Searching for personhood : 18 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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On the very idea of criteria for personhood (4 Nov 2010)

Description

Timothy Chappell, Professor of Philosophy, Open University, gives a talk for the Ian Ramsay Seminar series on 4th November, 2010. Professor Chappell examines the familiar criterial view of personhood, according to which the possession of personal properties such as self-consciousness, emotionality, sentience, and so forth is necessary and sufficient for the status of a person. He argues that this view confuses criteria for personhood with parts of an ideal of personhood. In normal cases, we have already identified a creature as a person before we start looking for it to manifest the personal properties, indeed this pre-identification is part of what makes it possible for us to see and interpret the creature as a person in the first place. And that pre-identification typically runs on biolo Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

personhood | philosophy | identity | personhood | philosophy | identity | 2010-11-04

License

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Spiders, yes, but why cats?

Description

Prof.Iain McGilchrist illustrates his argument by appeal to a number of paintings done by psychotic patients. He points to various commonalities between these paintings and speculates on the ways in which they support claims about the two hemispheres and Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | psychosis | art | spiders | cats | left-hemisphere | right-hemisphere | philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | psychosis | art | spiders | cats | left-hemisphere | right-hemisphere

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Was Schubert a musical brain?

Description

Prof. Raymond Tallis deepens his argument against the idea that we are our brains. He believes there is a distinction in kind between humans and other animals. This he illustrates by appeal to the differences between the music of Schubert and the singing Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | music | birdsong | philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | music | birdsong

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Am I my mind?

Description

Prof. Iain McGilchrist, whilst agreeing with Tallis that we are not our brains argues that we can learn a great deal about our culture by learning more about our brain. In particular we should recognise we have two hemispheres, each with a different funct Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem

License

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Am I my brain?

Description

Prof. Raymond Tallis argues that extraordinary claims have been made for neurophysiology. For example it has been said that a person is nothing but his or her brain. Professor Raymond Tallis rejects this ?neuromania?. He shows why it is attractive, but al Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem

License

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Spiders, yes, but why cats?

Description

Prof.Iain McGilchrist illustrates his argument by appeal to a number of paintings done by psychotic patients. He points to various commonalities between these paintings and speculates on the ways in which they support claims about the two hemispheres and Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | psychosis | art | spiders | cats | left-hemisphere | right-hemisphere | philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | psychosis | art | spiders | cats | left-hemisphere | right-hemisphere

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Was Schubert a musical brain?

Description

Prof. Raymond Tallis deepens his argument against the idea that we are our brains. He believes there is a distinction in kind between humans and other animals. This he illustrates by appeal to the differences between the music of Schubert and the singing Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | music | birdsong | philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | music | birdsong

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Am I my mind?

Description

Prof. Iain McGilchrist, whilst agreeing with Tallis that we are not our brains argues that we can learn a great deal about our culture by learning more about our brain. In particular we should recognise we have two hemispheres, each with a different funct Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | philosophy | mind | hemisphere | Tallis | McGilchrist | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Am I my brain?

Description

Prof. Raymond Tallis argues that extraordinary claims have been made for neurophysiology. For example it has been said that a person is nothing but his or her brain. Professor Raymond Tallis rejects this ?neuromania?. He shows why it is attractive, but al Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem | philosophy | mind | Tallis | brain | neurophysiology | personhood | culture | neuromania | mind-body problem

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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2014 Uehiro Lecture (3): The Question of Legal Rights for Animals

Description

In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. The instability in human attitudes about the moral standing of animals is reflected in our laws. Animal welfare laws offer animals some legal protections, but those protections do not take the form of animal rights. Partly as a consequence, these laws are often ineffective. Organizations with an interest in activities that are harmful to animals, such as factory farms or experimental laboratories, often manage to get their own activities exempt from the restrictions or the animals they deal with exempt from the protections. On the other hand, many people find Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethics | animal rights | personhood | legal rights for animals | ethics | animal rights | personhood | legal rights for animals

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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2014 Uehiro Lecture (2): The Moral Standing of Animals

Description

In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Human attitudes towards the other animals exhibit a curious instability. Nearly everyone thinks we have some obligations with respect to the other animals ? that whenever possible, we should treat them ?humanely.? Yet human beings have traditionally regarded nearly any reason we might have for overriding this obligation, short of malicious enjoyment of their suffering, as a sufficient reason. We kill or hurt animals in order to eat them, in order to make useful or desirable products out of them, because we can learn from experimenting on them, because t Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethics | animal rights | personhood | legal rights for animals | ethics | animal rights | personhood | legal rights for animals

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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2014 Uehiro Lecture (1): Animals, Human Beings, and Persons

Description

In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Legitimate differences in the ways we treat animals, human beings, and other entities that have moral or legal rights ? legal persons ? must be based on the differences between them. Philosophers have traditionally cited a variety of factors ? rationality, sentience, having interests ? as morally significant. In this lecture I discuss what the morally relevant similarities and differences between these kinds of entities might be. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethics | animal rights | personhood | legal rights of animals | ethics | animal rights | personhood | legal rights of animals

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21A.150 Teaching and Learning: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (MIT) 21A.150 Teaching and Learning: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (MIT)

Description

This course explores the diverse ways that people teach and learn—in different countries, in different disciplines, and in different subcultures. We will discuss how theories of learning can be applied to a variety of hands-on, in-class learning activities. We compare schooling to other forms of knowledge transmission from initiation and apprenticeship to recent innovations in online education such as MOOCs. Students will employ a range of qualitative methods in conducting original research on topics of their choice. This course explores the diverse ways that people teach and learn—in different countries, in different disciplines, and in different subcultures. We will discuss how theories of learning can be applied to a variety of hands-on, in-class learning activities. We compare schooling to other forms of knowledge transmission from initiation and apprenticeship to recent innovations in online education such as MOOCs. Students will employ a range of qualitative methods in conducting original research on topics of their choice.

Subjects

teaching | teaching | learning | learning | culture | culture | cross-cultural perspectives | cross-cultural perspectives | subcultures | subcultures | schooling | schooling | initiation | initiation | apprenticeship | apprenticeship | education | education | online education | online education | MOOCs | MOOCs | interviewing | interviewing | observation | observation | ethnography | ethnography | discourse analysis | discourse analysis | socialization | socialization | social learning | social learning | ritual | ritual | rites of passage | rites of passage | imitation | imitation | improvisation | improvisation | creativity | creativity | language | language | personhood | personhood | identity | identity | cognition | cognition | perception | perception

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT) 21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | cross-cultural study | cross-cultural study | bio-medical ethics | bio-medical ethics | moral foundations | moral foundations | science | science | western bio-medicine | western bio-medicine | case studies | case studies | abortion | abortion | contraception | contraception | cloning | cloning | organ transplantation | organ transplantation | medical technologies | medical technologies | practice | practice | availability | availability | medical services | medical services | globe | globe | kinship | kinship | personhood | personhood | critique | critique | anthropological | anthropological | feminist | feminist | legal | legal | religious | religious | theorists. | theorists. | theorists | theorists | 21A.216 | 21A.216 | SP.622 | SP.622

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

Anthropology | cross-cultural study | bio-medical ethics | moral foundations | science | western bio-medicine | case studies | abortion | contraception | cloning | organ transplantation | medical technologies | practice | availability | medical services | globe | kinship | personhood | critique | anthropological | feminist | legal | religious | theorists. | theorists | 21A.216 | SP.622

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Philosophy: the nature of persons

Description

What is a person? This unit examines this philosophical question concerning the nature of personhood. You will examine whether a ‘person’ is the same as a ‘human being’, and look at whether it is our free will that in the end defines us as a ‘person’.

Subjects

arts and history | human_being | humanities | person | personhood | philosophy | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21A.216J Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good? (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

Subjects

Anthropology | cross-cultural study | bio-medical ethics | moral foundations | science | western bio-medicine | case studies | abortion | contraception | cloning | organ transplantation | medical technologies | practice | availability | medical services | globe | kinship | personhood | critique | anthropological | feminist | legal | religious | theorists. | theorists | 21A.216 | SP.622

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.150 Teaching and Learning: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (MIT)

Description

This course explores the diverse ways that people teach and learn—in different countries, in different disciplines, and in different subcultures. We will discuss how theories of learning can be applied to a variety of hands-on, in-class learning activities. We compare schooling to other forms of knowledge transmission from initiation and apprenticeship to recent innovations in online education such as MOOCs. Students will employ a range of qualitative methods in conducting original research on topics of their choice.

Subjects

teaching | learning | culture | cross-cultural perspectives | subcultures | schooling | initiation | apprenticeship | education | online education | MOOCs | interviewing | observation | ethnography | discourse analysis | socialization | social learning | ritual | rites of passage | imitation | improvisation | creativity | language | personhood | identity | cognition | perception

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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