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II "Junior Lab" (MIT) II "Junior Lab" (MIT)

Description

Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring. The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics. Each term, students choose 5 different experiments from a list of 21 total labs. Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring. The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics. Each term, students choose 5 different experiments from a list of 21 total labs.

Subjects

Junior Lab | Junior Lab | experimental | experimental | atomic | atomic | nuclear | nuclear | physics | physics | optics | optics | photoelectric effect | photoelectric effect | poisson | poisson | statistics | statistics | electromagnetic pulse | electromagnetic pulse | compton scattering | compton scattering | Franck-Hertz experiment | Franck-Hertz experiment | relativistic dynamics | relativistic dynamics | nuclear magnetic resonance | nuclear magnetic resonance | spin echoes | spin echoes | cosmic-ray muons | cosmic-ray muons | Rutherford Scattering | Rutherford Scattering | emission spectra | emission spectra | neutron physics | neutron physics | Johnson noise | Johnson noise | shot noise | shot noise | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | alpha decay | alpha decay | radio astrophysics | radio astrophysics | Zeeman effect | Zeeman effect | rubidium | rubidium | M?ssbauer | M?ssbauer | spectroscopy | spectroscopy | X-Ray physics | X-Ray physics | superconductivity | superconductivity | Doppler-free | Doppler-free | laser | laser

License

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8.701 Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics (MIT) 8.701 Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics (MIT)

Description

The phenomenology and experimental foundations of particle and nuclear physics are explored in this course. Emphasis is on the fundamental forces and particles, as well as composites. The phenomenology and experimental foundations of particle and nuclear physics are explored in this course. Emphasis is on the fundamental forces and particles, as well as composites.

Subjects

QED | QED | Quantum ElectroDynamics | Quantum ElectroDynamics | QFD | QFD | Quantum FlavorDynamics | Quantum FlavorDynamics | QCD | QCD | Quantum ChromoDynamics | Quantum ChromoDynamics | Relativistic Kinematics | Relativistic Kinematics | Accelerators | Accelerators | Detectors | Detectors | Quark Model | Quark Model | Lepton-Nucleon scattering | Lepton-Nucleon scattering | QFT | QFT | Quantum Field Theory | Quantum Field Theory | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | nuclear force | nuclear force | Relativistic heavy-ion physics | Relativistic heavy-ion physics | Particle astrophysics | Particle astrophysics | nuclear astrophysics | nuclear astrophysics

License

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II "Junior Lab" (MIT) II "Junior Lab" (MIT)

Description

Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring.The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics. Each term, students choose 5 different experiments from a list of 21 total labs. Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring.The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics. Each term, students choose 5 different experiments from a list of 21 total labs.

Subjects

Junior Lab | Junior Lab | experimental | experimental | atomic | atomic | nuclear | nuclear | physics | physics | optics | optics | photoelectric effect | photoelectric effect | poisson | poisson | statistics | statistics | electromagnetic pulse | electromagnetic pulse | compton scattering | compton scattering | Franck-Hertz experiment | Franck-Hertz experiment | relativistic dynamics | relativistic dynamics | nuclear magnetic resonance | nuclear magnetic resonance | spin echoes | spin echoes | cosmic-ray muons | cosmic-ray muons | Rutherford Scattering | Rutherford Scattering | emission spectra | emission spectra | neutron physics | neutron physics | Johnson noise | Johnson noise | shot noise | shot noise | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | alpha decay | alpha decay | radio astrophysics | radio astrophysics | Zeeman effect | Zeeman effect | rubidium | rubidium | M?ssbauer | M?ssbauer | spectroscopy | spectroscopy | X-Ray physics | X-Ray physics | superconductivity | superconductivity | Doppler-free | Doppler-free | laser | laser

License

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6.728 Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics (MIT) 6.728 Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics (MIT)

Description

6.728 covers concepts in elementary quantum mechanics and statistical physics. The course introduces applied quantum physics and  emphasizes an experimental basis for quantum mechanics. Concepts covered include: Schrodinger's equation applied to the free particle, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom, variational methods, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and Boltzmann distribution functions, and simple models for metals, semiconductors, and devices such as electron microscopes, scanning tunneling microscope, thermonic emitters, atomic force microscope, and others. 6.728 covers concepts in elementary quantum mechanics and statistical physics. The course introduces applied quantum physics and  emphasizes an experimental basis for quantum mechanics. Concepts covered include: Schrodinger's equation applied to the free particle, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom, variational methods, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and Boltzmann distribution functions, and simple models for metals, semiconductors, and devices such as electron microscopes, scanning tunneling microscope, thermonic emitters, atomic force microscope, and others.

Subjects

applied quantum physics | applied quantum physics | quantum physics | quantum physics | statistical physics | statistical physics | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | Schrodinger | Schrodinger | tunneling | tunneling | harmonic oscillator | harmonic oscillator | hydrogen atom | hydrogen atom | variational methods | variational methods | Fermi-Dirac | Fermi-Dirac | Bose-Einstein | Bose-Einstein | Boltzmann | Boltzmann | distribution function | distribution function | electron microscope | electron microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | thermonic emitter | thermonic emitter | atomic force microscope | atomic force microscope

License

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6.728 Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics (MIT) 6.728 Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics (MIT)

Description

6.728 is offered under the department's "Devices, Circuits, and Systems" concentration. The course covers concepts in elementary quantum mechanics and statistical physics, introduces applied quantum physics, and emphasizes an experimental basis for quantum mechanics. Concepts covered include: Schrodinger's equation applied to the free particle, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom, variational methods, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and Boltzmann distribution functions, and simple models for metals, semiconductors, and devices such as electron microscopes, scanning tunneling microscope, thermonic emitters, atomic force microscope, and others. 6.728 is offered under the department's "Devices, Circuits, and Systems" concentration. The course covers concepts in elementary quantum mechanics and statistical physics, introduces applied quantum physics, and emphasizes an experimental basis for quantum mechanics. Concepts covered include: Schrodinger's equation applied to the free particle, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom, variational methods, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and Boltzmann distribution functions, and simple models for metals, semiconductors, and devices such as electron microscopes, scanning tunneling microscope, thermonic emitters, atomic force microscope, and others.

Subjects

applied quantum physics | applied quantum physics | quantum physics | quantum physics | statistical physics | statistical physics | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | Schrodinger | Schrodinger | tunneling | tunneling | harmonic oscillator | harmonic oscillator | hydrogen atom | hydrogen atom | variational methods | variational methods | Fermi-Dirac | Fermi-Dirac | Bose-Einstein | Bose-Einstein | Boltzmann | Boltzmann | distribution function | distribution function | electron microscope | electron microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | thermonic emitter | thermonic emitter | atomic force microscope | atomic force microscope

License

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II "Junior Lab" (MIT) II "Junior Lab" (MIT)

Description

Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring. The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .mht files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The Ma Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring. The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .mht files found on this course site.MATLAB® is a trademark of The Ma

Subjects

nuclear physics | nuclear physics | atomic physics | atomic physics | experimental physics | experimental physics

License

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Physics

Description

Notre Dame OpenCourseware (OCW) offers free online educational resources for courses in the Department of Physics. Undergraduate physics majors are trained to use the most modern equipment, learn about the most current and exciting topics for research, and, most of all, learn to be problem solvers. As the "liberal arts" of the sciences, physics is a training ground for the mind which opens many avenues.

Subjects

nuclear physics | atomic physics | biophysics | ondensed matter | course | elementary particle physics | free | online | astrophysics | physics | OCW

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2.008 Design and Manufacturing II (MIT) 2.008 Design and Manufacturing II (MIT)

Description

Integration of design, engineering, and management disciplines and practices for analysis and design of manufacturing enterprises. Emphasis is on the physics and stochastic nature of manufacturing processes and systems, and their effects on quality, rate, cost, and flexibility. Topics include process physics and control, design for manufacturing, and manufacturing systems. Group project requires design and fabrication of parts using mass-production and assembly methods to produce a product in quantity. Integration of design, engineering, and management disciplines and practices for analysis and design of manufacturing enterprises. Emphasis is on the physics and stochastic nature of manufacturing processes and systems, and their effects on quality, rate, cost, and flexibility. Topics include process physics and control, design for manufacturing, and manufacturing systems. Group project requires design and fabrication of parts using mass-production and assembly methods to produce a product in quantity.

Subjects

manufacturing enterprises | manufacturing enterprises | physics | physics | stochastic nature of manufacturing processes | stochastic nature of manufacturing processes | quality | quality | rate | rate | cost | cost | flexibility | flexibility | process physics | process physics | process control | process control

License

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12.570 Structure and Dynamics of the CMB Region (MIT) 12.570 Structure and Dynamics of the CMB Region (MIT)

Description

The Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) represents one of the most important physical and chemical discontinuities of the deep Earth as it separates the solid state, convective lower mantle from the liquid outer core. In this seminar course, the instructors will examine our current understanding of the CMB region from integrated seismological, mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives. Instructors will also introduce state-of-the-art methodologies that are employed to characterize the CMB region and relevant papers will be discussed in class. Topics will include CMB detection and topography, D'' anisotropy, seismic velocity anomalies (e.g., ultra-low velocity zones), temperature, chemical reactions, phase relations, and mineral fabrications at the core-mantle boundary. These results will be i The Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) represents one of the most important physical and chemical discontinuities of the deep Earth as it separates the solid state, convective lower mantle from the liquid outer core. In this seminar course, the instructors will examine our current understanding of the CMB region from integrated seismological, mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives. Instructors will also introduce state-of-the-art methodologies that are employed to characterize the CMB region and relevant papers will be discussed in class. Topics will include CMB detection and topography, D'' anisotropy, seismic velocity anomalies (e.g., ultra-low velocity zones), temperature, chemical reactions, phase relations, and mineral fabrications at the core-mantle boundary. These results will be i

Subjects

Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) | Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) | deep Earth | deep Earth | lower mantle | lower mantle | outer core | outer core | integrated seismological | integrated seismological | mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives | mineral physics and geodynamical perspectives | CMB detection and topography | CMB detection and topography | D'' anisotropy | D'' anisotropy | seismic velocity anomalies (e.g. | seismic velocity anomalies (e.g. | ultra-low velocity zones) | ultra-low velocity zones) | temperature | temperature | chemical reactions | chemical reactions | phase relations | phase relations | mineral fabrications | mineral fabrications | cmb detection | cmb detection | topography | topography | mineral physics | mineral physics | geodynamical perspectives | geodynamical perspectives | D" Region | D" Region | ultra-low velocity zones | ultra-low velocity zones | partial melting | partial melting | mineral texture | mineral texture | core rigidity zones | core rigidity zones | sedimentation | sedimentation | mantle flow | mantle flow | core mantle coupling | core mantle coupling | geomagnetic field | geomagnetic field

License

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22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT) 22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT)

Description

The topics covered under this course include elements of nuclear physics for engineering students, basic properties of the nucleus and nuclear radiations, quantum mechanical calculations of deuteron bound-state wave function and energy, n-p scattering cross-section, transition probability per unit time and barrier transmission probability. Also explored are binding energy and nuclear stability, interactions of charged particles, neutrons, and gamma rays with matter, radioactive decays, energetics and general cross-section behavior in nuclear reactions. The topics covered under this course include elements of nuclear physics for engineering students, basic properties of the nucleus and nuclear radiations, quantum mechanical calculations of deuteron bound-state wave function and energy, n-p scattering cross-section, transition probability per unit time and barrier transmission probability. Also explored are binding energy and nuclear stability, interactions of charged particles, neutrons, and gamma rays with matter, radioactive decays, energetics and general cross-section behavior in nuclear reactions.

Subjects

Nuclear physics | Nuclear physics | Nuclear reaction | Nuclear reaction | Nucleus | Nucleus | Nuclear radiation | Nuclear radiation | Quantum mechanics | Quantum mechanics | Deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | Deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | n-p scattering cross-section | n-p scattering cross-section | Transition probability per unit time | Transition probability per unit time | Barrier transmission probability | Barrier transmission probability | Binding energy | Binding energy | Nuclear stability | Nuclear stability | Interactions of charged particles neutrons and gamma rays with matter | Interactions of charged particles neutrons and gamma rays with matter | Radioactive decay | Radioactive decay | Energetics | Energetics | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | nuclear reaction | nuclear reaction | nucleus | nucleus | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | transition probability per unit time | transition probability per unit time | barrier transmission probability | barrier transmission probability | nuclear stability | nuclear stability | Interactions of charged particles | Interactions of charged particles | neutrons | neutrons | and gamma rays with matter | and gamma rays with matter | energetics | energetics

License

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STS.042J Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century (MIT) STS.042J Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This course covers the role of physics and physicists during the 20th century, focusing on Einstein, Oppenheimer, and Feynman. Beyond just covering the scientific developments, institutional, cultural, and political contexts will also be examined. This course covers the role of physics and physicists during the 20th century, focusing on Einstein, Oppenheimer, and Feynman. Beyond just covering the scientific developments, institutional, cultural, and political contexts will also be examined.

Subjects

STS.042 | STS.042 | 8.225 | 8.225 | general relativity | general relativity | theory of relativity | theory of relativity | einstein | einstein | history of physics | history of physics | cold war | cold war | physics in the 20th century | physics in the 20th century | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | special relativity | special relativity | Heisenberg | Heisenberg | Bohr | Bohr | world war II | world war II | big science | big science | feynman | feynman

License

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science. This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

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STS.436 Cold War Science (MIT) STS.436 Cold War Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines the history and legacy of the Cold War on American science. It explores scientist's new political roles after World War II, ranging from elite policy makers in the nuclear age to victims of domestic anti Communism. It also examines the changing institutions in which the physical sciences and social sciences were conducted during the postwar decades, investigating possible epistemic effects on forms of knowledge. The subject closes by considering the place of science in the post-Cold War era. This seminar examines the history and legacy of the Cold War on American science. It explores scientist's new political roles after World War II, ranging from elite policy makers in the nuclear age to victims of domestic anti Communism. It also examines the changing institutions in which the physical sciences and social sciences were conducted during the postwar decades, investigating possible epistemic effects on forms of knowledge. The subject closes by considering the place of science in the post-Cold War era.

Subjects

cold war | cold war | history of science | history of science | nuclear age | nuclear age | post-cold-war era | post-cold-war era | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | atom bomb | atom bomb | hydrogen bomb | hydrogen bomb | atomic energy | atomic energy | McCarthyism | McCarthyism | espionage | espionage | anti-communism | anti-communism | spying | spying | soviet union | soviet union | american science | american science | HUAC | HUAC | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | arms race | arms race | disarmament | disarmament | Sputnik | Sputnik | iron curtain | iron curtain | space race | space race | globalization | globalization | capitalism | capitalism | academic freedom | academic freedom | CIA | CIA | National Security Agency | National Security Agency | NSA | NSA | military-industrial complex | military-industrial complex | quantum physics | quantum physics | physics | physics

License

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science. This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT) 8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models. Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | solar system | stars | stars | interstellar medium | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Galaxy | the Universe | the Universe | planets | planets | planet formation | planet formation | star formation | star formation | stellar evolution | stellar evolution | supernovae | supernovae | compact objects | compact objects | white dwarfs | white dwarfs | neutron stars | neutron stars | black holes | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | star clusters | globular and open clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | binary X-ray sources | gas | gas | dust | dust | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | cosmic rays | galaxy | galaxy | universe | universe | astrophysics | astrophysics | Sun | Sun | supernova | supernova | globular clusters | globular clusters | open clusters | open clusters | jets | jets | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | dynamical expansion | thermal history | thermal history | normal galaxies | normal galaxies | active galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | Greek astronomy | physics | physics | Copernicus | Copernicus | Tycho | Tycho | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | classical mechanics | classical mechanics | circular orbits | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | electromagnetic radiation | matter | matter | telescopes | telescopes | detectors | detectors | 8.282 | 8.282 | 12.402 | 12.402 | plusars | plusars | galaxies | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | normal and active galaxies | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe

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22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT) 22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT)

Description

In-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors are presented. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers. In-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors are presented. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.

Subjects

nuclear fuel cycle | nuclear fuel cycle | uranium supply | uranium supply | enrichment fuel fabrication | enrichment fuel fabrication | in-core physics | in-core physics | fuel cycle economics | fuel cycle economics | applied reactor physics | applied reactor physics | Nonproliferation aspects | Nonproliferation aspects | disposal of excess weapons plutonium | disposal of excess weapons plutonium | transmutation of actinides | transmutation of actinides | fission products | fission products | spent fuel | spent fuel

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II "Junior Lab" (MIT)

Description

Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring.The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics. Each term, students choose 5 different experiments from a list of 21 total labs.

Subjects

Junior Lab | experimental | atomic | nuclear | physics | optics | photoelectric effect | poisson | statistics | electromagnetic pulse | compton scattering | Franck-Hertz experiment | relativistic dynamics | nuclear magnetic resonance | spin echoes | cosmic-ray muons | Rutherford Scattering | emission spectra | neutron physics | Johnson noise | shot noise | quantum mechanics | alpha decay | radio astrophysics | Zeeman effect | rubidium | M?ssbauer | spectroscopy | X-Ray physics | superconductivity | Doppler-free | laser

License

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3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT) 3.016 Mathematics for Materials Scientists and Engineers (MIT)

Description

The class will cover mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from 3.012 to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, fourier analysis and random walks.Technical RequirementsMathematica® software is required to run the .nb files found on this course site. The class will cover mathematical techniques necessary for understanding of materials science and engineering topics such as energetics, materials structure and symmetry, materials response to applied fields, mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials. The class uses examples from 3.012 to introduce mathematical concepts and materials-related problem solving skills. Topics include linear algebra and orthonormal basis, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, quadratic forms, tensor operations, symmetry operations, calculus of several variables, introduction to complex analysis, ordinary and partial differential equations, theory of distributions, fourier analysis and random walks.Technical RequirementsMathematica® software is required to run the .nb files found on this course site.

Subjects

energetics | energetics | materials structure and symmetry: applied fields | materials structure and symmetry: applied fields | mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials | mechanics and physics of solids and soft materials | linear algebra | linear algebra | orthonormal basis | orthonormal basis | eigenvalues | eigenvalues | eigenvectors | eigenvectors | quadratic forms | quadratic forms | tensor operations | tensor operations | symmetry operations | symmetry operations | calculus | calculus | complex analysis | complex analysis | differential equations | differential equations | theory of distributions | theory of distributions | fourier analysis | fourier analysis | random walks | random walks | mathematical technicques | mathematical technicques | materials science | materials science | materials engineering | materials engineering | materials structure | materials structure | symmetry | symmetry | applied fields | applied fields | materials response | materials response | solids mechanics | solids mechanics | solids physics | solids physics | soft materials | soft materials | multi-variable calculus | multi-variable calculus | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | partial differential equations | partial differential equations | applied mathematics | applied mathematics | mathematical techniques | mathematical techniques

License

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3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering. This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Subjects

Interactions between proteins | Interactions between proteins | cells | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Biosensors | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Interactions between proteins | cells | Interactions between proteins | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | BE.340J | BE.340J | 3.051 | 3.051 | BE.340 | BE.340 | 20.340 | 20.340

License

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STS.042J Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century (MIT) STS.042J Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This class will study some of the changing ideas within modern physics, ranging from relativity theory and quantum mechanics to solid-state physics, nuclear and elementary particles, and cosmology. These ideas will be situated within shifting institutional, cultural, and political contexts. The overall aim is to understand the changing roles of physics and of physicists over the course of the twentieth century. This class will study some of the changing ideas within modern physics, ranging from relativity theory and quantum mechanics to solid-state physics, nuclear and elementary particles, and cosmology. These ideas will be situated within shifting institutional, cultural, and political contexts. The overall aim is to understand the changing roles of physics and of physicists over the course of the twentieth century.

Subjects

relativity theory | relativity theory | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | solid-state physics | solid-state physics | elementary particles | elementary particles | quarks | quarks | cosmology | cosmology | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | Maxwell | Maxwell | Mach | Mach | Bohr | Bohr | Heisenberg | Heisenberg | McCarthyism | McCarthyism | Poincar? | Poincar? | Schr?dinger | Schr?dinger | nuclear particles | nuclear particles | physics | physics | 20th century | 20th century | twentieth century | twentieth century | physicists | physicists | institutional | political | cultural context | institutional | political | cultural context | STS.042 | STS.042 | 8.225 | 8.225

License

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT) 8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, interstellar medium, the galaxy, and universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.Topics include: planets, planet formation; stars, the Sun, "normal" stars, star formation; stellar evolution, supernovae, compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), plusars, binary X-ray sources; star clusters, globular and open clusters; interstellar medium, gas, dust, magnetic fields, cosmic rays; distance ladder; galaxies, normal and active galaxies, jets; gravitational lensing; large scaling structure; Newtonian cosmology, dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; big-bang nucleosynthesis Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, interstellar medium, the galaxy, and universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.Topics include: planets, planet formation; stars, the Sun, "normal" stars, star formation; stellar evolution, supernovae, compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), plusars, binary X-ray sources; star clusters, globular and open clusters; interstellar medium, gas, dust, magnetic fields, cosmic rays; distance ladder; galaxies, normal and active galaxies, jets; gravitational lensing; large scaling structure; Newtonian cosmology, dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; big-bang nucleosynthesis

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | solar system | stars | stars | interstellar medium | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Galaxy | the Universe | the Universe | planets | planets | planet formation | planet formation | star formation | star formation | stellar evolution | stellar evolution | supernovae | supernovae | compact objects | compact objects | white dwarfs | white dwarfs | neutron stars | neutron stars | black holes | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | star clusters | globular and open clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | binary X-ray sources | gas | gas | dust | dust | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | cosmic rays | galaxy | galaxy | universe | universe | astrophysics | astrophysics | Sun | Sun | supernova | supernova | globular clusters | globular clusters | open clusters | open clusters | jets | jets | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | dynamical expansion | thermal history | thermal history | normal galaxies | normal galaxies | active galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | Greek astronomy | physics | physics | Copernicus | Copernicus | Tycho | Tycho | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | classical mechanics | classical mechanics | circular orbits | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | electromagnetic radiation | matter | matter | telescopes | telescopes | detectors | detectors | 8.282 | 8.282 | 12.402 | 12.402

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to the history and historiography of science from ancient Greece to the present. It is designed to serve as an introduction for those who have no prior background in the field and to deepen the knowledge of those who already do. We will consider how the history of science has responded to its encounters with philosophy, sociology, economics, and anthropology. Our readings and discussions will focus on determining what makes particular works effective, understanding major contemporary trends and debates in the history of science, and establishing resources for further research. This course offers an introduction to the history and historiography of science from ancient Greece to the present. It is designed to serve as an introduction for those who have no prior background in the field and to deepen the knowledge of those who already do. We will consider how the history of science has responded to its encounters with philosophy, sociology, economics, and anthropology. Our readings and discussions will focus on determining what makes particular works effective, understanding major contemporary trends and debates in the history of science, and establishing resources for further research.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science. This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

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II "Junior Lab" (MIT)

Description

Junior Lab consists of two undergraduate courses in experimental physics. The courses are offered by the MIT Physics Department, and are usually taken by Juniors (hence the name). Officially, the courses are called Experimental Physics I and II and are numbered 8.13 for the first half, given in the fall semester, and 8.14 for the second half, given in the spring. The purposes of Junior Lab are to give students hands-on experience with some of the experimental basis of modern physics and, in the process, to deepen their understanding of the relations between experiment and theory, mostly in atomic and nuclear physics. Each term, students choose 5 different experiments from a list of 21 total labs.

Subjects

Junior Lab | experimental | atomic | nuclear | physics | optics | photoelectric effect | poisson | statistics | electromagnetic pulse | compton scattering | Franck-Hertz experiment | relativistic dynamics | nuclear magnetic resonance | spin echoes | cosmic-ray muons | Rutherford Scattering | emission spectra | neutron physics | Johnson noise | shot noise | quantum mechanics | alpha decay | radio astrophysics | Zeeman effect | rubidium | M?ssbauer | spectroscopy | X-Ray physics | superconductivity | Doppler-free | laser

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.57 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes (MIT) 2.57 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Parallel treatments of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers, aiming at fundamental understanding and descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes from nanoscale continuously to macroscale. Topics include the energy levels, the statistical behavior and internal energy, energy transport in the forms of waves and particles, scattering and heat generation processes, Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws, deviation from classical laws at nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions, with applications in nano- and microtechnology. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Parallel treatments of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers, aiming at fundamental understanding and descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes from nanoscale continuously to macroscale. Topics include the energy levels, the statistical behavior and internal energy, energy transport in the forms of waves and particles, scattering and heat generation processes, Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws, deviation from classical laws at nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions, with applications in nano- and microtechnology.

Subjects

nanotechnology | nanotechnology | nanostructure | nanostructure | energy | energy | energy transport | energy transport | energy storage | energy storage | energy carriers | energy carriers | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | quantum physics | quantum physics | thermoelectrics | thermoelectrics | semiconductor physics | semiconductor physics | solar cells | solar cells | waves and particles | waves and particles

License

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