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Lecture 2: Iterative Design Lecture 2: Iterative Design

Description

Description: This lecture begins by exploring what a game is (and isn't) and defining the terms "mechanic" and "dynamic". Designers identify the core mechanic and dynamic of a game to help guide iterative playtesting and optimization. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: rules, strategy, iterative design, playtesting, core mechanic, core dynamic, game design tools, emergent behavior, brainstorming, user feedbackTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: This lecture begins by exploring what a game is (and isn't) and defining the terms "mechanic" and "dynamic". Designers identify the core mechanic and dynamic of a game to help guide iterative playtesting and optimization. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: rules, strategy, iterative design, playtesting, core mechanic, core dynamic, game design tools, emergent behavior, brainstorming, user feedbackTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

rules | rules | strategy | strategy | iterative design | iterative design | playtesting | playtesting | core mechanic | core mechanic | core dynamic | core dynamic | game design tools | game design tools | emergent behavior | emergent behavior | brainstorming | brainstorming | user feedback | user feedback

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 3: Where Do Game Ideas Come From? Lecture 3: Where Do Game Ideas Come From?

Description

Description: The assigned readings introduced two frameworks for designing games: formal abstract design and MDA (Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics). Students play a primitive board game and apply these analytic tools, then modify the rules and repeat the exercise. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: mechanics, dynamics, aesthetics, narrative, strategy, formal abstract design, MDA, game design tools, player experience, ludology, social games, board games, design constraints, playtesting, iterative designTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: The assigned readings introduced two frameworks for designing games: formal abstract design and MDA (Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics). Students play a primitive board game and apply these analytic tools, then modify the rules and repeat the exercise. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: mechanics, dynamics, aesthetics, narrative, strategy, formal abstract design, MDA, game design tools, player experience, ludology, social games, board games, design constraints, playtesting, iterative designTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

mechanics | mechanics | dynamics | dynamics | aesthetics | aesthetics | narrative | narrative | strategy | strategy | formal abstract design | formal abstract design | MDA | MDA | game design tools | game design tools | player experience | player experience | ludology | ludology | social games | social games | board games | board games | design constraints | design constraints | playtesting | playtesting | iterative design | iterative design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 4: Prototyping Lecture 4: Prototyping

Description

Description: Before games come to market, they undergo several tests: Are there technical glitches? Can players easily get started? Is the gameplay what the designers intended? Sara Verrilli discusses how and why to conduct focus testing. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: playtesting, prototyping, strategy, user feedback, technical testing, design specification, player experience, focus testing, usability testing, target audience, accessibility, marketing, surveys, data collection, board games, video games, card games, teamwork, diplomacy, dynamic, aesthetic, mechanicTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Before games come to market, they undergo several tests: Are there technical glitches? Can players easily get started? Is the gameplay what the designers intended? Sara Verrilli discusses how and why to conduct focus testing. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: playtesting, prototyping, strategy, user feedback, technical testing, design specification, player experience, focus testing, usability testing, target audience, accessibility, marketing, surveys, data collection, board games, video games, card games, teamwork, diplomacy, dynamic, aesthetic, mechanicTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

playtesting | playtesting | prototyping | prototyping | strategy | strategy | user feedback | user feedback | technical testing | technical testing | design specification | design specification | player experience | player experience | focus testing | focus testing | usability testing | usability testing | target audience | target audience | accessibility | accessibility | marketing | marketing | surveys | surveys | data collection | data collection | board games | board games | video games | video games | card games | card games | teamwork | teamwork | diplomacy | diplomacy | dynamic | dynamic | aesthetic | aesthetic | mechanic | mechanic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 9: Strategy, Skill, and Chance, Part 2 Lecture 9: Strategy, Skill, and Chance, Part 2

Description

Description: This lecture reviews the concepts of information flow and uncertainty, analyzing well-known games in these terms. Examples include Scrabble, Go Fish, Mario Kart, Monopoly, chess, poker, War, and Settlers of Catan. Next, students consider feedback loops. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: complexity, determinism, randomness, uncertainty, strategy, games of skill, games of chance, playtesting, information theory, risk, game state, board games, probability, cybernetics, positive feedback loop, negative feedback loopTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: This lecture reviews the concepts of information flow and uncertainty, analyzing well-known games in these terms. Examples include Scrabble, Go Fish, Mario Kart, Monopoly, chess, poker, War, and Settlers of Catan. Next, students consider feedback loops. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: complexity, determinism, randomness, uncertainty, strategy, games of skill, games of chance, playtesting, information theory, risk, game state, board games, probability, cybernetics, positive feedback loop, negative feedback loopTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

complexity | complexity | determinism | determinism | randomness | randomness | uncertainty | uncertainty | strategy | strategy | games of skill | games of skill | games of chance | games of chance | playtesting | playtesting | information theory | information theory | risk | risk | game state | game state | board games | board games | probability | probability | cybernetics | cybernetics | positive feedback loop | positive feedback loop | negative feedback loop | negative feedback loop

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 12: Knowing Your Players Lecture 12: Knowing Your Players

Description

Description: Today's reading analyzes user motivation along two axes: interest in the world vs. fellow players, gaining knowledge vs. proficiency. Students discuss the utility of this taxonomy, how games encourage these interactions, and come up with their own frames. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: strategy, competition, cooperation, feedback loop, playtesting, target audience, strategy, decision tree, randomness, roleplaying, achievements, worldbuilding, virtual economy, learning curve, determinism, griefing, game theoryTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Today's reading analyzes user motivation along two axes: interest in the world vs. fellow players, gaining knowledge vs. proficiency. Students discuss the utility of this taxonomy, how games encourage these interactions, and come up with their own frames. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: strategy, competition, cooperation, feedback loop, playtesting, target audience, strategy, decision tree, randomness, roleplaying, achievements, worldbuilding, virtual economy, learning curve, determinism, griefing, game theoryTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

strategy | strategy | competition | competition | cooperation | cooperation | feedback loop | feedback loop | playtesting | playtesting | target audience | target audience | decision tree | decision tree | randomness | randomness | roleplaying | roleplaying | achievements | achievements | worldbuilding | worldbuilding | virtual economy | virtual economy | learning curve | learning curve | determinism | determinism | griefing | griefing | game theory | game theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 21: Games as Teaching Tools Lecture 21: Games as Teaching Tools

Description

Description: A panel of game developers from the Education Arcade and Learning Games Network talk about their research, effectively connecting learning and games, engaging a target audience, defining and evaluating success, and common design pitfalls. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Konstantin Mitgutsch, Dan Roy, Scot OsterweilKeywords: education, target audience, accessibility, literacy, user feedback, evaluation, playtesting, prototyping, usability, math, science, language, puzzles, teaching, pedagogy, learningTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: A panel of game developers from the Education Arcade and Learning Games Network talk about their research, effectively connecting learning and games, engaging a target audience, defining and evaluating success, and common design pitfalls. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Konstantin Mitgutsch, Dan Roy, Scot OsterweilKeywords: education, target audience, accessibility, literacy, user feedback, evaluation, playtesting, prototyping, usability, math, science, language, puzzles, teaching, pedagogy, learningTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

education | education | target audience | target audience | accessibility | accessibility | literacy | literacy | user feedback | user feedback | evaluation | evaluation | playtesting | playtesting | prototyping | prototyping | usability | usability | math | math | science | science | language | language | puzzles | puzzles | teaching | teaching | pedagogy | pedagogy | learning | learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.608 Game Design (MIT) CMS.608 Game Design (MIT)

Description

An historical examination and analysis of the evolution and development of games and game mechanics. Topics include a large breadth of genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, schoolyard games, board games, roleplaying games, and digital games. Students submit essays documenting research and analysis of a variety of traditional and eclectic games. Project teams required to design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games. An historical examination and analysis of the evolution and development of games and game mechanics. Topics include a large breadth of genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, schoolyard games, board games, roleplaying games, and digital games. Students submit essays documenting research and analysis of a variety of traditional and eclectic games. Project teams required to design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games.

Subjects

a | a | games | games | narrative | narrative | playtesting | playtesting | student work | student work | student notes | student notes | chance | chance | competition | competition | information | information | probability | probability | strategy | strategy | theory | theory | symbolism | symbolism | rules | rules | gambling | gambling | emergence | emergence | progression | progression | randomness | randomness | cooperation | cooperation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.608 Game Design (MIT)

Description

An historical examination and analysis of the evolution and development of games and game mechanics. Topics include a large breadth of genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, schoolyard games, board games, roleplaying games, and digital games. Students submit essays documenting research and analysis of a variety of traditional and eclectic games. Project teams required to design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games.

Subjects

a | games | narrative | playtesting | student work | student notes | chance | competition | information | probability | strategy | theory | symbolism | rules | gambling | emergence | progression | randomness | cooperation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 2: Iterative Design

Description

Description: This lecture begins by exploring what a game is (and isn't) and defining the terms "mechanic" and "dynamic". Designers identify the core mechanic and dynamic of a game to help guide iterative playtesting and optimization. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: rules, strategy, iterative design, playtesting, core mechanic, core dynamic, game design tools, emergent behavior, brainstorming, user feedbackTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

rules | strategy | iterative design | playtesting | core mechanic | core dynamic | game design tools | emergent behavior | brainstorming | user feedback

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 3: Where Do Game Ideas Come From?

Description

Description: The assigned readings introduced two frameworks for designing games: formal abstract design and MDA (Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics). Students play a primitive board game and apply these analytic tools, then modify the rules and repeat the exercise. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: mechanics, dynamics, aesthetics, narrative, strategy, formal abstract design, MDA, game design tools, player experience, ludology, social games, board games, design constraints, playtesting, iterative designTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

mechanics | dynamics | aesthetics | narrative | strategy | formal abstract design | MDA | game design tools | player experience | ludology | social games | board games | design constraints | playtesting | iterative design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 4: Prototyping

Description

Description: Before games come to market, they undergo several tests: Are there technical glitches? Can players easily get started? Is the gameplay what the designers intended? Sara Verrilli discusses how and why to conduct focus testing. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: playtesting, prototyping, strategy, user feedback, technical testing, design specification, player experience, focus testing, usability testing, target audience, accessibility, marketing, surveys, data collection, board games, video games, card games, teamwork, diplomacy, dynamic, aesthetic, mechanicTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

playtesting | prototyping | strategy | user feedback | technical testing | design specification | player experience | focus testing | usability testing | target audience | accessibility | marketing | surveys | data collection | board games | video games | card games | teamwork | diplomacy | dynamic | aesthetic | mechanic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 9: Strategy, Skill, and Chance, Part 2

Description

Description: This lecture reviews the concepts of information flow and uncertainty, analyzing well-known games in these terms. Examples include Scrabble, Go Fish, Mario Kart, Monopoly, chess, poker, War, and Settlers of Catan. Next, students consider feedback loops. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: complexity, determinism, randomness, uncertainty, strategy, games of skill, games of chance, playtesting, information theory, risk, game state, board games, probability, cybernetics, positive feedback loop, negative feedback loopTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

complexity | determinism | randomness | uncertainty | strategy | games of skill | games of chance | playtesting | information theory | risk | game state | board games | probability | cybernetics | positive feedback loop | negative feedback loop

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 12: Knowing Your Players

Description

Description: Today's reading analyzes user motivation along two axes: interest in the world vs. fellow players, gaining knowledge vs. proficiency. Students discuss the utility of this taxonomy, how games encourage these interactions, and come up with their own frames. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: strategy, competition, cooperation, feedback loop, playtesting, target audience, strategy, decision tree, randomness, roleplaying, achievements, worldbuilding, virtual economy, learning curve, determinism, griefing, game theoryTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

strategy | competition | cooperation | feedback loop | playtesting | target audience | decision tree | randomness | roleplaying | achievements | worldbuilding | virtual economy | learning curve | determinism | griefing | game theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 21: Games as Teaching Tools

Description

Description: A panel of game developers from the Education Arcade and Learning Games Network talk about their research, effectively connecting learning and games, engaging a target audience, defining and evaluating success, and common design pitfalls. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Konstantin Mitgutsch, Dan Roy, Scot OsterweilKeywords: education, target audience, accessibility, literacy, user feedback, evaluation, playtesting, prototyping, usability, math, science, language, puzzles, teaching, pedagogy, learningTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

education | target audience | accessibility | literacy | user feedback | evaluation | playtesting | prototyping | usability | math | science | language | puzzles | teaching | pedagogy | learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 2: Iterative Design

Description

Description: This lecture begins by exploring what a game is (and isn't) and defining the terms "mechanic" and "dynamic". Designers identify the core mechanic and dynamic of a game to help guide iterative playtesting and optimization. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: rules, strategy, iterative design, playtesting, core mechanic, core dynamic, game design tools, emergent behavior, brainstorming, user feedbackTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

rules | strategy | iterative design | playtesting | core mechanic | core dynamic | game design tools | emergent behavior | brainstorming | user feedback

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 3: Where Do Game Ideas Come From?

Description

Description: The assigned readings introduced two frameworks for designing games: formal abstract design and MDA (Mechanics-Dynamics-Aesthetics). Students play a primitive board game and apply these analytic tools, then modify the rules and repeat the exercise. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: mechanics, dynamics, aesthetics, narrative, strategy, formal abstract design, MDA, game design tools, player experience, ludology, social games, board games, design constraints, playtesting, iterative designTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

mechanics | dynamics | aesthetics | narrative | strategy | formal abstract design | MDA | game design tools | player experience | ludology | social games | board games | design constraints | playtesting | iterative design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 4: Prototyping

Description

Description: Before games come to market, they undergo several tests: Are there technical glitches? Can players easily get started? Is the gameplay what the designers intended? Sara Verrilli discusses how and why to conduct focus testing. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: playtesting, prototyping, strategy, user feedback, technical testing, design specification, player experience, focus testing, usability testing, target audience, accessibility, marketing, surveys, data collection, board games, video games, card games, teamwork, diplomacy, dynamic, aesthetic, mechanicTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

playtesting | prototyping | strategy | user feedback | technical testing | design specification | player experience | focus testing | usability testing | target audience | accessibility | marketing | surveys | data collection | board games | video games | card games | teamwork | diplomacy | dynamic | aesthetic | mechanic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 9: Strategy, Skill, and Chance, Part 2

Description

Description: This lecture reviews the concepts of information flow and uncertainty, analyzing well-known games in these terms. Examples include Scrabble, Go Fish, Mario Kart, Monopoly, chess, poker, War, and Settlers of Catan. Next, students consider feedback loops. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: complexity, determinism, randomness, uncertainty, strategy, games of skill, games of chance, playtesting, information theory, risk, game state, board games, probability, cybernetics, positive feedback loop, negative feedback loopTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

complexity | determinism | randomness | uncertainty | strategy | games of skill | games of chance | playtesting | information theory | risk | game state | board games | probability | cybernetics | positive feedback loop | negative feedback loop

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 12: Knowing Your Players

Description

Description: Today's reading analyzes user motivation along two axes: interest in the world vs. fellow players, gaining knowledge vs. proficiency. Students discuss the utility of this taxonomy, how games encourage these interactions, and come up with their own frames. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: strategy, competition, cooperation, feedback loop, playtesting, target audience, strategy, decision tree, randomness, roleplaying, achievements, worldbuilding, virtual economy, learning curve, determinism, griefing, game theoryTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

strategy | competition | cooperation | feedback loop | playtesting | target audience | decision tree | randomness | roleplaying | achievements | worldbuilding | virtual economy | learning curve | determinism | griefing | game theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 21: Games as Teaching Tools

Description

Description: A panel of game developers from the Education Arcade and Learning Games Network talk about their research, effectively connecting learning and games, engaging a target audience, defining and evaluating success, and common design pitfalls. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Konstantin Mitgutsch, Dan Roy, Scot OsterweilKeywords: education, target audience, accessibility, literacy, user feedback, evaluation, playtesting, prototyping, usability, math, science, language, puzzles, teaching, pedagogy, learningTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

education | target audience | accessibility | literacy | user feedback | evaluation | playtesting | prototyping | usability | math | science | language | puzzles | teaching | pedagogy | learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.608 Game Design (MIT)

Description

An historical examination and analysis of the evolution and development of games and game mechanics. Topics include a large breadth of genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, schoolyard games, board games, roleplaying games, and digital games. Students submit essays documenting research and analysis of a variety of traditional and eclectic games. Project teams required to design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games.

Subjects

a | games | narrative | playtesting | student work | student notes | chance | competition | information | probability | strategy | theory | symbolism | rules | gambling | emergence | progression | randomness | cooperation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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