography | holography | lasers | lasers | LEDs | LEDs | spatial light modulation | spatial light modulation | display technologies | display technologies | optical waveguides | optical waveguides | fiberoptic communication | fiberoptic communication | thermal photodetector | thermal photodetector | quantum photodetector | quantum photodetector | optical storage media | optical storage media | disks | disks | 3-D holographic material | 3-D holographic material | coherent optical processor | coherent optical processor | incoherent optical processor | incoherent optical processor | Fourier optics | Fourier optics | acousto-optics | acousto-optics | optoelectronic neural networks | optoelectronic neural networks | optical interconnection device technologies | optical interconnection device technologies | image processing | image processing | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | radar systems | radar systems | adaptive optical systems | adaptive optical systems | 6.161 | 6.161

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6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT) 6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.161 explores modern optics through lectures, laboratory exercises, and projects. Topics covered include: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, coherent optical processors, holography, optical properties of materials, lasers, nonlinear optics, electro-optic and acousto-optic materials and devices, optical detectors, fiber optics, and optical communication. This course is worth 12 Engineering Design Points. 6.161 explores modern optics through lectures, laboratory exercises, and projects. Topics covered include: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, coherent optical processors, holography, optical properties of materials, lasers, nonlinear optics, electro-optic and acousto-optic materials and devices, optical detectors, fiber optics, and optical communication. This course is worth 12 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

modern optics lab | modern optics lab | modern optics | modern optics | laboratory | laboratory | polarization | polarization | light | light | reflection | reflection | refraction | refraction | coherence | coherence | interference | interference | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | imaging | imaging | transforming | transforming | lenses | lenses | spatial filtering | spatial filtering | coherent optical processors | coherent optical processors | holography | holography | optical properties of materials | optical properties of materials | lasers | lasers | nonlinear optics | nonlinear optics | electro-optic | electro-optic | acousto-optic | acousto-optic | optical detectors | optical detectors | fiber optics | fiber optics | optical communication | optical communication

License

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6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT) 6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.161 offers an introduction to laboratory optics, optical principles, and optical devices and systems. This course covers a wide range of topics, including: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, holography, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, two-lens coherent optical processor, optical properties of materials, lasers, electro-optic, acousto-optic and liquid-crystal light modulators, optical detectors, optical waveguides and fiber-optic communication systems. Students engage in extensive oral and written communication exercises. There are 12 engineering design points associated with this subject. 6.161 offers an introduction to laboratory optics, optical principles, and optical devices and systems. This course covers a wide range of topics, including: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, holography, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, two-lens coherent optical processor, optical properties of materials, lasers, electro-optic, acousto-optic and liquid-crystal light modulators, optical detectors, optical waveguides and fiber-optic communication systems. Students engage in extensive oral and written communication exercises. There are 12 engineering design points associated with this subject.

Subjects

modern optics lab | modern optics lab | modern optics | modern optics | laboratory | laboratory | polarization | polarization | light | light | reflection | reflection | refraction | refraction | coherence | coherence | interference | interference | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | imaging | imaging | transforming | transforming | lenses | lenses | spatial filtering | spatial filtering | coherent optical processors | coherent optical processors | holography | holography | optical properties of materials | optical properties of materials | lasers | lasers | nonlinear optics | nonlinear optics | electro-optic | electro-optic | acousto-optic | acousto-optic | optical detectors | optical detectors | fiber optics | fiber optics | optical communication | optical communication

License

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6.637 Optical Signals, Devices, and Systems (MIT)

Description

6.637 covers the fundamentals of optical signals and modern optical devices and systems from a practical point of view. Its goal is to help students develop a thorough understanding of the underlying physical principles such that device and system design and performance can be predicted, analyzed, and understood. Most optical systems involve the use of one or more of the following: sources (e.g., lasers and light-emitting diodes), light modulation components (e.g., liquid-crystal light modulators), transmission media (e.g., free space or fibers), photodetectors (e.g., photodiodes, photomultiplier tubes), information storage devices (e.g., optical disk), processing systems (e.g., imaging and spatial filtering systems) and displays (LCOS microdisplays). These are the topics covered by this

Subjects

optical | optical signals | optical devices | transmission | detection | storage | processing | display | electromagnetic waves | diffraction | holography | lasers | LEDs | spatial light modulation | display technologies | optical waveguides | fiberoptic communication | thermal photodetector | quantum photodetector | optical storage media | disks | 3-D holographic material | coherent optical processor | incoherent optical processor | Fourier optics | acousto-optics | optoelectronic neural networks | optical interconnection device technologies | image processing | pattern recognition | radar systems | adaptive optical systems | 6.161

License

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6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.161 offers an introduction to laboratory optics, optical principles, and optical devices and systems. This course covers a wide range of topics, including: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, holography, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, two-lens coherent optical processor, optical properties of materials, lasers, electro-optic, acousto-optic and liquid-crystal light modulators, optical detectors, optical waveguides and fiber-optic communication systems. Students engage in extensive oral and written communication exercises. There are 12 engineering design points associated with this subject.

Subjects

modern optics lab | modern optics | laboratory | polarization | light | reflection | refraction | coherence | interference | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | imaging | transforming | lenses | spatial filtering | coherent optical processors | holography | optical properties of materials | lasers | nonlinear optics | electro-optic | acousto-optic | optical detectors | fiber optics | optical communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optics | optics | optical science | optical science | geometrical optics | geometrical optics | ray-tracing | ray-tracing | aberrations | aberrations | lens design | lens design | apertures | apertures | stops | stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | interference | interference | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Fresnel | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product | optical design | optical design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.161 explores modern optics through lectures, laboratory exercises, and projects. Topics covered include: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, coherent optical processors, holography, optical properties of materials, lasers, nonlinear optics, electro-optic and acousto-optic materials and devices, optical detectors, fiber optics, and optical communication. This course is worth 12 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

modern optics lab | modern optics | laboratory | polarization | light | reflection | refraction | coherence | interference | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | imaging | transforming | lenses | spatial filtering | coherent optical processors | holography | optical properties of materials | lasers | nonlinear optics | electro-optic | acousto-optic | optical detectors | fiber optics | optical communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.717J Optical Engineering (MIT) 2.717J Optical Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course concerns the theory and practice of optical methods in engineering and system design, with an emphasis on diffraction, statistical optics, holography, and imaging. It provides the engineering methodology skills necessary to incorporate optical components in systems serving diverse areas such as precision engineering and metrology, bio-imaging, and computing (sensors, data storage, communication in multi-processor systems). Experimental demonstrations and a design project are included. This course concerns the theory and practice of optical methods in engineering and system design, with an emphasis on diffraction, statistical optics, holography, and imaging. It provides the engineering methodology skills necessary to incorporate optical components in systems serving diverse areas such as precision engineering and metrology, bio-imaging, and computing (sensors, data storage, communication in multi-processor systems). Experimental demonstrations and a design project are included.

Subjects

optical methods in engineering and system design | optical methods in engineering and system design | diffraction | statistical optics | holography | and imaging | diffraction | statistical optics | holography | and imaging | Statistical Optics | Inverse Problems (i.e. theory of imaging) | Statistical Optics | Inverse Problems (i.e. theory of imaging) | applications in precision engineering and metrology | bio-imaging | and computing (sensors | data storage | communication in multi-processor systems) | applications in precision engineering and metrology | bio-imaging | and computing (sensors | data storage | communication in multi-processor systems) | Fourier optics | Fourier optics | probability | probability | stochastic processes | stochastic processes | light statistics | light statistics | theory of light coherence | theory of light coherence | van Cittert-Zernicke Theorem | van Cittert-Zernicke Theorem | statistical optics applications | statistical optics applications | inverse problems | inverse problems | information-theoretic views | information-theoretic views | information theory | information theory | 2.717 | 2.717 | MAS.857 | MAS.857

License

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3.46 Photonic Materials and Devices (MIT) 3.46 Photonic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course covers the theory, design, fabrication and applications of photonic materials and devices. After a survey of optical materials design for semiconductors, dielectrics and polymers, the course examines ray optics, electromagnetic optics and guided wave optics; physics of light-matter interactions; and device design principles of LEDs, lasers, photodetectors, modulators, fiber and waveguide interconnects, optical filters, and photonic crystals. Device processing topics include crystal growth, substrate engineering, thin film deposition, etching and process integration for dielectric, silicon and compound semiconductor materials. The course also covers microphotonic integrated circuits and applications in telecom/datacom systems. Course assignments include four design projects that This course covers the theory, design, fabrication and applications of photonic materials and devices. After a survey of optical materials design for semiconductors, dielectrics and polymers, the course examines ray optics, electromagnetic optics and guided wave optics; physics of light-matter interactions; and device design principles of LEDs, lasers, photodetectors, modulators, fiber and waveguide interconnects, optical filters, and photonic crystals. Device processing topics include crystal growth, substrate engineering, thin film deposition, etching and process integration for dielectric, silicon and compound semiconductor materials. The course also covers microphotonic integrated circuits and applications in telecom/datacom systems. Course assignments include four design projects that

Subjects

Optical materials design | Optical materials design | Ray optics | Ray optics | electromagnetic optics | electromagnetic optics | guided wave optics | guided wave optics | light-matter interactions | light-matter interactions | LED | LED | laser | laser | photodetector | photodetector | modulator | modulator | interconnect | interconnect | optical filter | optical filter | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | crystal growth | crystal growth | substrate engineering | substrate engineering | thin film deposition | thin film deposition | microphotonic integrated circuits | microphotonic integrated circuits | telecom and datacom systems | telecom and datacom systems

License

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3.46 Photonic Materials and Devices (MIT) 3.46 Photonic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course covers the theory, design, fabrication and applications of photonic materials and devices. After a survey of optical materials design for semiconductors, dielectrics and polymers, the course examines ray optics, electromagnetic optics and guided wave optics; physics of light-matter interactions; and device design principles of LEDs, lasers, photodetectors, modulators, fiber and waveguide interconnects, optical filters, and photonic crystals. Device processing topics include crystal growth, substrate engineering, thin film deposition, etching and process integration for dielectric, silicon and compound semiconductor materials. The course also covers microphotonic integrated circuits and applications in telecom/datacom systems. Course assignments includ This course covers the theory, design, fabrication and applications of photonic materials and devices. After a survey of optical materials design for semiconductors, dielectrics and polymers, the course examines ray optics, electromagnetic optics and guided wave optics; physics of light-matter interactions; and device design principles of LEDs, lasers, photodetectors, modulators, fiber and waveguide interconnects, optical filters, and photonic crystals. Device processing topics include crystal growth, substrate engineering, thin film deposition, etching and process integration for dielectric, silicon and compound semiconductor materials. The course also covers microphotonic integrated circuits and applications in telecom/datacom systems. Course assignments includ

Subjects

Optical materials design | Optical materials design | Ray optics | Ray optics | electromagnetic optics | electromagnetic optics | guided wave optics | guided wave optics | light-matter interactions | light-matter interactions | LED | LED | laser | laser | photodetector | photodetector | modulator | modulator | interconnect | interconnect | optical filter | optical filter | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | crystal growth | crystal growth | substrate engineering | substrate engineering | thin film deposition | thin film deposition | microphotonic integrated circuits | microphotonic integrated circuits | telecom and datacom systems | telecom and datacom systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.977 Ultrafast Optics (MIT) 6.977 Ultrafast Optics (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and addresses issues regarding ultrafast optics. Topics covered include: Generation, propagation and applications of ultrashort pulses (nano-, pico-, femto-, attosecond pulses); Linear and nonlinear pulse shaping processes: Optical solitons, Pulse compression; Laser principles: Single- and multi-mode laser dynamics, Q-switching, Active and passive mode-locking; Pulse characterization: Autocorrelation, FROG, SPIDER; Noise in mode-locked lasers and its limitations in measurements; Laser amplifiers, optical parametric amplifiers, and oscillators; Applications in research and industry: Pump-probe techniques, Optical imaging, Frequency metrology, Laser ablation, High harmonic generation. This course is offered to graduate students and addresses issues regarding ultrafast optics. Topics covered include: Generation, propagation and applications of ultrashort pulses (nano-, pico-, femto-, attosecond pulses); Linear and nonlinear pulse shaping processes: Optical solitons, Pulse compression; Laser principles: Single- and multi-mode laser dynamics, Q-switching, Active and passive mode-locking; Pulse characterization: Autocorrelation, FROG, SPIDER; Noise in mode-locked lasers and its limitations in measurements; Laser amplifiers, optical parametric amplifiers, and oscillators; Applications in research and industry: Pump-probe techniques, Optical imaging, Frequency metrology, Laser ablation, High harmonic generation.

Subjects

ultrafast optics | ultrafast optics | generation | generation | propagation | propagation | ultrashort pulses | ultrashort pulses | nanopulses | nanopulses | picopulses | picopulses | femtopulses | femtopulses | attosecond pulses | attosecond pulses | linear | linear | non-linear | non-linear | effects | effects | high precision | high precision | measurements | measurements | nonlinear optics | nonlinear optics | optical signal processing | optical signal processing | optical communications | optical communications | x-ray generation | x-ray generation

License

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered include geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry; wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, and space-bandwidth product. Emphasis is on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. This course is an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered include geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry; wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, and space-bandwidth product. Emphasis is on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optical science | optical science | elementary engineering applications | elementary engineering applications | Geometrical optics | Geometrical optics | ray-tracing | ray-tracing | aberrations | aberrations | lens design; apertures | lens design; apertures | stops | stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | basic electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | interference | interference | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Fresnel | Faunhofer diffraction | Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product | optical design | optical design

License

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optical science | optical science | elementary engineering applications | elementary engineering applications | Geometrical optics | Geometrical optics | ray-tracing | ray-tracing | aberrations | aberrations | lens design | lens design | apertures | apertures | stops | stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | basic electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | interference | interference | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Fresnel | Faunhofer diffraction | Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product | optical design | optical design

License

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18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers. This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

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18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005. Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT) Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance. This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | electrical conductivity | doping | doping | transistors | transistors | photodectors | photodectors | photovoltaics | photovoltaics | luminescence | luminescence | light emitting diodes | light emitting diodes | lasers | lasers | optical phenomena | optical phenomena | photonics | photonics | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | magnetoresistance | electrical devices | electrical devices | optical devices | optical devices | magnetic devices | magnetic devices | materials | materials | device applications | device applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | number states | coherent states | coherent states | and squeezed states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation. | and quantum teleportation.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields | P-representation and classical fields | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | quantum teleportation | quantum teleportation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Optical Communication Systems Optical Communication Systems

Description

This course is a brief introduction to optical communication systems. These systems are described, focusing on lasers, photodetectors, fibers, and design budgets. The aim is qualifying students to design simple optical systems. This course is a brief introduction to optical communication systems. These systems are described, focusing on lasers, photodetectors, fibers, and design budgets. The aim is qualifying students to design simple optical systems.

Subjects

optical network | optical network | photodetector | photodetector | laser | laser | optical modulation. | optical modulation. | Teoría de la señal y comunicaciones | Teoría de la señal y comunicaciones | optic fiber | optic fiber

License

Copyright 2009, by the Contributing Authors

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | number states | coherent states | coherent states | and squeezed states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation. | and quantum teleportation.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.071 Amorphous Materials (MIT) 3.071 Amorphous Materials (MIT)

Description

This course discusses the fundamental material science behind amorphous solids, or non-crystalline materials. It covers formation of amorphous solids; amorphous structures and their electrical and optical properties; and characterization methods and technical applications. This course discusses the fundamental material science behind amorphous solids, or non-crystalline materials. It covers formation of amorphous solids; amorphous structures and their electrical and optical properties; and characterization methods and technical applications.

Subjects

glass | glass | amorphous solid | amorphous solid | mechanical and optical properties | mechanical and optical properties | metastable | metastable | silica | silica | ideal crystals | ideal crystals | network formers | network formers | modifiers | modifiers | intermediates | intermediates | alkali silicate glass | alkali silicate glass | amorphous semiconductors | amorphous semiconductors | metallic glass | metallic glass | glass forming theory | glass forming theory | crystallization | crystallization | thermodynamics of nucleation | thermodynamics of nucleation | potential energy landscape | potential energy landscape | Zachariasen’s rules | Zachariasen’s rules | kinetic theory | kinetic theory | network topology theory | network topology theory | laboratory glass transition | laboratory glass transition | glass forming ability parmaters | glass forming ability parmaters | performance metrics | performance metrics | GST phase change alloy | GST phase change alloy | PCM | PCM | phase change memory | phase change memory | data storage | data storage | pitch drop experiment | pitch drop experiment | temperature dependence | temperature dependence | viscous flow | viscous flow | stron v. fragile liquids | stron v. fragile liquids | non- newtonian behavior | non- newtonian behavior | viscometry | viscometry | linear elasticity | linear elasticity | Newtonian viscosity | Newtonian viscosity | elasticity | elasticity | viscosity | viscosity | glass shaping | glass shaping | relaxation | relaxation | mechanical properties | mechanical properties | glass stregthening | glass stregthening | electrical properties | electrical properties | transport properties | transport properties | macroelectronics | macroelectronics | optical properties | optical properties | optical fibers | optical fibers | waveguides | waveguides | amorphous state | amorphous state

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optics | optical science | geometrical optics | ray-tracing | aberrations | lens design | apertures | stops | radiometry | photometry | Wave optics | electrodynamics | polarization | interference | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Fraunhofer diffraction | image formation | resolution | space-bandwidth product | optical design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optical science | elementary engineering applications | Geometrical optics | ray-tracing | aberrations | lens design | apertures | stops | radiometry | photometry | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | polarization | interference | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | resolution | space-bandwidth product | optical design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT) Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. The class uses a device-motivated approach which emphasizes emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance. This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. The class uses a device-motivated approach which emphasizes emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | electrical conductivity | doping | doping | transistors | transistors | photodectors | photodectors | photovoltaics | photovoltaics | luminescence | luminescence | light emitting diodes | light emitting diodes | lasers | lasers | optical phenomena | optical phenomena | photonics | photonics | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | magnetoresistance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered include geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry; wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, and space-bandwidth product. Emphasis is on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optical science | elementary engineering applications | Geometrical optics | ray-tracing | aberrations | lens design; apertures | stops | radiometry | photometry | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | polarization | interference | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | resolution | space-bandwidth product | optical design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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