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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.570 Structure and Dynamics of the CMB Region (MIT) 12.570 Structure and Dynamics of the CMB Region (MIT)

Description

The Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) represents one of the most important physical and chemical discontinuities of the deep Earth as it separates the solid state, convective lower mantle from the liquid outer core. In this seminar course, the instructors will examine our current understanding of the CMB region from integrated seismological, mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives. Instructors will also introduce state-of-the-art methodologies that are employed to characterize the CMB region and relevant papers will be discussed in class. Topics will include CMB detection and topography, D'' anisotropy, seismic velocity anomalies (e.g., ultra-low velocity zones), temperature, chemical reactions, phase relations, and mineral fabrications at the core-mantle boundary. These results will be i The Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) represents one of the most important physical and chemical discontinuities of the deep Earth as it separates the solid state, convective lower mantle from the liquid outer core. In this seminar course, the instructors will examine our current understanding of the CMB region from integrated seismological, mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives. Instructors will also introduce state-of-the-art methodologies that are employed to characterize the CMB region and relevant papers will be discussed in class. Topics will include CMB detection and topography, D'' anisotropy, seismic velocity anomalies (e.g., ultra-low velocity zones), temperature, chemical reactions, phase relations, and mineral fabrications at the core-mantle boundary. These results will be i

Subjects

Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) | Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) | deep Earth | deep Earth | lower mantle | lower mantle | outer core | outer core | integrated seismological | integrated seismological | mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives | mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives | CMB detection and topography | CMB detection and topography | D'' anisotropy | D'' anisotropy | seismic velocity anomalies (e.g. | seismic velocity anomalies (e.g. | ultra-low velocity zones) | ultra-low velocity zones) | temperature | temperature | chemical reactions | chemical reactions | phase relations | phase relations | mineral fabrications | mineral fabrications | cmb detection | cmb detection | topography | topography | mineral physics | mineral physics | geodynamical perspectives | geodynamical perspectives | D" Region | D" Region | ultra-low velocity zones | ultra-low velocity zones | partial melting | partial melting | mineral texture | mineral texture | core rigidity zones | core rigidity zones | sedimentation | sedimentation | mantle flow | mantle flow | core mantle coupling | core mantle coupling | geomagnetic field | geomagnetic field

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | political science | economics | wealth | neoclassical | development | ecology | power | trade | capital | foreign investment | intellectual property | migration | foreignpolicy | globalization | internet | sustainability | institutions | foreign policy | IPE | dual national objectives | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | neoclassical economics | development economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | perspectives | structural views | power relations | politics | international trade | capital flows | intellectual property rights | international migration | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | comparative | time | countries | regions | firms | industrial states | developing states | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | complexity | localization | technology | knowledge economy | finance | global markets | political economy | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | political science | economics | wealth | neoclassical | development | ecology | power | trade | capital | foreign investment | intellectual property | migration | foreignpolicy | globalization | internet | sustainability | institutions | foreign policy | IPE | dual national objectives | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | neoclassical economics | development economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | perspectives | structural views | power relations | politics | international trade | capital flows | intellectual property rights | international migration | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | comparative | time | countries | regions | firms | industrial states | developing states | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | complexity | localization | technology | knowledge economy | finance | global markets | political economy | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.150 Teaching and Learning: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (MIT) 21A.150 Teaching and Learning: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (MIT)

Description

This course explores the diverse ways that people teach and learn—in different countries, in different disciplines, and in different subcultures. We will discuss how theories of learning can be applied to a variety of hands-on, in-class learning activities. We compare schooling to other forms of knowledge transmission from initiation and apprenticeship to recent innovations in online education such as MOOCs. Students will employ a range of qualitative methods in conducting original research on topics of their choice. This course explores the diverse ways that people teach and learn—in different countries, in different disciplines, and in different subcultures. We will discuss how theories of learning can be applied to a variety of hands-on, in-class learning activities. We compare schooling to other forms of knowledge transmission from initiation and apprenticeship to recent innovations in online education such as MOOCs. Students will employ a range of qualitative methods in conducting original research on topics of their choice.

Subjects

teaching | teaching | learning | learning | culture | culture | cross-cultural perspectives | cross-cultural perspectives | subcultures | subcultures | schooling | schooling | initiation | initiation | apprenticeship | apprenticeship | education | education | online education | online education | MOOCs | MOOCs | interviewing | interviewing | observation | observation | ethnography | ethnography | discourse analysis | discourse analysis | socialization | socialization | social learning | social learning | ritual | ritual | rites of passage | rites of passage | imitation | imitation | improvisation | improvisation | creativity | creativity | language | language | personhood | personhood | identity | identity | cognition | cognition | perception | perception

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.570 Structure and Dynamics of the CMB Region (MIT)

Description

The Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) represents one of the most important physical and chemical discontinuities of the deep Earth as it separates the solid state, convective lower mantle from the liquid outer core. In this seminar course, the instructors will examine our current understanding of the CMB region from integrated seismological, mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives. Instructors will also introduce state-of-the-art methodologies that are employed to characterize the CMB region and relevant papers will be discussed in class. Topics will include CMB detection and topography, D'' anisotropy, seismic velocity anomalies (e.g., ultra-low velocity zones), temperature, chemical reactions, phase relations, and mineral fabrications at the core-mantle boundary. These results will be i

Subjects

Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) | deep Earth | lower mantle | outer core | integrated seismological | mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives | CMB detection and topography | D'' anisotropy | seismic velocity anomalies (e.g. | ultra-low velocity zones) | temperature | chemical reactions | phase relations | mineral fabrications | cmb detection | topography | mineral physics | geodynamical perspectives | D" Region | ultra-low velocity zones | partial melting | mineral texture | core rigidity zones | sedimentation | mantle flow | core mantle coupling | geomagnetic field

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.960 Syntactic Models (MIT) 24.960 Syntactic Models (MIT)

Description

This course presents a comparison of different proposed architectures for the syntax module of grammar. The subject traces several themes across a wide variety of approaches, with emphasis on testable differences among models. Models discussed include ancient and medieval proposals, structuralism, early generative grammar, generative semantics, government-binding theory/minimalism, LFG, HPSG, TAG, functionalist perspectives and others. This course presents a comparison of different proposed architectures for the syntax module of grammar. The subject traces several themes across a wide variety of approaches, with emphasis on testable differences among models. Models discussed include ancient and medieval proposals, structuralism, early generative grammar, generative semantics, government-binding theory/minimalism, LFG, HPSG, TAG, functionalist perspectives and others.

Subjects

architectures | architectures | syntax module of grammar | syntax module of grammar | models | models | ancient and medieval proposals | ancient and medieval proposals | structuralism | structuralism | early generative grammar | early generative grammar | generative semantics | generative semantics | government-binding theory/minimalism | government-binding theory/minimalism | LFG | LFG | HPSG | HPSG | TAG | TAG | functionalist perspectives | functionalist perspectives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.467J Property Rights in Transition (MIT) 11.467J Property Rights in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course examines the theories and policy debates over who can own real property, how to communicate and enforce property rights, and the range of liberties that they confer. It explores alternative economic, political, and sociological perspectives of property rights and their policy and planning implications. This course examines the theories and policy debates over who can own real property, how to communicate and enforce property rights, and the range of liberties that they confer. It explores alternative economic, political, and sociological perspectives of property rights and their policy and planning implications.

Subjects

property | property | property law | property law | international law | international law | ownership | ownership | migration | migration | poverty | poverty | wealth | wealth | power | power | social values | social values | social classes | social classes | regime change | regime change | economics | economics | institutional perspectives | institutional perspectives | real estate | real estate | natural resources | natural resources | sustainability | sustainability | 11.467 | 11.467 | 4.257 | 4.257 | 17.550 | 17.550

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Egleston Square, Boston (MIT) Egleston Square, Boston (MIT)

Description

Revitalizing Urban Main Streets focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers three broad areas: an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed; the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives; and the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization. The course has dual goals: to explore the integration of economic and physical development interventions in ways that reinforce commercial district revitalization effor Revitalizing Urban Main Streets focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers three broad areas: an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed; the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives; and the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization. The course has dual goals: to explore the integration of economic and physical development interventions in ways that reinforce commercial district revitalization effor

Subjects

Urban business district decline | Urban business district decline | revitalization challenges | revitalization challenges | planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets | planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets | physical design and economic development perspectives | physical design and economic development perspectives | policies | policies | interventions | interventions | investments | investments | urban commercial revitalization | urban commercial revitalization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.322 Leading Organizations II (MIT) 15.322 Leading Organizations II (MIT)

Description

Through lectures, discussions, and class exercises, 15.322 analyzes the human processes underlying organizational behavior and change. The class makes students aware of the challenge of organizational change and equips them to better handle it. There are many psychological and sociological phenomena that regularly occur in organizations, though many of these forces are difficult to see. The aim is to increase the students' understanding of these forces – in themselves and in others – so they become more visible and manageable. The prerequisite for this course is 15.321, Leading Organizations I. Through lectures, discussions, and class exercises, 15.322 analyzes the human processes underlying organizational behavior and change. The class makes students aware of the challenge of organizational change and equips them to better handle it. There are many psychological and sociological phenomena that regularly occur in organizations, though many of these forces are difficult to see. The aim is to increase the students' understanding of these forces – in themselves and in others – so they become more visible and manageable. The prerequisite for this course is 15.321, Leading Organizations I.

Subjects

organizational change | organizational change | managerial styles | managerial styles | leaders | leaders | coping with change | coping with change | psychology | psychology | sociology | sociology | employee behavior | employee behavior | strategic design | strategic design | political perspective;cultural perspective | political perspective;cultural perspective | three lenses | three lenses | politics | politics | learning styles | learning styles | career anchors | career anchors | career choices | career choices | organizationalanalysis | organizationalanalysis | group process | group process | process consultation | process consultation | salary;reward systems | salary;reward systems | incentives | incentives | business culture | business culture | political perspective | political perspective | salary | salary | reward systems | reward systems | organizational analysis | organizational analysis | cultural perspective | cultural perspective | organizational behavior | organizational behavior | human processes | human processes | leadership | leadership | cultural perspectives | cultural perspectives | change management | change management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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DP3T34 Sociology B: Application and Analysis of Sociological Theory to Sociological Topics

Description

Welcome to the Sociology B unit which addresses the following topics: social class; the family; gender; education; power and politics; race and ethnicity. Section 2 amended.

Subjects

DP3T 34 | sociological debates | Marx’s theory of social stratification | Max Weber’s theory of social stratification | Émile Durkheim’s view of social stratification | Functionalism and the family | Marxism and the family | Feminist perspectives on the family | social-historical construction of female inequality | women’s movement | Theoretical approaches and varieties of feminism | Sociological perspectives on education | Functionalist theories of education | POLITICS / ECONOMICS / LAW / SOCIAL SCIENCES | E: Politics/Economics/Law/Social Sciences | SCQF Level 7

License

Copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG). None of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG). None of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG COLEG

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24.960 Syntactic Models (MIT)

Description

This course presents a comparison of different proposed architectures for the syntax module of grammar. The subject traces several themes across a wide variety of approaches, with emphasis on testable differences among models. Models discussed include ancient and medieval proposals, structuralism, early generative grammar, generative semantics, government-binding theory/minimalism, LFG, HPSG, TAG, functionalist perspectives and others.

Subjects

architectures | syntax module of grammar | models | ancient and medieval proposals | structuralism | early generative grammar | generative semantics | government-binding theory/minimalism | LFG | HPSG | TAG | functionalist perspectives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Egleston Square, Boston (MIT)

Description

Revitalizing Urban Main Streets focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers three broad areas: an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed; the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives; and the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization. The course has dual goals: to explore the integration of economic and physical development interventions in ways that reinforce commercial district revitalization effor

Subjects

Urban business district decline | revitalization challenges | planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets | physical design and economic development perspectives | policies | interventions | investments | urban commercial revitalization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Moral and Political Philosophy

Description

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and methods of moral and political philosophy. Its primary focus is on the development of moral reasoning skills and the application of those skills to contemporary social and political issues. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Philosophy 103)

Subjects

ethics | morality | intuition | consequentialism | utilitarianism | jeremy bentham | john stuart mill | libertarianism | free market | milton friedman | john locke | individual right | immanuel kant | feminist perspectives | reproductive rights | john rawls | social contract | justice | difference principle | affirmative action | profiling | virtue | disability | marriage | patriotism | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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21A.150 Teaching and Learning: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (MIT)

Description

This course explores the diverse ways that people teach and learn—in different countries, in different disciplines, and in different subcultures. We will discuss how theories of learning can be applied to a variety of hands-on, in-class learning activities. We compare schooling to other forms of knowledge transmission from initiation and apprenticeship to recent innovations in online education such as MOOCs. Students will employ a range of qualitative methods in conducting original research on topics of their choice.

Subjects

teaching | learning | culture | cross-cultural perspectives | subcultures | schooling | initiation | apprenticeship | education | online education | MOOCs | interviewing | observation | ethnography | discourse analysis | socialization | social learning | ritual | rites of passage | imitation | improvisation | creativity | language | personhood | identity | cognition | perception

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.322 Leading Organizations II (MIT)

Description

Through lectures, discussions, and class exercises, 15.322 analyzes the human processes underlying organizational behavior and change. The class makes students aware of the challenge of organizational change and equips them to better handle it. There are many psychological and sociological phenomena that regularly occur in organizations, though many of these forces are difficult to see. The aim is to increase the students' understanding of these forces – in themselves and in others – so they become more visible and manageable. The prerequisite for this course is 15.321, Leading Organizations I.

Subjects

organizational change | managerial styles | leaders | coping with change | psychology | sociology | employee behavior | strategic design | political perspective;cultural perspective | three lenses | politics | learning styles | career anchors | career choices | organizationalanalysis | group process | process consultation | salary;reward systems | incentives | business culture | political perspective | salary | reward systems | organizational analysis | cultural perspective | organizational behavior | human processes | leadership | cultural perspectives | change management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.467J Property Rights in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course examines the theories and policy debates over who can own real property, how to communicate and enforce property rights, and the range of liberties that they confer. It explores alternative economic, political, and sociological perspectives of property rights and their policy and planning implications.

Subjects

property | property law | international law | ownership | migration | poverty | wealth | power | social values | social classes | regime change | economics | institutional perspectives | real estate | natural resources | sustainability | 11.467 | 4.257 | 17.550

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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