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18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers. This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT) Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance. This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | electrical conductivity | doping | doping | transistors | transistors | photodectors | photodectors | photovoltaics | photovoltaics | luminescence | luminescence | light emitting diodes | light emitting diodes | lasers | lasers | optical phenomena | optical phenomena | photonics | photonics | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | magnetoresistance | electrical devices | electrical devices | optical devices | optical devices | magnetic devices | magnetic devices | materials | materials | device applications | device applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.637 Optical Signals, Devices, and Systems (MIT) 6.637 Optical Signals, Devices, and Systems (MIT)

Description

6.637 covers the fundamentals of optical signals and modern optical devices and systems from a practical point of view. Its goal is to help students develop a thorough understanding of the underlying physical principles such that device and system design and performance can be predicted, analyzed, and understood. Most optical systems involve the use of one or more of the following: sources (e.g., lasers and light-emitting diodes), light modulation components (e.g., liquid-crystal light modulators), transmission media (e.g., free space or fibers), photodetectors (e.g., photodiodes, photomultiplier tubes), information storage devices (e.g., optical disk), processing systems (e.g., imaging and spatial filtering systems) and displays (LCOS microdisplays). These are the topics covered by this 6.637 covers the fundamentals of optical signals and modern optical devices and systems from a practical point of view. Its goal is to help students develop a thorough understanding of the underlying physical principles such that device and system design and performance can be predicted, analyzed, and understood. Most optical systems involve the use of one or more of the following: sources (e.g., lasers and light-emitting diodes), light modulation components (e.g., liquid-crystal light modulators), transmission media (e.g., free space or fibers), photodetectors (e.g., photodiodes, photomultiplier tubes), information storage devices (e.g., optical disk), processing systems (e.g., imaging and spatial filtering systems) and displays (LCOS microdisplays). These are the topics covered by this

Subjects

optical | optical | optical signals | optical signals | optical devices | optical devices | transmission | transmission | detection | detection | storage | storage | processing | processing | display | display | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | diffraction | diffraction | holography | holography | lasers | lasers | LEDs | LEDs | spatial light modulation | spatial light modulation | display technologies | display technologies | optical waveguides | optical waveguides | fiberoptic communication | fiberoptic communication | thermal photodetector | thermal photodetector | quantum photodetector | quantum photodetector | optical storage media | optical storage media | disks | disks | 3-D holographic material | 3-D holographic material | coherent optical processor | coherent optical processor | incoherent optical processor | incoherent optical processor | Fourier optics | Fourier optics | acousto-optics | acousto-optics | optoelectronic neural networks | optoelectronic neural networks | optical interconnection device technologies | optical interconnection device technologies | image processing | image processing | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | radar systems | radar systems | adaptive optical systems | adaptive optical systems | 6.161 | 6.161

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005. Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers.

Subjects

linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | doping | transistors | photodectors | photovoltaics | luminescence | light emitting diodes | lasers | optical phenomena | photonics | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | electrical devices | optical devices | magnetic devices | materials | device applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Attribution

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18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005.

Subjects

linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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6.637 Optical Signals, Devices, and Systems (MIT)

Description

6.637 covers the fundamentals of optical signals and modern optical devices and systems from a practical point of view. Its goal is to help students develop a thorough understanding of the underlying physical principles such that device and system design and performance can be predicted, analyzed, and understood. Most optical systems involve the use of one or more of the following: sources (e.g., lasers and light-emitting diodes), light modulation components (e.g., liquid-crystal light modulators), transmission media (e.g., free space or fibers), photodetectors (e.g., photodiodes, photomultiplier tubes), information storage devices (e.g., optical disk), processing systems (e.g., imaging and spatial filtering systems) and displays (LCOS microdisplays). These are the topics covered by this

Subjects

optical | optical signals | optical devices | transmission | detection | storage | processing | display | electromagnetic waves | diffraction | holography | lasers | LEDs | spatial light modulation | display technologies | optical waveguides | fiberoptic communication | thermal photodetector | quantum photodetector | optical storage media | disks | 3-D holographic material | coherent optical processor | incoherent optical processor | Fourier optics | acousto-optics | optoelectronic neural networks | optical interconnection device technologies | image processing | pattern recognition | radar systems | adaptive optical systems | 6.161

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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