Searching for poets : 24 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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Portrait of writer, poet Kirby Congdon - Key West Portrait of writer, poet Kirby Congdon - Key West

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Subjects

portraits | portraits | florida | florida | writers | writers | keywest | keywest | poets | poets | authors | authors | kirbycongdon | kirbycongdon

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21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT) 21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT)

Description

"Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, "Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion,

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | literary art | literary art | language | language | aethetic | aethetic | meaning | meaning | poetic drama | poetic drama | hymns | hymns | lyrics | lyrics | history | history | rhetoric | rhetoric | song | song | drama | drama | comedy | comedy | verse | verse | form | form | rhyme | rhyme | prose | prose | musical | musical | ambiguity | ambiguity | symbolism | symbolism | world | world | irony | irony | style | style | stylistic | stylistic | poetic diction | poetic diction | simile | simile | connections | connections | cultures | cultures | genres | genres | elements of poetry | elements of poetry | lines | lines | stanzas | stanzas | English love sonnets | English love sonnets | sound | sound | figuration | figuration | literary tradition | literary tradition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT) 21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

This is a course focused on the literary genre of the essay, that wide-ranging, elastic, and currently very popular form that attracts not only nonfiction writers but also fiction writers, poets, scientists, physicians, and others to write in the form, and readers of every stripe to read it. Some say we are living in era in which the essay is enjoying a renaissance; certainly essays, both short and long, are at present easier to get published than are short stories or novels, and essays are featured regularly and prominently in the mainstream press (both magazines and newspapers) and on the New York Times bestseller books list. But the essay has a history, too, a long one, which goes back at least to the sixteenth-century French writer Montaigne, generally considered the progenitor of the This is a course focused on the literary genre of the essay, that wide-ranging, elastic, and currently very popular form that attracts not only nonfiction writers but also fiction writers, poets, scientists, physicians, and others to write in the form, and readers of every stripe to read it. Some say we are living in era in which the essay is enjoying a renaissance; certainly essays, both short and long, are at present easier to get published than are short stories or novels, and essays are featured regularly and prominently in the mainstream press (both magazines and newspapers) and on the New York Times bestseller books list. But the essay has a history, too, a long one, which goes back at least to the sixteenth-century French writer Montaigne, generally considered the progenitor of the

Subjects

Writing | Writing | reading | reading | essay | essay | iterary genre | iterary genre | nonfiction writers | nonfiction writers | fiction writers | fiction writers | poets | poets | scientists | scientists | physicians | physicians | Didion | Didion | Bacon | Bacon | White | White | E.B. | E.B. | Walker | Walker | Oates | Oates | Orwell | Orwell | Gould | Gould | Wolfe | Wolfe | Woolf | Woolf | Eiseley | Eiseley | White | E.B. | White | E.B.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction and Drama (MIT) 21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction and Drama (MIT)

Description

Introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works to be read include: Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Margin, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature to be read in translation. Conducted in English. Introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works to be read include: Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Margin, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature to be read in translation. Conducted in English.

Subjects

genre | genre | tradition | tradition | Chinese poetry | Chinese poetry | Chinese fiction | Chinese fiction | Chinese drama | Chinese drama | Journey to the West | Journey to the West | Outlaws of the Margin | Outlaws of the Margin | Dream of the Red Chamber | Dream of the Red Chamber | Tang dynasty poets | Tang dynasty poets

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT)

Description

William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well. William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well.

Subjects

W. B. Yeats | W. B. Yeats | William Butler Yeats | William Butler Yeats | Irish poetry | Irish poetry | poetry | poetry | female poets | female poets | Patrick Kavanagh | Patrick Kavanagh | Louis MacNeice | Louis MacNeice | John Hewitt | John Hewitt | Richard Murphy | Richard Murphy | John Montague | John Montague | Seamus Heaney | Seamus Heaney | Michael Hartnett | Michael Hartnett | Derek Mahon | Derek Mahon | Paul Durcan | Paul Durcan | Paul Muldoon | Paul Muldoon | Ciaran Carson | Ciaran Carson | Paula Meehan | Paula Meehan | Medbh McGuckian | Medbh McGuckian | Boland | Boland | Rita Ann Higgins | Rita Ann Higgins | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | round table discussion | round table discussion | poetry discussion | poetry discussion | literary analysis | literary analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: From the Sonneteers to the Metaphysicals (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: From the Sonneteers to the Metaphysicals (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to some of the most important practitioners of poetry in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, locating them in their historical and social contexts. We will be emphasizing love poetry or amatory verse, by combining close reading of selected poems with an investigation of the contexts of English verse. This course introduces students to some of the most important practitioners of poetry in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, locating them in their historical and social contexts. We will be emphasizing love poetry or amatory verse, by combining close reading of selected poems with an investigation of the contexts of English verse.

Subjects

sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England | sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England | love poetry or amatory verse | love poetry or amatory verse | English Renaissance | English Renaissance | sonnet | sonnet | Petrarch | Petrarch | Elizabethan England | Elizabethan England | metaphysical poets | metaphysical poets | Donne and Marvell | Donne and Marvell

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers. This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | Milton | Milton | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Yeats | Yeats | Eliot | Eliot | Larkin | Larkin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT)

Description

This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays. This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays.

Subjects

Extensive reading | Extensive reading | major poets | major poets | evolution of each poet's work | evolution of each poet's work | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | recognition of beauty | recognition of beauty | justice | justice | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | British literary authors | British literary authors | 19th century | 19th century | literature | literature | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | Wordsworth | Keats | Wordsworth | Keats | Mary Robinson | Mary Robinson | Mary and Percy Shelley | Mary and Percy Shelley | Thomas De Quincey | Thomas De Quincey | Dickens | Dickens | Walter Pater | Walter Pater | Wilde | Wilde

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.476 Romantic Poetry (MIT) 21L.476 Romantic Poetry (MIT)

Description

This course examines readings of the major British Romantic poets (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Scott, Shelley, and Keats) and important fiction writers (Mary Shelley and Walter Scott). Attention is also given to literary and historical contexts. This course examines readings of the major British Romantic poets (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Scott, Shelley, and Keats) and important fiction writers (Mary Shelley and Walter Scott). Attention is also given to literary and historical contexts.

Subjects

Close readings of the major British Romantic poets (Blake | Wordsworth | Coleridge | Byron | Scott | Shelley | and Keats) | Close readings of the major British Romantic poets (Blake | Wordsworth | Coleridge | Byron | Scott | Shelley | and Keats) | important fiction writers (Mary Shelley and Walter Scott) | important fiction writers (Mary Shelley and Walter Scott) | Attention given to literary and historical contexts | Attention given to literary and historical contexts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT) 21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject follows a course of readings in lyric poetry in the English language, tracing the main lines of descent through literary periods from the Renaissance to the modern period and concentrating mostly on English rather than American examples. This subject follows a course of readings in lyric poetry in the English language, tracing the main lines of descent through literary periods from the Renaissance to the modern period and concentrating mostly on English rather than American examples.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | Milton | Milton | Pope | Pope | Wordsworth | Wordsworth | Keats | Keats | Yeats | Yeats | Eliot | Eliot | Larkin | Larkin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT)

Description

"Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion,

Subjects

Literature | poetry | poets | English | Renaissance | modern | Shakespeare | sonnets | stanza-form | figurative language | metaphor | metonymy | meter | accent | duration | apostrophe | assonance | enjambment | chiasmus | hyperbole | litotes | Donne | metaphysical | literary art | language | aethetic | meaning | poetic drama | hymns | lyrics | history | rhetoric | song | drama | comedy | verse | form | rhyme | prose | musical | ambiguity | symbolism | world | irony | style | stylistic | poetic diction | simile | connections | cultures | genres | elements of poetry | lines | stanzas | English love sonnets | sound | figuration | literary tradition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT)

Description

William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well.

Subjects

W. B. Yeats | William Butler Yeats | Irish poetry | poetry | female poets | Patrick Kavanagh | Louis MacNeice | John Hewitt | Richard Murphy | John Montague | Seamus Heaney | Michael Hartnett | Derek Mahon | Paul Durcan | Paul Muldoon | Ciaran Carson | Paula Meehan | Medbh McGuckian | Boland | Rita Ann Higgins | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | round table discussion | poetry discussion | literary analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Rudyard Kipling Addressing American Soldiers During World War I

Description

Subjects

ohio | history | wwi | worldwari | worldwarone | soldiers | greatwar | firstworldwar | poets | authors | kipling | rudyardkipling | upperarlington | franklincounty | thegreatwar | josephrudyardkipling | uaarchives | httpwwwuaarchivesorg | norwestermagazine

License

No known copyright restrictions

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: From the Sonneteers to the Metaphysicals (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to some of the most important practitioners of poetry in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, locating them in their historical and social contexts. We will be emphasizing love poetry or amatory verse, by combining close reading of selected poems with an investigation of the contexts of English verse.

Subjects

sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England | love poetry or amatory verse | English Renaissance | sonnet | Petrarch | Elizabethan England | metaphysical poets | Donne and Marvell

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject is an introduction to poetry as a genre; most of our texts are originally written in English. We read poems from the Renaissance through the 17th and 18th centuries, Romanticism, and Modernism. Focus will be on analytic reading, on literary history, and on the development of the genre and its forms; in writing we attend to techniques of persuasion and of honest evidenced sequential argumentation. Poets to be read will include William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and some contemporary writers.

Subjects

Literature | poetry | poets | English | Renaissance | modern | Shakespeare | sonnets | stanza-form | figurative language | metaphor | metonymy | meter | accent | duration | apostrophe | assonance | enjambment | chiasmus | hyperbole | litotes | Donne | metaphysical | Milton | Pope | Wordsworth | Keats | Yeats | Eliot | Larkin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Attribution

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT)

Description

This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays.

Subjects

Extensive reading | major poets | evolution of each poet's work | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | recognition of beauty | justice | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | British literary authors | 19th century | literature | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | Wordsworth | Keats | Mary Robinson | Mary and Percy Shelley | Thomas De Quincey | Dickens | Walter Pater | Wilde

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Attribution

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21L.476 Romantic Poetry (MIT)

Description

This course examines readings of the major British Romantic poets (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Scott, Shelley, and Keats) and important fiction writers (Mary Shelley and Walter Scott). Attention is also given to literary and historical contexts.

Subjects

Close readings of the major British Romantic poets (Blake | Wordsworth | Coleridge | Byron | Scott | Shelley | and Keats) | important fiction writers (Mary Shelley and Walter Scott) | Attention given to literary and historical contexts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Major Poets (MIT)

Description

This subject follows a course of readings in lyric poetry in the English language, tracing the main lines of descent through literary periods from the Renaissance to the modern period and concentrating mostly on English rather than American examples.

Subjects

Literature | poetry | poets | English | Renaissance | modern | Shakespeare | sonnets | stanza-form | figurative language | metaphor | metonymy | meter | accent | duration | apostrophe | assonance | enjambment | chiasmus | hyperbole | litotes | Donne | metaphysical | Milton | Pope | Wordsworth | Keats | Yeats | Eliot | Larkin

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Writers reading: favourite books

Description

Authors:  Michiel Heyns, Finuala Dowling, Imraan Coovadia, Yewande Omotoso, Henrietta Rose-Innes What books do writers read for pleasure? This course will reveal which recent books five prominent South African writers are currently enjoying and why. Clicked 62 times. Last clicked 07/29/2014 - 22:50. Teaching & Learning Context:  For anyone interested in learning more about what prominent SA writers read for pleasure.

Subjects

Centre for Higher Education Development | Centre for Open Learning | Audio | Audio Lectures | English | Post-secondary | authors | Finuala Dowling | Henrietta Rose-Innes | Imraan Coovadia | literature | poetry | poets | SA writers | South African writers | Yewande Omotoso

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.5/za/

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Aime Cesaire and Derek Walcott

Description

In this audio podcast from the University of Oxford, Jason Allen offers a comparative discussion of two important Caribbean poets and playwrights, Aime Cesaire and Derek Walcott, to emphasize the impact of Caribbean literature upon the postcolonial world. By using biographical and historical detail to support his analysis of some of Cesaire and Walcott's key texts, Allen offers insight into what it means to be a Caribbean writer - looking back to a colonial past, and forward to a global future

Subjects

hybridity | postcolonial literature | greatwriters | playwrights | drama | theatre | poets | caribbean literature | aime cesaire | derek walcott | caribbean poetry | caribbean plays | black history month | bhm | black artists | black culture | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Poet from Bwlch Nant yr Haiarn

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wales | cymru | bards | poets | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | nationallibraryofwales | filmnegatives | agedpersons | genrephotographs | charlesgeoff19092002 | negyddffilm | vision:mountain=0854 | vision:outdoor=0965 | vision:sky=0663

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21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction and Drama (MIT)

Description

Introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works to be read include: Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Margin, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature to be read in translation. Conducted in English.

Subjects

genre | tradition | Chinese poetry | Chinese fiction | Chinese drama | Journey to the West | Outlaws of the Margin | Dream of the Red Chamber | Tang dynasty poets

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

This is a course focused on the literary genre of the essay, that wide-ranging, elastic, and currently very popular form that attracts not only nonfiction writers but also fiction writers, poets, scientists, physicians, and others to write in the form, and readers of every stripe to read it. Some say we are living in era in which the essay is enjoying a renaissance; certainly essays, both short and long, are at present easier to get published than are short stories or novels, and essays are featured regularly and prominently in the mainstream press (both magazines and newspapers) and on the New York Times bestseller books list. But the essay has a history, too, a long one, which goes back at least to the sixteenth-century French writer Montaigne, generally considered the progenitor of the

Subjects

Writing | reading | essay | iterary genre | nonfiction writers | fiction writers | poets | scientists | physicians | Didion | Bacon | White | E.B. | Walker | Oates | Orwell | Gould | Wolfe | Woolf | Eiseley | White | E.B.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

This is a course focused on the literary genre of the essay, that wide-ranging, elastic, and currently very popular form that attracts not only nonfiction writers but also fiction writers, poets, scientists, physicians, and others to write in the form, and readers of every stripe to read it. Some say we are living in era in which the essay is enjoying a renaissance; certainly essays, both short and long, are at present easier to get published than are short stories or novels, and essays are featured regularly and prominently in the mainstream press (both magazines and newspapers) and on the New York Times bestseller books list. But the essay has a history, too, a long one, which goes back at least to the sixteenth-century French writer Montaigne, generally considered the progenitor of the

Subjects

Writing | reading | essay | iterary genre | nonfiction writers | fiction writers | poets | scientists | physicians | Didion | Bacon | White | E.B. | Walker | Oates | Orwell | Gould | Wolfe | Woolf | Eiseley | White | E.B.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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