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21M.785 Playwrights' Workshop (MIT) 21M.785 Playwrights' Workshop (MIT)

Description

This course provides continued work in the development of play scripts for the theater. Writers work on sustained pieces in weekly workshop meetings, individual consultation with the instructor, and in collaboration with student actors, directors, and designers. Fully developed scripts are eligible for inclusion in the Playwrights' Workshop Production. This course provides continued work in the development of play scripts for the theater. Writers work on sustained pieces in weekly workshop meetings, individual consultation with the instructor, and in collaboration with student actors, directors, and designers. Fully developed scripts are eligible for inclusion in the Playwrights' Workshop Production.

Subjects

theater | theater | play | play | script | script | plot | plot | one-act play | one-act play | theatrical | theatrical | acting | acting | playwright | playwright | character | character | pacing | pacing | student play | student play

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.785 Playwrights' Workshop (MIT) 21M.785 Playwrights' Workshop (MIT)

Description

This course provides continued work in the development of play scripts for the theater. Writers work on sustained pieces in weekly workshop meetings, individual consultation with the instructor, and in collaboration with student actors, directors, and designers. Fully developed scripts are eligible for inclusion in the Playwrights' Workshop Production. This course provides continued work in the development of play scripts for the theater. Writers work on sustained pieces in weekly workshop meetings, individual consultation with the instructor, and in collaboration with student actors, directors, and designers. Fully developed scripts are eligible for inclusion in the Playwrights' Workshop Production.

Subjects

theater | theater | play | play | script | script | plot | plot | one-act play | one-act play | theatrical | theatrical | acting | acting | playwright | playwright | character | character | pacing | pacing | student play | student play

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT) 7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT)

Description

Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current

Subjects

evolution | evolution | biocatalyst | biocatalyst | mutation | mutation | library | library | recombination | recombination | directed evolution | directed evolution | enzyme | enzyme | point mutation | point mutation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | DNA | DNA | gene | gene | complementation | complementation | affinity | affinity | phage | phage | ribosome display | ribosome display | yeast surface display | yeast surface display | bacterial cell surface display | bacterial cell surface display | IVC | IVC | FACS | FACS | active site | active site

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | drama | forbidden plays | forbidden plays | Modern America | Modern America | decision alley | decision alley | drama strategies | drama strategies | drama skills | drama skills | purchasing institution | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activity | drama activities | drama activities | writing opportunity | writing opportunity | last wolf | last wolf | learning medium | learning medium | literacy activities | literacy activities | writing opportunities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | foundation stage | assessment focus | assessment focus | two long lines | two long lines | dramatic activity | dramatic activity | action conventions | action conventions | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre | theatre | censorship | censorship | blacklist | blacklist | banned | banned | obscenity | obscenity | architecture | architecture | selective realism | selective realism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.604 Playwriting I (MIT) 21M.604 Playwriting I (MIT)

Description

This class introduces the craft of writing for the theater. Through weekly assignments, in class writing exercises, and work on a sustained piece, students explore scene structure, action, events, voice, and dialogue. We examine produced playscripts and discuss student work. This class's emphasis is on process, risk-taking, and finding one's own voice and vision. This class introduces the craft of writing for the theater. Through weekly assignments, in class writing exercises, and work on a sustained piece, students explore scene structure, action, events, voice, and dialogue. We examine produced playscripts and discuss student work. This class's emphasis is on process, risk-taking, and finding one's own voice and vision.

Subjects

script | script | playwright | playwright | play writing | play writing | writing | writing | characters | characters | plot | plot | action | action | sound | sound | scene | scene | act | act | dialogue | dialogue | plays | plays

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.785 Playwrights' Workshop (MIT)

Description

This course provides continued work in the development of play scripts for the theater. Writers work on sustained pieces in weekly workshop meetings, individual consultation with the instructor, and in collaboration with student actors, directors, and designers. Fully developed scripts are eligible for inclusion in the Playwrights' Workshop Production.

Subjects

theater | play | script | plot | one-act play | theatrical | acting | playwright | character | pacing | student play

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Tragedie Of Cymbeline.

Description

ePub version of text THE TRAGEDIE OF CYMBELINE. / Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616.

Subjects

oxford text archive | ota | plays | playwright | england | 16th century | ukoer | oxford text archive | ota | plays | playwright | england | 16th century

License

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15.S50 How to Win at Texas Hold'em Poker (MIT)

Description

Offered during MIT's Independent Activites Period (IAP), this short course covers the poker concepts, math concepts, and general concepts needed to play the game of Texas Hold'em on a professional level. IAP is a special 4-week term in January that provides members of the MIT community including students, faculty, staff, and alums with an opportunity to organize, sponsor and participate in a wide variety of activities and topics that are often outside of the regular MIT curriculum. Faculty Advisor: Paul Mende

Subjects

poker | poker theory | poker analytics | strategy | tounament play | poker psychology | decision-making | gameplay | pokerstars | wagering | analytical technique | pre-flop analysis | economics | no limit | ?em | preflop | 3-betting | check-raising | floating | sizing | implied odds | polarization | ICM theory | data mining in poker | law of large numbers | Nash equilibrium | decisions vs. results | exploitative play | balanced play | risk management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Description

Humanitas Inaugural Keynote Lecture - Athol Fugard: "Defining Moments" - in his life and work. Venue: Simpkins Lee Lecture Theatre, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

screenplay | tsotsi | playwright | south africa | fugard | writing | novel | #greatwriters | film | screenplay | tsotsi | playwright | south africa | fugard | writing | novel | #greatwriters | film | 2010-11-13

License

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9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT) 9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT)

Description

Relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include: functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory. In order to improve writing skills in describing experiments and reviewing journal publications in neuroscience, students are required to complete four homework assignments and one literature review with revision. Technical RequirementsMedia player software, such as Quicktime Player, RealOne Player, or Windows Media Player, is required to run the .mp3 files found on this cou Relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include: functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory. In order to improve writing skills in describing experiments and reviewing journal publications in neuroscience, students are required to complete four homework assignments and one literature review with revision. Technical RequirementsMedia player software, such as Quicktime Player, RealOne Player, or Windows Media Player, is required to run the .mp3 files found on this cou

Subjects

functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sleep | dreaming | motivation | reward | emotional displays | higher functions" | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sleep | dreaming | motivation | reward | emotional displays | higher functions" | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | functional neuroanatomy | functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sensory systems | sleep | sleep | dreaming | dreaming | motivation | motivation | reward | reward | emotional displays | emotional displays | higher functions | higher functions | neocortex | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | neural processes in learning and memory | Neurobehavior | Neurobehavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.S50 Poker Theory and Analytics (MIT) 15.S50 Poker Theory and Analytics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course takes a broad-based look at poker theory and applications of poker analytics to investment management and trading.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT in January. IAP provides members of the MIT community including students, faculty, staff, and alums with an opportunity to organize, sponsor and participate in a wide variety of activities and topics that are often outside of the regular MIT curriculum. Faculty Advisor: Paul Mende Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course takes a broad-based look at poker theory and applications of poker analytics to investment management and trading.This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT in January. IAP provides members of the MIT community including students, faculty, staff, and alums with an opportunity to organize, sponsor and participate in a wide variety of activities and topics that are often outside of the regular MIT curriculum. Faculty Advisor: Paul Mende

Subjects

poker | poker | poker theory | poker theory | poker analytics | poker analytics | investment management | investment management | trading | trading | strategy | strategy | tounament play | tounament play | poker psychology | poker psychology | decision-making | decision-making | gameplay | gameplay | pokerstars | pokerstars | wagering | wagering | analytical technique | analytical technique | pre-flop analysis | pre-flop analysis | economics | economics | no limit | no limit | Texas Hold’em | Texas Hold’em

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Description

Humanitas Inaugural Keynote Lecture - Athol Fugard: "Defining Moments" - in his life and work. Venue: Simpkins Lee Lecture Theatre, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

screenplay | tsotsi | playwright | south africa | fugard | writing | novel | #greatwriters | film | screenplay | tsotsi | playwright | south africa | fugard | writing | novel | #greatwriters | film | 2010-11-13

License

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Lecture 3: Where Do Game Ideas Come From? Lecture 3: Where Do Game Ideas Come From?

Description

Description: The assigned readings introduced two frameworks for designing games: formal abstract design and MDA (Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics). Students play a primitive board game and apply these analytic tools, then modify the rules and repeat the exercise. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: mechanics, dynamics, aesthetics, narrative, strategy, formal abstract design, MDA, game design tools, player experience, ludology, social games, board games, design constraints, playtesting, iterative designTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: The assigned readings introduced two frameworks for designing games: formal abstract design and MDA (Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics). Students play a primitive board game and apply these analytic tools, then modify the rules and repeat the exercise. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: mechanics, dynamics, aesthetics, narrative, strategy, formal abstract design, MDA, game design tools, player experience, ludology, social games, board games, design constraints, playtesting, iterative designTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

mechanics | mechanics | dynamics | dynamics | aesthetics | aesthetics | narrative | narrative | strategy | strategy | formal abstract design | formal abstract design | MDA | MDA | game design tools | game design tools | player experience | player experience | ludology | ludology | social games | social games | board games | board games | design constraints | design constraints | playtesting | playtesting | iterative design | iterative design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 4: Prototyping Lecture 4: Prototyping

Description

Description: Before games come to market, they undergo several tests: Are there technical glitches? Can players easily get started? Is the gameplay what the designers intended? Sara Verrilli discusses how and why to conduct focus testing. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: playtesting, prototyping, strategy, user feedback, technical testing, design specification, player experience, focus testing, usability testing, target audience, accessibility, marketing, surveys, data collection, board games, video games, card games, teamwork, diplomacy, dynamic, aesthetic, mechanicTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Before games come to market, they undergo several tests: Are there technical glitches? Can players easily get started? Is the gameplay what the designers intended? Sara Verrilli discusses how and why to conduct focus testing. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: playtesting, prototyping, strategy, user feedback, technical testing, design specification, player experience, focus testing, usability testing, target audience, accessibility, marketing, surveys, data collection, board games, video games, card games, teamwork, diplomacy, dynamic, aesthetic, mechanicTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

playtesting | playtesting | prototyping | prototyping | strategy | strategy | user feedback | user feedback | technical testing | technical testing | design specification | design specification | player experience | player experience | focus testing | focus testing | usability testing | usability testing | target audience | target audience | accessibility | accessibility | marketing | marketing | surveys | surveys | data collection | data collection | board games | board games | video games | video games | card games | card games | teamwork | teamwork | diplomacy | diplomacy | dynamic | dynamic | aesthetic | aesthetic | mechanic | mechanic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 12: Knowing Your Players Lecture 12: Knowing Your Players

Description

Description: Today's reading analyzes user motivation along two axes: interest in the world vs. fellow players, gaining knowledge vs. proficiency. Students discuss the utility of this taxonomy, how games encourage these interactions, and come up with their own frames. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: strategy, competition, cooperation, feedback loop, playtesting, target audience, strategy, decision tree, randomness, roleplaying, achievements, worldbuilding, virtual economy, learning curve, determinism, griefing, game theoryTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Today's reading analyzes user motivation along two axes: interest in the world vs. fellow players, gaining knowledge vs. proficiency. Students discuss the utility of this taxonomy, how games encourage these interactions, and come up with their own frames. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: strategy, competition, cooperation, feedback loop, playtesting, target audience, strategy, decision tree, randomness, roleplaying, achievements, worldbuilding, virtual economy, learning curve, determinism, griefing, game theoryTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

strategy | strategy | competition | competition | cooperation | cooperation | feedback loop | feedback loop | playtesting | playtesting | target audience | target audience | decision tree | decision tree | randomness | randomness | roleplaying | roleplaying | achievements | achievements | worldbuilding | worldbuilding | virtual economy | virtual economy | learning curve | learning curve | determinism | determinism | griefing | griefing | game theory | game theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.785 Playwrights' Workshop (MIT)

Description

This course provides continued work in the development of play scripts for the theater. Writers work on sustained pieces in weekly workshop meetings, individual consultation with the instructor, and in collaboration with student actors, directors, and designers. Fully developed scripts are eligible for inclusion in the Playwrights' Workshop Production.

Subjects

theater | play | script | plot | one-act play | theatrical | acting | playwright | character | pacing | student play

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.608 Game Design (MIT) CMS.608 Game Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is built around practical instruction in the design and analysis of non-­digital games. It provides students the texts, tools, references, and historical context to analyze and compare game designs across a variety of genres. In teams, students design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games to better understand the interaction and evolution of game rules. Covers various genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, card games, schoolyard games, board games, and role-­playing games. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is built around practical instruction in the design and analysis of non-­digital games. It provides students the texts, tools, references, and historical context to analyze and compare game designs across a variety of genres. In teams, students design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games to better understand the interaction and evolution of game rules. Covers various genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, card games, schoolyard games, board games, and role-­playing games.

Subjects

game | game | design | design | board | board | cards | cards | sport | sport | prototyping | prototyping | dice | dice | usability | usability | constraint | constraint | playground | playground | stratego | stratego | strategy | strategy | random | random | choice | choice | play | play | tabletop | tabletop | monopoly | monopoly | indoor | indoor | mechanic | mechanic | simulation | simulation | pitch | pitch | strategery | strategery | cooperative | cooperative | social | social | lockbox | lockbox | pandemic | pandemic | rules | rules | indie | indie

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Witch Of Edmonton

Description

Witchcraft and bigamy. A collaborative play about witchcraft, bigamy - and a talking Dog - what more could you want? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

witchcraft | playwright | literature | theatre | elizabethan | play | witchcraft | playwright | literature | theatre | elizabethan | play | 2015-11-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Description

Jocelyn McGregor describes her glass resin piece and bent metal at the Ruskin Degree Show 2010. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

bent metal | light sources | resin | glass | prism | displays | display | bent metal | light sources | resin | glass | prism | displays | display

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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A Chaste Maid in Cheapside: Thomas Middleton

Description

This lecture discusses comedy, fertility, and all those illegitimate children in this play about sex, economics and meat. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

language | play | theatre | elizabethan | playwright | literature | language | play | theatre | elizabethan | playwright | literature | 2015-10-26

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Alchemist: Ben Jonson

Description

Written in the context of plague in London, The Alchemist?s plot and language are deeply concerned with speed and speculation. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

language | theatre | elizabethan | play | playwright | english | language | theatre | elizabethan | play | playwright | english | 2015-10-19

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Dr Faustus: Christopher Marlowe

Description

My lecture on this infernal play discusses Elizabethan religion, the revisions to the play, and whether we should think about James Bond in its final minutes. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

language | theatre | elizabethan | play | playwright | english | language | theatre | elizabethan | play | playwright | english | 12/10/2015

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Capt. R. Norris Williams, Capt. Watson M. Washburn (LOC) Capt. R. Norris Williams, Capt. Watson M. Washburn (LOC)

Description

Subjects

libraryofcongress | libraryofcongress | watsonmcleanwashburn | watsonmcleanwashburn | watsonmwashburn | watsonmwashburn | watsonwashburn | watsonwashburn | wmwashburn | wmwashburn | washburn | washburn | tennis | tennis | tennisplayer | tennisplayer | tennisplayers | tennisplayers | doubles | doubles | richarddicknorriswilliamsii | richarddicknorriswilliamsii | richardnorriswilliamsii | richardnorriswilliamsii | richardnwilliamsii | richardnwilliamsii | richardwilliamsii | richardwilliamsii | rnwilliamsii | rnwilliamsii | dickwilliams | dickwilliams | richarddicknorriswilliams | richarddicknorriswilliams | richardnorriswilliams | richardnorriswilliams | rnwilliams | rnwilliams | richardwilliams | richardwilliams | williams | williams

License

No known copyright restrictions

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