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21L.705 Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: "Paradise Lost" and Twentieth-Century Fantasy (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: "Paradise Lost" and Twentieth-Century Fantasy (MIT)

Description

What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work. What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work.

Subjects

Genesis | Genesis | Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | Renaissance literature | Renaissance literature | medieval literature | medieval literature | poetry | poetry | epic poetry | epic poetry | religious poetry | religious poetry | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary analysis | literary analysis | Philip Pullman | Philip Pullman | The Golden Compass | The Golden Compass | His Dark Materials | His Dark Materials | William Blake | William Blake | Biblical analysis | Biblical analysis | Bible | Bible | seminar course | seminar course | discussion | discussion | Twentieth-Centry Fantasy | Twentieth-Centry Fantasy | Rewriting Genesis | Rewriting Genesis

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT)

Description

William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well. William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well.

Subjects

W. B. Yeats | W. B. Yeats | William Butler Yeats | William Butler Yeats | Irish poetry | Irish poetry | poetry | poetry | female poets | female poets | Patrick Kavanagh | Patrick Kavanagh | Louis MacNeice | Louis MacNeice | John Hewitt | John Hewitt | Richard Murphy | Richard Murphy | John Montague | John Montague | Seamus Heaney | Seamus Heaney | Michael Hartnett | Michael Hartnett | Derek Mahon | Derek Mahon | Paul Durcan | Paul Durcan | Paul Muldoon | Paul Muldoon | Ciaran Carson | Ciaran Carson | Paula Meehan | Paula Meehan | Medbh McGuckian | Medbh McGuckian | Boland | Boland | Rita Ann Higgins | Rita Ann Higgins | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | round table discussion | round table discussion | poetry discussion | poetry discussion | literary analysis | literary analysis

License

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21L.705 Major Authors: John Milton (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: John Milton (MIT)

Description

In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source. Students should come to the seminar having read Paradise Lost straight through at least once; this can be accomplished by taking the IAP subject, Reading Paradise Lost (21L.995), or independently. Twentieth century au In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source. Students should come to the seminar having read Paradise Lost straight through at least once; this can be accomplished by taking the IAP subject, Reading Paradise Lost (21L.995), or independently. Twentieth century au

Subjects

John Milton | John Milton | Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | Renaissance literature | Renaissance literature | medieval literature | medieval literature | poetry | poetry | epic poetry | epic poetry | religious poetry | religious poetry | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary analysis | literary analysis | Philip Pullman | Philip Pullman | The Golden Compass | The Golden Compass | His Dark Materials | His Dark Materials | William Blake | William Blake | Biblical analysis | Biblical analysis | Bible | Bible | Genesis | Genesis | seminar course | seminar course | discussion | discussion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.261 Poetry in Translation (MIT) SP.261 Poetry in Translation (MIT)

Description

This seminar addresses the inherent challenges of translating poetry from different languages, cultures, and eras. Students do some translation of their own, though accommodations are made if a student lacks even a basic knowledge of any foreign language. This seminar addresses the inherent challenges of translating poetry from different languages, cultures, and eras. Students do some translation of their own, though accommodations are made if a student lacks even a basic knowledge of any foreign language.

Subjects

translating poetry | translation | poetry | English | French | Spanish | Latin | Russian | Japanese | Chinese | Persian | literature | historical background | foreign culture | translating poetry | translation | poetry | English | French | Spanish | Latin | Russian | Japanese | Chinese | Persian | literature | historical background | foreign culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Tower Poetry 2013: Swimming in Loch Suili; The Lake of Shadows

Description

Eva Wallace reads her entry for the 2013 Tower Poetry Competition. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

tower poetry | literature | poetry | tower poetry | literature | poetry

License

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Tower Poetry 2013: The Devil

Description

Erin Tunney reads her entry to the 2013 Tower Poetry Competition. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

tower poetry | literature | poetry | tower poetry | literature | poetry

License

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Tower Poetry 2013: Investigation Details; Echo and Narcissus

Description

Kathryn Cussons reads her entry to the 2013 Tower Poetry competition. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

tower poetry | literature | poetry | tower poetry | literature | poetry

License

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Tower Poetry 2013: Origins

Description

Azfa Ali reads her entry to the 2013 Tower Poetry Competition. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

tower poetry | literature | poetry | tower poetry | literature | poetry

License

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About the Tower Poetry Summer School

Description

Find out more about the Tower Poetry Summer School - 2012 tutor, Alan Gillis, talks to participant, Camille Ralphs about the value of the summer school and how approachable it is. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poetry | tower poetry | christ church college | poetry | tower poetry | christ church college

License

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So, how does it feel to win?

Description

Ashani Lewis (winner of the 2016 Christopher Tower Poetry competition) talks to one of the judges, Katherine Rundell, about how it feels to have won first prize. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poetry | tower poetry | christ church college | poetry | tower poetry | christ church college

License

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21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT) 21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT)

Description

"Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, "Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion,

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | literary art | literary art | language | language | aethetic | aethetic | meaning | meaning | poetic drama | poetic drama | hymns | hymns | lyrics | lyrics | history | history | rhetoric | rhetoric | song | song | drama | drama | comedy | comedy | verse | verse | form | form | rhyme | rhyme | prose | prose | musical | musical | ambiguity | ambiguity | symbolism | symbolism | world | world | irony | irony | style | style | stylistic | stylistic | poetic diction | poetic diction | simile | simile | connections | connections | cultures | cultures | genres | genres | elements of poetry | elements of poetry | lines | lines | stanzas | stanzas | English love sonnets | English love sonnets | sound | sound | figuration | figuration | literary tradition | literary tradition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The most amazing experience

Description

Ashani Lewis (winner of the 2016 Christopher Tower Poetry competition) talks to one of the judges, Katherine Rundell, about the experience of winning in 2016. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poetry | tower poetry | christ church | poetry | tower poetry | christ church

License

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From being unplaced in the 2015 competition to winning in 2016.

Description

Ashani Lewis (winner of the 2016 Christopher Tower Poetry competition) talks to one of the judges, Katherine Rundell, about how she went from being unplaced in the 2015 competition to winning in 2016. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poetry | tower poetry | christ church college | poetry | tower poetry | christ church college

License

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Let the poem come to you

Description

Ashani Lewis (winner of the 2016 Christopher Tower Poetry competition) talks to one of the judges, Katherine Rundell, about she went from being unplaced in the 2015 competition to winning in 2016. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poetry | tower poetry | christ church college | poetry | tower poetry | christ church college

License

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Description

Ashani Lewis (winner of the 2016 Christopher Tower Poetry competition) talks to one of the judges, Katherine Rundell, about how she went from being unplaced in the 2015 competition to winning in 2016. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poetry | tower poetry | christ church college | poetry | tower poetry | christ church college

License

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Tower Poetry 2016: Driving Lesson

Description

Commended winner of the 2016 Christopher Tower Poetry competition, Ed Pryor, reads his poem 'Driving Lesson'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poetry | tower poetry | christ church college | poetry | tower poetry | christ church college

License

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Tower Poetry 2016: Nine Days

Description

Commended winner of the 2016 Christopher Tower Poetry competition, Natasha Blinder, reads her poem 'Nine Days' Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poetry | tower poetry | christ church college | poetry | tower poetry | christ church college

License

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Tower Poetry 2016: The Awakening

Description

Commended winner of the 2016 Christopher Tower Poetry competition, Sophia West, reads her poem 'The Awakening'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poetry | tower poetry | christ church college | poetry | tower poetry | christ church college

License

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Tower Poetry 2016: UFO Beach Abduction

Description

Commended winner of the 2016 Christopher Tower Poetry competition, Grace Fraser, reads her poem 'UFO Beach Abduction'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poetry | tower poetry | christ church college | poetry | tower poetry | christ church college

License

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Tower Poetry 2016: Flowers From The Dark

Description

Winner of the 2016 Christopher Tower Poetry competition, Ashani Lewis, reads her poem 'Flowers From The Dark' Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poetry | tower poetry | christ church college | poetry | tower poetry | christ church college

License

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21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Beyond the Limits of the Lyric (MIT) 21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Beyond the Limits of the Lyric (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we'll read individual poems closely within a set of questions about the moral and political position of poetry -- and of intellectuals -- in different cultural contexts. Of course, part of the divergence in the social positions of poetry [and of 'the aesthetic'] depends on the dominant paradigm of the social, political and literary culture; part of the divergence derives from the momentum of literary development in the culture [how did the culture experience modernism?, for instance], and part depends on the different attitudes toward traditional form. We read poets from North America (Whitman, Williams, Lowell, Plath, Bishop), from South America (Neruda), from Western Europe (Yeats), and Eastern Europe (Akhmatova, Szymborska); we conclude with a month dedicated to the w In this seminar we'll read individual poems closely within a set of questions about the moral and political position of poetry -- and of intellectuals -- in different cultural contexts. Of course, part of the divergence in the social positions of poetry [and of 'the aesthetic'] depends on the dominant paradigm of the social, political and literary culture; part of the divergence derives from the momentum of literary development in the culture [how did the culture experience modernism?, for instance], and part depends on the different attitudes toward traditional form. We read poets from North America (Whitman, Williams, Lowell, Plath, Bishop), from South America (Neruda), from Western Europe (Yeats), and Eastern Europe (Akhmatova, Szymborska); we conclude with a month dedicated to the w

Subjects

moral and political position of poetry | moral and political position of poetry | divergence in the social positions of poetry | divergence in the social positions of poetry | dominant paradigm of the social | political and literary culture | dominant paradigm of the social | political and literary culture | Whitman | Whitman | Williams | Williams | Lowell | Lowell | Plath | Plath | Bishop | Bishop | Czeslaw Milosz | Czeslaw Milosz | poet | poet | Yeats | Yeats | Nerud | Nerud | Akhmatova | Akhmatova | Szymborska | Szymborska

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.772 Digital Poetry (MIT) 21W.772 Digital Poetry (MIT)

Description

This class investigates theory and practice of digital or new media poetry with emphasis on workshop review of digital poetry created by students. Each week students examine published examples of digital poetry in a variety of forms including but not limited to soundscapes, hypertext poetry, animation, code poems, interactive games, location-based poems using handheld devices, digital video and wikis. This class investigates theory and practice of digital or new media poetry with emphasis on workshop review of digital poetry created by students. Each week students examine published examples of digital poetry in a variety of forms including but not limited to soundscapes, hypertext poetry, animation, code poems, interactive games, location-based poems using handheld devices, digital video and wikis.

Subjects

Digital | Digital | poetry | poetry | theory | theory | practice | practice | new media | new media | workshop | workshop | soundscapes | soundscapes | hypertext poetry | hypertext poetry | animation | animation | code poems | code poems | interactive games | interactive games | location-based poems | location-based poems | handheld devices | handheld devices | digital video | digital video | wikis | wikis | essays | essays | experimental art | experimental art

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.756 Writing and Reading Poems (MIT) 21W.756 Writing and Reading Poems (MIT)

Description

This course is an examination of the formal structural and textual variety in poetry. Students engage in extensive practice in the making of poems and the analysis of both students' manuscripts and 20th-century poetry. The course attempts to make relevant the traditional elements of poetry and their contemporary alternatives. There are weekly writing assignments, including some exercises in prosody. This course is an examination of the formal structural and textual variety in poetry. Students engage in extensive practice in the making of poems and the analysis of both students' manuscripts and 20th-century poetry. The course attempts to make relevant the traditional elements of poetry and their contemporary alternatives. There are weekly writing assignments, including some exercises in prosody.

Subjects

poetry | poetry | essay writing | essay writing | creative writing | creative writing | imitation | imitation | contemporary poetry | contemporary poetry

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: Gender and Lyric -- Renaissance Men and Women Writing about Love (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: Gender and Lyric -- Renaissance Men and Women Writing about Love (MIT)

Description

The core of this seminar will be the great sequences of English love sonnets written by William Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Mary Wroth. These poems cover an enormous amount of aesthetic and psychological ground: ranging from the utterly subjective to the entirely public or conventional, from licit to forbidden desires, they might also serve as a manual of experimentation with the resources of sound, rhythm, and figuration in poetry. Around these sequences, we will develop several other contexts, using both Renaissance texts and modern accounts: the Petrarchan literary tradition (poems by Francis Petrarch and Sir Thomas Wyatt); the social, political, and ethical uses of love poetry (seduction, getting famous, influencing policy, elevating morals, compensating for failure The core of this seminar will be the great sequences of English love sonnets written by William Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Mary Wroth. These poems cover an enormous amount of aesthetic and psychological ground: ranging from the utterly subjective to the entirely public or conventional, from licit to forbidden desires, they might also serve as a manual of experimentation with the resources of sound, rhythm, and figuration in poetry. Around these sequences, we will develop several other contexts, using both Renaissance texts and modern accounts: the Petrarchan literary tradition (poems by Francis Petrarch and Sir Thomas Wyatt); the social, political, and ethical uses of love poetry (seduction, getting famous, influencing policy, elevating morals, compensating for failure

Subjects

English love sonnets | English love sonnets | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Philip Sidney | Philip Sidney | Edmund Spenser | Edmund Spenser | Mary Wroth | Mary Wroth | sound | sound | rhythm | rhythm | figuration | figuration | poetry | poetry | Petrarchan literary tradition | Petrarchan literary tradition | Francis Petrarch | Francis Petrarch | Sir Thomas Wyatt | Sir Thomas Wyatt | uses of love poetry | uses of love poetry | seduction | seduction | fame | fame | morals | morals | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | conduct manuals | conduct manuals | theories of gender and anatomy | theories of gender and anatomy | narrative poems | narrative poems | pornographic poems | pornographic poems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.412 Texts, Topics, and Times in German Literature (MIT) 21G.412 Texts, Topics, and Times in German Literature (MIT)

Description

In diesem Kurs erhalten Sie einen Überblick über einige wichtige literarische Texte, Tendenzen und Themen aus der deutschsprachigen Literatur- und Kulturszene. Wir werden literarische Texte, Gedichte, Theaterstücke und Essays untersuchen, sowie andere ästhetische Formen besprechen, wie Film und Architektur. Da alle Texte gleichzeitig in ihrem spezifischen kulturellen Kontext gelesen werden, tragen sie zu einem Verständnis von verschiedenen historischen Aspekten bei. Unter anderen werden folgende Themen und Fragestellungen besprochen: Technologie und deren Einfluss auf die Gesellschaft, Fragen der Ethik bei wissenschaftlicher Arbeit, Konstruktion von nationaler Geschichte und kollektivem Gedächtnis. In diesem Kurs erhalten Sie einen Überblick über einige wichtige literarische Texte, Tendenzen und Themen aus der deutschsprachigen Literatur- und Kulturszene. Wir werden literarische Texte, Gedichte, Theaterstücke und Essays untersuchen, sowie andere ästhetische Formen besprechen, wie Film und Architektur. Da alle Texte gleichzeitig in ihrem spezifischen kulturellen Kontext gelesen werden, tragen sie zu einem Verständnis von verschiedenen historischen Aspekten bei. Unter anderen werden folgende Themen und Fragestellungen besprochen: Technologie und deren Einfluss auf die Gesellschaft, Fragen der Ethik bei wissenschaftlicher Arbeit, Konstruktion von nationaler Geschichte und kollektivem Gedächtnis.

Subjects

modern German literature | modern German literature | lyric poetry | lyric poetry | drama | drama | film | film | poetry | poetry | radio plays | radio plays | architecture | architecture | translation and interpretation | translation and interpretation | essays | essays | cultural context | cultural context | scientific ethics | scientific ethics | technology | technology | construction of national history | construction of national history | the Holocaust | the Holocaust | 20th century Germany | 20th century Germany

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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