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1

Who did Plato (not) love?

Description

Platonic love? Plato's main text on love, the Symposium, takes a broad look at what love means, offering a serious yet humorous, poignant and flippant, literary philosophical discussion of the topic, with some famous but also surprising outcomes. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | love | plato | romance | platonic | symposium | philosophy | love | plato | romance | platonic | symposium | 2011-02-14

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Who did Plato (not) love?

Description

Platonic love? Plato's main text on love, the Symposium, takes a broad look at what love means, offering a serious yet humorous, poignant and flippant, literary philosophical discussion of the topic, with some famous but also surprising outcomes. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | love | plato | romance | platonic | symposium | philosophy | love | plato | romance | platonic | symposium | 2011-02-14

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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1.2 The Background of Early Modern Philosophy

Description

Part 1.2. Gives a very brief history of philosophy from the 'birth of philosophy' in Ancient Greece through the rise of Christianity in Europe in the Middle Ages through to the Renaissance, the Reformation and the birth of the Modern Period. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

epicureans | stoics | plato | philosophy | christianity | renaissance | aquinas | aristotle | middle ages | epicureans | stoics | plato | philosophy | christianity | renaissance | aquinas | aristotle | middle ages

License

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21W.747-3 Classical Rhetoric and Modern Politics (MIT) 21W.747-3 Classical Rhetoric and Modern Politics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the history, theory, practice, and implications of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion. The course is designed to let you practice your own rhetorical prowess. This combination of reading, speaking, and writing will help you succeed in: Learning to read and think critically. Learning techniques of rhetorical analysis. Learning techniques of argument. Learning and practicing some basics about oral presentation. This course is an introduction to the history, theory, practice, and implications of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion. The course is designed to let you practice your own rhetorical prowess. This combination of reading, speaking, and writing will help you succeed in: Learning to read and think critically. Learning techniques of rhetorical analysis. Learning techniques of argument. Learning and practicing some basics about oral presentation.

Subjects

classical rhetoric | classical rhetoric | modern politics | modern politics | aristotle | aristotle | rhetoric | rhetoric | cicero | cicero | plato | plato | gorgias | gorgias | rhetorica ad alexandrum | rhetorica ad alexandrum | persuasion | persuasion | oral presentation | oral presentation | CI-intensive | CI-intensive | Brown vs. Board of Education | Brown vs. Board of Education | Roe vs. Wade | Roe vs. Wade | politics | politics | argument | argument

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.230 Meta-ethics (MIT) 24.230 Meta-ethics (MIT)

Description

This course considers a range of philosophical questions about the foundations of morality, such as whether and in what sense morality is objective, the nature of moral discourse, and how we can come to know right from wrong. This course considers a range of philosophical questions about the foundations of morality, such as whether and in what sense morality is objective, the nature of moral discourse, and how we can come to know right from wrong.

Subjects

moral statements | moral statements | morality | morality | ethics | ethics | ethical inquiry | ethical inquiry | scientific inquiry | scientific inquiry | right and wrong | right and wrong | moral realism | moral realism | plato | plato | naturalism | naturalism | moral anti-realism | moral anti-realism | non-cognitivism | non-cognitivism | reason | reason

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT) CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT)

Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp

Subjects

hacking | hacking | trolling | trolling | hacker | hacker | troll | troll | mass-murder | mass-murder | bully | bully | deviance | deviance | deviant | deviant | new media | new media | old media | old media | middle-aged media | middle-aged media | media | media | technology | technology | behavior | behavior | otaku | otaku | artifact | artifact | politics | politics | society | society | outsiders | outsiders | marihuana | marihuana | control | control | moral | moral | panic | panic | writing | writing | print | print | plato | plato | phaedrus | phaedrus | jowett | jowett | conciousness | conciousness | orality | orality | literacy | literacy | anxieties | anxieties | anxiety | anxiety | modernity | modernity | penny | penny | dreadful | dreadful | juvenile | juvenile | crime | crime | delinquency | delinquency | delinquent | delinquent | children | children | television | television | chip | chip | regulation | regulation | seduction | seduction | innocence | innocence | innocent | innocent | movies | movies | film | film | Marx | Marx | Engles | Engles | Jenkins | Jenkins | ruling | ruling | lass | lass | gender | gender | youth | youth | sex | sex | violence | violence | digital | digital | threat | threat | treat | treat | affect | affect | virus | virus | body | body | stupid | stupid | facebook | facebook | bookface | bookface | google | google | internet | internet | book | book | identity | identity | deception | deception | virtual | virtual | community | community | flesh | flesh | reddit | reddit | vigilante | vigilante | weirdness | weirdness | crackdown | crackdown | Sterling | Sterling | Doctorow | Doctorow | pornography | pornography | predator | predator | porn | porn | terror | terror | terrorism | terrorism | grief | grief | resistance | resistance | drama | drama | teen | teen | gossip | gossip | network | network | public | public | private | private | video | video | game | game | videogame | videogame | columbine | columbine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.450 Literature and Ethical Values (MIT) 21L.450 Literature and Ethical Values (MIT)

Description

The aim of this subject is to acquaint the student with some important works of systematic ethical philosophy and to bring to bear the viewpoint of those works on the study of classic works of literature. This subject will trace the history of ethical speculation in systematic philosophy by identifying four major positions: two from the ancient world and the two most important traditions of ethical philosophy since the renaissance. The two ancient positions will be represented by Plato and Aristotle, the two modern positions by Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill. We will try to understand these four positions as engaged in a rivalry with one another, and we will also engage with the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes, which offers a bridge between ancient and modern conceptions and provides The aim of this subject is to acquaint the student with some important works of systematic ethical philosophy and to bring to bear the viewpoint of those works on the study of classic works of literature. This subject will trace the history of ethical speculation in systematic philosophy by identifying four major positions: two from the ancient world and the two most important traditions of ethical philosophy since the renaissance. The two ancient positions will be represented by Plato and Aristotle, the two modern positions by Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill. We will try to understand these four positions as engaged in a rivalry with one another, and we will also engage with the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes, which offers a bridge between ancient and modern conceptions and provides

Subjects

ethics | ethics | values | values | literature | literature | morality | morality | justice | justice | virtue | virtue | literary theory | literary theory | responsibility | responsibility | politics | politics | plato | plato | aristotle | aristotle | machiavelli | machiavelli | hobbes | hobbes | sophocles | sophocles | euripides | euripides | shapkespeare | shapkespeare | swift | swift | ibsen | ibsen | shaw | shaw | dostoyevsky | dostoyevsky | conrad | conrad | bible | bible

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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s Philosophy of Art

Description

James Grant, lecturer in philosop-hy, University of Oxford gives his first lecture in the Aesthetics series on Plato's philosophy of Art. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

art | plato | philosophy | aesthetics | art | plato | philosophy | aesthetics

License

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21L.422 Tragedy (MIT) 21L.422 Tragedy (MIT)

Description

"Tragedy" is a name originally applied to a particular kind of dramatic art and subsequently to other literary forms; it has also been applied to particular events, often implying thereby a particular view of life. Throughout the history of Western literature it has sustained this double reference. Uniquely and insistently, the realm of the tragic encompasses both literature and life.Through careful, critical reading of literary texts, this subject will examine three aspects of the tragic experience:    the scapegoatthe tragic herothe ethical crisisThese aspects of the tragic will be pursued in readings that range in the reference of their materials from the warfare of the ancient world to the experience of the modern extermination camps. "Tragedy" is a name originally applied to a particular kind of dramatic art and subsequently to other literary forms; it has also been applied to particular events, often implying thereby a particular view of life. Throughout the history of Western literature it has sustained this double reference. Uniquely and insistently, the realm of the tragic encompasses both literature and life.Through careful, critical reading of literary texts, this subject will examine three aspects of the tragic experience:    the scapegoatthe tragic herothe ethical crisisThese aspects of the tragic will be pursued in readings that range in the reference of their materials from the warfare of the ancient world to the experience of the modern extermination camps.

Subjects

literature | literature | tragedy | tragedy | western literature | western literature | critcal thought | critcal thought | ethics | ethics | ancient history | ancient history | modern | modern | war | war | sophocles | sophocles | euripides | euripides | plato | plato | shakespeare | shakespeare | balzac | balzac | melville | melville | conrad | conrad | ibsen | ibsen | fitzgerals | fitzgerals | dinesen | dinesen | camus | camus | literary theory | literary theory | nietzsche | nietzsche | coppolla | coppolla | power | power | scapegoat | scapegoat | hero | hero

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.2 The Background of Early Modern Philosophy

Description

Part 1.2. Gives a very brief history of philosophy from the 'birth of philosophy' in Ancient Greece through the rise of Christianity in Europe in the Middle Ages through to the Renaissance, the Reformation and the birth of the Modern Period. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

epicureans | stoics | plato | philosophy | christianity | renaissance | aquinas | aristotle | middle ages | epicureans | stoics | plato | philosophy | christianity | renaissance | aquinas | aristotle | middle ages

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.03 Introduction to Political Thought (MIT) 17.03 Introduction to Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and the questions they raise about the design of the political and social order. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader conversation about human goods and needs, justice, democracy, and the proper relationship of the individual to the state. One aim will be to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various regimes and philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville. This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and the questions they raise about the design of the political and social order. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader conversation about human goods and needs, justice, democracy, and the proper relationship of the individual to the state. One aim will be to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various regimes and philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | social order | social order | history | history | justice | justice | democracy | democracy | state | state | philosophy | philosophy | plato | plato | aristotle | aristotle | machiavelli | machiavelli | hobbes | hobbes | locke | locke | rousseau | rousseau | marx | marx | de tocqueville | de tocqueville | individual | individual | political science | political science | political philosophy | political philosophy | politics | politics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.849 Geometric Folding Algorithms: Linkages, Origami, Polyhedra (MIT) 6.849 Geometric Folding Algorithms: Linkages, Origami, Polyhedra (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course focuses on the algorithms for analyzing and designing geometric foldings. Topics include reconfiguration of foldable structures, linkages made from one-dimensional rods connected by hinges, folding two-dimensional paper (origami), and unfolding and folding three-dimensional polyhedra. Applications to architecture, robotics, manufacturing, and biology are also covered in this course. Acknowledgments Thanks to videographers Martin Demaine and Jayson Lynch. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course focuses on the algorithms for analyzing and designing geometric foldings. Topics include reconfiguration of foldable structures, linkages made from one-dimensional rods connected by hinges, folding two-dimensional paper (origami), and unfolding and folding three-dimensional polyhedra. Applications to architecture, robotics, manufacturing, and biology are also covered in this course. Acknowledgments Thanks to videographers Martin Demaine and Jayson Lynch.

Subjects

origami | origami | geometry | geometry | algorithm | algorithm | folding | folding | linkage | linkage | polyhedra | polyhedra | seam | seam | crease pattern | crease pattern | universal molecule | universal molecule | box pleating | box pleating | triangulation | triangulation | vertex | vertex | edge | edge | curved crease | curved crease | rigidity | rigidity | tensegrity | tensegrity | hinged dissection | hinged dissection | unfolding | unfolding | gluing | gluing | platonic solid | platonic solid | refolding | refolding | sculpture | sculpture | paper | paper | 3D chain | 3D chain | design | design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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General Philosophy

Description

A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise the 8-week General Philosophy course and were delivered in late 2009.

Subjects

simple-podcasting | tpi3 | philosophy | millican | slides | powerpoint | checked1 | identity | locke | hume | mind | body | waismann | parfit | reid | memory | ancestral relations | sorites argument | leibniz | free will | determinism | sentimentalism | freedom | moral responsibility | libertarianism | necessity | causal | freedom determinism | choice | hobbes | compatibalism | ethics | frankfurt | perception | realism | idealism | phenomenalism | austin | strawson | berkeley | knowledge | boyle | ayer | peception | dualism | descartes | scepticism | skepticism | truth | ryle | meditations | induction | experience | reason | reichenbach | mellor | primary qualities | secondary qualities | ideas | epistemology | belief | putnam | gettier | moore | infinite regress | logic | external world | kant | immanuel kant | history | david hume | malebranche | god | causation | empiricism | rationalism | human understanding | treatise | government | corpuscularian | corpuscles | mathematics | atoms | science | newton | gravity | physics | civil war | leviathan | materialism | aristotle | renaissance | astronomy | society | religion | christianity | galileo | plato | stoics | epicureans | middle ages | aquinas | ontology | he - historical and philosophical studies | v500 | v380 | v511 | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT)

Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp

Subjects

hacking | trolling | hacker | troll | mass-murder | bully | deviance | deviant | new media | old media | middle-aged media | media | technology | behavior | otaku | artifact | politics | society | outsiders | marihuana | control | moral | panic | writing | print | plato | phaedrus | jowett | conciousness | orality | literacy | anxieties | anxiety | modernity | penny | dreadful | juvenile | crime | delinquency | delinquent | children | television | chip | regulation | seduction | innocence | innocent | movies | film | Marx | Engles | Jenkins | ruling | lass | gender | youth | sex | violence | digital | threat | treat | affect | virus | body | stupid | facebook | bookface | google | internet | book | identity | deception | virtual | community | flesh | reddit | vigilante | weirdness | crackdown | Sterling | Doctorow | pornography | predator | porn | terror | terrorism | grief | resistance | drama | teen | gossip | network | public | private | video | game | videogame | columbine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.2 The Background of Early Modern Philosophy

Description

Part 1.2. Gives a very brief history of philosophy from the 'birth of philosophy' in Ancient Greece through the rise of Christianity in Europe in the Middle Ages through to the Renaissance, the Reformation and the birth of the Modern Period.

Subjects

plato | aristotle | stoics | epicureans | christianity | middle ages | renaissance | philosophy | aquinas | v500 | ukoer | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Epictetus, Plato and the Olympics

Description

Aristotle was a big fan of the Ancient Games, describing a young man's ultimate physical beauty as: "a body capable of enduring all efforts, either of the racecourse or of bodily strength...This is why the athletes in the pentathlon are most beautiful." (Aristotle, Rhetoric1361b)

Subjects

oxb:060111:020dd | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality. cc-by | creative commons | UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | epitetus | plato | Aristotle | philosophy | The Olympics Ethics and Values.

License

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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6.849 Geometric Folding Algorithms: Linkages, Origami, Polyhedra (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the algorithms for analyzing and designing geometric foldings. Topics include reconfiguration of foldable structures, linkages made from one-dimensional rods connected by hinges, folding two-dimensional paper (origami), and unfolding and folding three-dimensional polyhedra. Applications to architecture, robotics, manufacturing, and biology are also covered in this course. Acknowledgments Thanks to videographers Martin Demaine and Jayson Lynch.

Subjects

origami | geometry | algorithm | folding | linkage | polyhedra | seam | crease pattern | universal molecule | box pleating | triangulation | vertex | edge | curved crease | rigidity | tensegrity | hinged dissection | unfolding | gluing | platonic solid | refolding | sculpture | paper | 3D chain | design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.03 Introduction to Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and the questions they raise about the design of the political and social order. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader conversation about human goods and needs, justice, democracy, and the proper relationship of the individual to the state. One aim will be to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various regimes and philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville.

Subjects

political theory | social order | history | justice | democracy | state | philosophy | plato | aristotle | machiavelli | hobbes | locke | rousseau | marx | de tocqueville | individual | political science | political philosophy | politics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.03 Introduction to Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and the questions they raise about the design of the political and social order. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader conversation about human goods and needs, justice, democracy, and the proper relationship of the individual to the state. One aim will be to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various regimes and philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville.

Subjects

political theory | social order | history | justice | democracy | state | philosophy | plato | aristotle | machiavelli | hobbes | locke | rousseau | marx | de tocqueville | individual | political science | political philosophy | politics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT)

Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp

Subjects

hacking | trolling | hacker | troll | mass-murder | bully | deviance | deviant | new media | old media | middle-aged media | media | technology | behavior | otaku | artifact | politics | society | outsiders | marihuana | control | moral | panic | writing | print | plato | phaedrus | jowett | conciousness | orality | literacy | anxieties | anxiety | modernity | penny | dreadful | juvenile | crime | delinquency | delinquent | children | television | chip | regulation | seduction | innocence | innocent | movies | film | Marx | Engles | Jenkins | ruling | lass | gender | youth | sex | violence | digital | threat | treat | affect | virus | body | stupid | facebook | bookface | google | internet | book | identity | deception | virtual | community | flesh | reddit | vigilante | weirdness | crackdown | Sterling | Doctorow | pornography | predator | porn | terror | terrorism | grief | resistance | drama | teen | gossip | network | public | private | video | game | videogame | columbine

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Epictetus, Plato and the Olympics

Description

Aristotle was a big fan of the Ancient Games, describing a young man's ultimate physical beauty as: "a body capable of enduring all efforts, either of the racecourse or of bodily strength...This is why the athletes in the pentathlon are most beautiful." (Aristotle, Rhetoric1361b)

Subjects

oxb:060111:020dd | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality. cc-by | creative commons | UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | epitetus | plato | Aristotle | philosophy | The Olympics Ethics and Values.

License

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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Winners of a student porcelain painting competition

Description

Taideteollisuuskeskuskoulun oppilastyönäyttely, 1895. Porsliininmaalauskilpailun kolme parasta. TaiKV:15:001 Aalto-yliopisto / Aalto University Tiedätkö lisää tästä kuvasta? Jätä kommentti tai ota yhteyttä sähköpostitse: raami@aalto.fi Lisätietoja kuvakokoelmista / more information: lib.aalto.fi/en/materials/images/

Subjects

plato | porcelain | porcelana | aalto | aaltouniversity | 1895

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Introduction to Philosophy

Description

This course introduces students to the major topics, problems, and methods of philosophy and surveys the writings of a number of major historical figures in the field. Several of the core areas of philosophy are explored, including metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, ethics, and the philosophy of religion. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Philosophy 101)

Subjects

philosophy | aristotle | descartes | bertrand russell | argument | metaphysics | epistemology | plato | rationalism | locke | empiricism | kant | copernican revolution | enlightenment | daoist | zhuangzi | political | social contract | marx | confucius | virtue | utilitarian | ethics | religion | immortality | nietzsche | buddha | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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The Philosophy of Death

Description

This course provides an in-depth introduction to the philosophical problems surrounding death; it is organized around the lectures of Shelly Kagan, Professor of Philosophy at Yale University, who develops his own philosophy of death over the length of the course. Its major purpose, aside from familiarizing the student with the writings of major philosophers on the subject of death, is to teach one how to think about death philosophically—to decide what to believe about death and to provide careful and convincing arguments for those beliefs. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Philosophy 201)

Subjects

metaphysics | death | monism | dualism | soul | free will | descartes | plato | identity | immortality | john locke | existentialism | michel de montaigne | jonathan swift | epicureanism | suicide | euthanasia | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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21L.450 Literature and Ethical Values (MIT)

Description

The aim of this subject is to acquaint the student with some important works of systematic ethical philosophy and to bring to bear the viewpoint of those works on the study of classic works of literature. This subject will trace the history of ethical speculation in systematic philosophy by identifying four major positions: two from the ancient world and the two most important traditions of ethical philosophy since the renaissance. The two ancient positions will be represented by Plato and Aristotle, the two modern positions by Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill. We will try to understand these four positions as engaged in a rivalry with one another, and we will also engage with the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes, which offers a bridge between ancient and modern conceptions and provides

Subjects

ethics | values | literature | morality | justice | virtue | literary theory | responsibility | politics | plato | aristotle | machiavelli | hobbes | sophocles | euripides | shapkespeare | swift | ibsen | shaw | dostoyevsky | conrad | bible

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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