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2.76 Multi-Scale System Design (MIT) 2.76 Multi-Scale System Design (MIT)

Description

Multi-scale systems (MuSS) consist of components from two or more length scales (nano, micro, meso, or macro-scales). In MuSS, the engineering modeling, design principles, and fabrication processes of the components are fundamentally different. The challenge is to make these components so they are conceptually and model-wise compatible with other-scale components with which they interface. This course covers the fundamental properties of scales, design theories, modeling methods and manufacturing issues which must be addressed in these systems. Examples of MuSS include precision instruments, nanomanipulators, fiber optics, micro/nano-photonics, nanorobotics, MEMS (piezoelectric driven manipulators and optics), X-Ray telescopes and carbon nano-tube assemblies. Students master the materials Multi-scale systems (MuSS) consist of components from two or more length scales (nano, micro, meso, or macro-scales). In MuSS, the engineering modeling, design principles, and fabrication processes of the components are fundamentally different. The challenge is to make these components so they are conceptually and model-wise compatible with other-scale components with which they interface. This course covers the fundamental properties of scales, design theories, modeling methods and manufacturing issues which must be addressed in these systems. Examples of MuSS include precision instruments, nanomanipulators, fiber optics, micro/nano-photonics, nanorobotics, MEMS (piezoelectric driven manipulators and optics), X-Ray telescopes and carbon nano-tube assemblies. Students master the materials

Subjects

scale | scale | complexity | complexity | nano | micro | meso | or macro-scale | nano | micro | meso | or macro-scale | kinematics | kinematics | metrology | metrology | engineering modeling | motion | engineering modeling | motion | modeling | modeling | design | design | manufacture | manufacture | design principles | design principles | fabrication process | fabrication process | functional requirements | functional requirements | precision instruments | precision instruments | nanomanipulators | fiber optics | micro- photonics | nano-photonics | nanorobotics | MEMS | nanomanipulators | fiber optics | micro- photonics | nano-photonics | nanorobotics | MEMS | piezoelectric | transducer | actuator | sensor | piezoelectric | transducer | actuator | sensor | constraint | rigid constraint | flexible constraint | ride-flexible constraint | constraint | rigid constraint | flexible constraint | ride-flexible constraint | constaint-based design | constaint-based design | carbon nanotube | carbon nanotube | nanowire | nanowire | scanning tunneling microscope | scanning tunneling microscope | flexure | flexure | protein structure | protein structure | polymer structure | polymer structure | nanopelleting | nanopipette | nanowire | nanopelleting | nanopipette | nanowire | TMA pixel array | TMA pixel array | error modeling | error modeling | repeatability | repeatability

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.60 Symmetry, Structure, and Tensor Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.60 Symmetry, Structure, and Tensor Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the derivation of symmetry theory; lattices, point groups, space groups, and their properties; use of symmetry in tensor representation of crystal properties, including anisotropy and representation surfaces; and applications to piezoelectricity and elasticity. This course covers the derivation of symmetry theory; lattices, point groups, space groups, and their properties; use of symmetry in tensor representation of crystal properties, including anisotropy and representation surfaces; and applications to piezoelectricity and elasticity.

Subjects

crystallography | crystallography | rotation | rotation | translation | translation | lattice | lattice | plane | plane | point group | point group | space group | space group | motif | motif | glide plane | glide plane | mirror plane | mirror plane | reflection | reflection | spherical trigonometry | spherical trigonometry | binary compound | binary compound | coordination number | coordination number | ion | ion | crystal structure | crystal structure | tetrahedral | tetrahedral | octahedral | octahedral | packing | packing | monoclinic | monoclinic | triclinic | triclinic | orthorhombic | orthorhombic | cell | cell | screw axis | screw axis | eigenvector | eigenvector | stress | stress | strain | strain | anisotropy | anisotropy | anisotropic | anisotropic | piezoelectric | piezoelectric

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.836 Sensor Technologies for Interactive Environments (MIT) MAS.836 Sensor Technologies for Interactive Environments (MIT)

Description

This course is a broad introduction to a host of sensor technologies, illustrated by applications drawn from human-computer interfaces and ubiquitous computing. After extensively reviewing electronics for sensor signal conditioning, the lectures cover the principles and operation of a variety of sensor architectures and modalities, including pressure, strain, displacement, proximity, thermal, electric and magnetic field, optical, acoustic, RF, inertial, and bioelectric. Simple sensor processing algorithms and wired and wireless network standards are also discussed. Students are required to complete written assignments, a set of laboratories, and a final project. This course is a broad introduction to a host of sensor technologies, illustrated by applications drawn from human-computer interfaces and ubiquitous computing. After extensively reviewing electronics for sensor signal conditioning, the lectures cover the principles and operation of a variety of sensor architectures and modalities, including pressure, strain, displacement, proximity, thermal, electric and magnetic field, optical, acoustic, RF, inertial, and bioelectric. Simple sensor processing algorithms and wired and wireless network standards are also discussed. Students are required to complete written assignments, a set of laboratories, and a final project.

Subjects

human-computer interaction | human-computer interaction | analog electronics | analog electronics | digital electronics | digital electronics | sensing | sensing | piezoelectric | piezoelectric | optical sensor | optical sensor | inertial sensor | inertial sensor | sensor network | sensor network | electronic monitoring | electronic monitoring

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.S079 Nanomaker (MIT) 6.S079 Nanomaker (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course links clean energy sources and storage technology to energy consumption case studies to give students a concept of the full circle of production and consumption. Specifically, photovoltaic, organic photovoltaic, piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity sources are applied to electrophoresis, lab on a chip, and paper microfluidic applications–relevant analytical techniques in biology and chemistry. Hands-on experimentation with everyday materials and equipment help connect the theory with the implementation. Complementary laboratories fabricating LEDs, organic LEDs and spectrometers introduce the diagnostic tools used to characterize energy efficiency.This course is one of many OCW Energy Courses, and it is an elective Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course links clean energy sources and storage technology to energy consumption case studies to give students a concept of the full circle of production and consumption. Specifically, photovoltaic, organic photovoltaic, piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity sources are applied to electrophoresis, lab on a chip, and paper microfluidic applications–relevant analytical techniques in biology and chemistry. Hands-on experimentation with everyday materials and equipment help connect the theory with the implementation. Complementary laboratories fabricating LEDs, organic LEDs and spectrometers introduce the diagnostic tools used to characterize energy efficiency.This course is one of many OCW Energy Courses, and it is an elective

Subjects

clean energy | clean energy | energy sources | energy sources | energy storage | energy storage | energy consumption | energy consumption | photovoltaic | photovoltaic | piezoelectric | piezoelectric | thermoelectric | thermoelectric | LED | LED | light emitting diode | light emitting diode | organic LED | organic LED | analytical biology | analytical biology | analytical chemistry | analytical chemistry | microfluidics | microfluidics | spectrometer | spectrometer | energy efficiency | energy efficiency

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.836 Sensor Technologies for Interactive Environments (MIT) MAS.836 Sensor Technologies for Interactive Environments (MIT)

Description

This course is a broad introduction to a host of sensor technologies, illustrated by applications drawn from human-computer interfaces and ubiquitous computing. After extensively reviewing electronics for sensor signal conditioning, the lectures cover the principles and operation of a variety of sensor architectures and modalities, including pressure, strain, displacement, proximity, thermal, electric and magnetic field, optical, acoustic, RF, inertial, and bioelectric. Simple sensor processing algorithms and wired and wireless network standards are also discussed. Students are required to complete written assignments, a set of laboratories, and a final project. This course is a broad introduction to a host of sensor technologies, illustrated by applications drawn from human-computer interfaces and ubiquitous computing. After extensively reviewing electronics for sensor signal conditioning, the lectures cover the principles and operation of a variety of sensor architectures and modalities, including pressure, strain, displacement, proximity, thermal, electric and magnetic field, optical, acoustic, RF, inertial, and bioelectric. Simple sensor processing algorithms and wired and wireless network standards are also discussed. Students are required to complete written assignments, a set of laboratories, and a final project.

Subjects

human-computer interaction | human-computer interaction | analog electronics | analog electronics | digital electronics | digital electronics | sensing | sensing | piezoelectric | piezoelectric | optical sensor | optical sensor | inertial sensor | inertial sensor | sensor network | sensor network | electronic monitoring | electronic monitoring

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.836 Sensor Technologies for Interactive Environments (MIT)

Description

This course is a broad introduction to a host of sensor technologies, illustrated by applications drawn from human-computer interfaces and ubiquitous computing. After extensively reviewing electronics for sensor signal conditioning, the lectures cover the principles and operation of a variety of sensor architectures and modalities, including pressure, strain, displacement, proximity, thermal, electric and magnetic field, optical, acoustic, RF, inertial, and bioelectric. Simple sensor processing algorithms and wired and wireless network standards are also discussed. Students are required to complete written assignments, a set of laboratories, and a final project.

Subjects

human-computer interaction | analog electronics | digital electronics | sensing | piezoelectric | optical sensor | inertial sensor | sensor network | electronic monitoring

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Functional Behaviour of Materials: Piezoelectric Materials

Description

This set of animations introduces piezoelectric materials, their properties and applications. From TLP: Piezoelectric Materials

Subjects

piezoelectric | polarisation | polarization | dipole | gas lighter | PZT | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | animation | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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2.76 Multi-Scale System Design (MIT)

Description

Multi-scale systems (MuSS) consist of components from two or more length scales (nano, micro, meso, or macro-scales). In MuSS, the engineering modeling, design principles, and fabrication processes of the components are fundamentally different. The challenge is to make these components so they are conceptually and model-wise compatible with other-scale components with which they interface. This course covers the fundamental properties of scales, design theories, modeling methods and manufacturing issues which must be addressed in these systems. Examples of MuSS include precision instruments, nanomanipulators, fiber optics, micro/nano-photonics, nanorobotics, MEMS (piezoelectric driven manipulators and optics), X-Ray telescopes and carbon nano-tube assemblies. Students master the materials

Subjects

scale | complexity | nano | micro | meso | or macro-scale | kinematics | metrology | engineering modeling | motion | modeling | design | manufacture | design principles | fabrication process | functional requirements | precision instruments | nanomanipulators | fiber optics | micro- photonics | nano-photonics | nanorobotics | MEMS | piezoelectric | transducer | actuator | sensor | constraint | rigid constraint | flexible constraint | ride-flexible constraint | constaint-based design | carbon nanotube | nanowire | scanning tunneling microscope | flexure | protein structure | polymer structure | nanopelleting | nanopipette | nanowire | TMA pixel array | error modeling | repeatability

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.60 Symmetry, Structure, and Tensor Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the derivation of symmetry theory; lattices, point groups, space groups, and their properties; use of symmetry in tensor representation of crystal properties, including anisotropy and representation surfaces; and applications to piezoelectricity and elasticity.

Subjects

crystallography | rotation | translation | lattice | plane | point group | space group | motif | glide plane | mirror plane | reflection | spherical trigonometry | binary compound | coordination number | ion | crystal structure | tetrahedral | octahedral | packing | monoclinic | triclinic | orthorhombic | cell | screw axis | eigenvector | stress | strain | anisotropy | anisotropic | piezoelectric

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.836 Sensor Technologies for Interactive Environments (MIT)

Description

This course is a broad introduction to a host of sensor technologies, illustrated by applications drawn from human-computer interfaces and ubiquitous computing. After extensively reviewing electronics for sensor signal conditioning, the lectures cover the principles and operation of a variety of sensor architectures and modalities, including pressure, strain, displacement, proximity, thermal, electric and magnetic field, optical, acoustic, RF, inertial, and bioelectric. Simple sensor processing algorithms and wired and wireless network standards are also discussed. Students are required to complete written assignments, a set of laboratories, and a final project.

Subjects

human-computer interaction | analog electronics | digital electronics | sensing | piezoelectric | optical sensor | inertial sensor | sensor network | electronic monitoring

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.S079 Nanomaker (MIT)

Description

This course links clean energy sources and storage technology to energy consumption case studies to give students a concept of the full circle of production and consumption. Specifically, photovoltaic, organic photovoltaic, piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity sources are applied to electrophoresis, lab on a chip, and paper microfluidic applications–relevant analytical techniques in biology and chemistry. Hands-on experimentation with everyday materials and equipment help connect the theory with the implementation. Complementary laboratories fabricating LEDs, organic LEDs and spectrometers introduce the diagnostic tools used to characterize energy efficiency.This course is one of many OCW Energy Courses, and it is an elective subject in MIT’s undergraduate Energy Studies Min

Subjects

clean energy | energy sources | energy storage | energy consumption | photovoltaic | piezoelectric | thermoelectric | LED | light emitting diode | organic LED | analytical biology | analytical chemistry | microfluidics | spectrometer | energy efficiency

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Functional Behaviour of Materials: Piezoelectric Materials

Description

This set of animations introduces piezoelectric materials, their properties and applications. From TLP: Piezoelectric Materials

Subjects

piezoelectric | polarisation | polarization | dipole | gas lighter | pzt | doitpoms | university of cambridge | animation | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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