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HST.542J Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems (MIT) HST.542J Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates on the application of the principles of energy and mass flow to major human organ systems. It discusses mechanisms of regulation and homeostasis. It also discusses anatomical, physiological, and pathophysiological features of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. There is emphasis on those systems, features, and devices that are most illuminated by the methods of physical sciences. This course elaborates on the application of the principles of energy and mass flow to major human organ systems. It discusses mechanisms of regulation and homeostasis. It also discusses anatomical, physiological, and pathophysiological features of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. There is emphasis on those systems, features, and devices that are most illuminated by the methods of physical sciences.

Subjects

electrocardiogram | electrocardiogram | cardiovascular system | cardiovascular system | cardiovascular physiology | cardiovascular physiology | electrophysiology | electrophysiology | myocardial cells | myocardial cells | electrocardiography | electrocardiography | physiological fluid mechanics | physiological fluid mechanics | respiratory physiology | respiratory physiology | renal physiology | renal physiology | quantitative physiology | quantitative physiology | pulmonary mechanics | pulmonary mechanics | heart | heart | arrhythmia | arrhythmia | pulmonary modeling | pulmonary modeling | clinical electrocardiography | clinical electrocardiography | ECG | ECG | EKG | EKG | ischemia | ischemia | infarction | infarction | vector cardiogram | vector cardiogram | purkinje fibers | purkinje fibers | QRS waveform | QRS waveform | tachycardia | tachycardia | action potential | action potential | depolarization | depolarization | afterdepolarization | afterdepolarization | total lung capacity | total lung capacity | systolic | systolic | diastolic | diastolic | residual volume | residual volume | vital capacity | vital capacity | HST.542 | HST.542 | 2.792 | 2.792 | 20.371J20.371 | 20.371J20.371 | 6.022 | 6.022

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TALAT Lecture 5102: Reactivity of the Aluminium Surface in Aqueous Solutions

Description

This lecture provides better understanding of the electrochemistry of aluminium; it gives an introduction to the other lectures. Some knowledge in aluminium metallurgy, simple chemistry (thermodynamics and kinetics), electricity and general electrochemistry is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | eaa | talat | training in aluminium application technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | surface treatment | electrochemical principles | aqueous solutions | reactivity | equilibrium conditions | pourbaix diagram | anodic polarization | cathodic polarization | polarization curve | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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TALAT Lecture 5102: Reactivity of the Aluminium Surface in Aqueous Solutions

Description

This lecture provides better understanding of the electrochemistry of aluminium; it gives an introduction to the other lectures. Some knowledge in aluminium metallurgy, simple chemistry (thermodynamics and kinetics), electricity and general electrochemistry is assumed.

Subjects

aluminium | aluminum | european aluminium association | EAA | Training in Aluminium Application Technologies | training | metallurgy | technology | lecture | surface treatment | electrochemical principles | aqueous solutions | reactivity | equilibrium conditions | Pourbaix diagram | anodic polarization | cathodic polarization | polarization curve | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT) 6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgments The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen and Matthew Pegler for transcribing into LaTeX the homework problems, homework solutions, and Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This course examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgments The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen and Matthew Pegler for transcribing into LaTeX the homework problems, homework solutions, and

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | electromagnetic field | forces | forces | motion | motion | electric | electric | magnetic | magnetic | quasistatic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | dielectric | conduction | conduction | magnetization | magnetization | boundary value problems | boundary value problems | force densities | force densities | stress tensors | stress tensors | polarization | polarization | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equations of motion | equations of motion | energy conservation | energy conservation | synchronous | synchronous | induction | induction | commutator machines | commutator machines | sensors | sensors | transducers | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena | charge transport phenomena

License

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17.20 Introduction to American Politics (MIT) 17.20 Introduction to American Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides a substantive overview of U.S. politics and an introduction to the discipline of political science. It surveys the institutional foundations of U.S. politics as well as the activities of political elites, organizations, and ordinary citizens. It also explores the application of general political science concepts and analytic frameworks to specific episodes and phenomena in U.S. politics. This course provides a substantive overview of U.S. politics and an introduction to the discipline of political science. It surveys the institutional foundations of U.S. politics as well as the activities of political elites, organizations, and ordinary citizens. It also explores the application of general political science concepts and analytic frameworks to specific episodes and phenomena in U.S. politics.

Subjects

American politics | American politics | The Constitution | The Constitution | politicians | politicians | Congress | Congress | the Presidency | the Presidency | bureaucracy | bureaucracy | judiciary | judiciary | federalism | federalism | public opinion | public opinion | political parties | political parties | partisanship | partisanship | choice | choice | campaigns | campaigns | elections | elections | policy | policy | political geography | political geography | polarization | polarization | extremism | extremism | organized interests | organized interests | economic inequality | economic inequality | race | race | immigration | immigration | multiculturalism | multiculturalism

License

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | number states | coherent states | coherent states | and squeezed states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation. | and quantum teleportation.

License

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8.03 Physics III (MIT) 8.03 Physics III (MIT)

Description

Mechanical vibrations and waves, simple harmonic motion, superposition, forced vibrations and resonance, coupled oscillations and normal modes, vibrations of continuous systems, reflection and refraction, phase and group velocity. Optics, wave solutions to Maxwell's equations, polarization, Snell's law, interference, Huygens's principle, Fraunhofer diffraction, and gratings. Mechanical vibrations and waves, simple harmonic motion, superposition, forced vibrations and resonance, coupled oscillations and normal modes, vibrations of continuous systems, reflection and refraction, phase and group velocity. Optics, wave solutions to Maxwell's equations, polarization, Snell's law, interference, Huygens's principle, Fraunhofer diffraction, and gratings.

Subjects

Mechanical vibrations and waves | Mechanical vibrations and waves | simple harmonic motion | simple harmonic motion | superposition | superposition | forced vibrations and resonance | forced vibrations and resonance | coupled oscillations and normal modes | coupled oscillations and normal modes | vibrations of continuous systems | vibrations of continuous systems | reflection and refraction | reflection and refraction | phase and group velocity | phase and group velocity | wave solutions to Maxwell's equations | wave solutions to Maxwell's equations | polarization | polarization | Snell's Law | Snell's Law | interference | interference | Huygens's principle | Huygens's principle | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | gratings | gratings

License

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields | P-representation and classical fields | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | quantum teleportation | quantum teleportation

License

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6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT) 6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.161 explores modern optics through lectures, laboratory exercises, and projects. Topics covered include: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, coherent optical processors, holography, optical properties of materials, lasers, nonlinear optics, electro-optic and acousto-optic materials and devices, optical detectors, fiber optics, and optical communication. This course is worth 12 Engineering Design Points. 6.161 explores modern optics through lectures, laboratory exercises, and projects. Topics covered include: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, coherent optical processors, holography, optical properties of materials, lasers, nonlinear optics, electro-optic and acousto-optic materials and devices, optical detectors, fiber optics, and optical communication. This course is worth 12 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

modern optics lab | modern optics lab | modern optics | modern optics | laboratory | laboratory | polarization | polarization | light | light | reflection | reflection | refraction | refraction | coherence | coherence | interference | interference | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | imaging | imaging | transforming | transforming | lenses | lenses | spatial filtering | spatial filtering | coherent optical processors | coherent optical processors | holography | holography | optical properties of materials | optical properties of materials | lasers | lasers | nonlinear optics | nonlinear optics | electro-optic | electro-optic | acousto-optic | acousto-optic | optical detectors | optical detectors | fiber optics | fiber optics | optical communication | optical communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | number states | coherent states | coherent states | and squeezed states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation. | and quantum teleportation.

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6.630 Electromagnetic Theory (MIT) 6.630 Electromagnetic Theory (MIT)

Description

6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. Media player software, such as QuickTime® Player, RealOne™ Player, or Windows Media® Player, is required to run the .mpeg files found on this course site. The latest version 6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. Media player software, such as QuickTime® Player, RealOne™ Player, or Windows Media® Player, is required to run the .mpeg files found on this course site. The latest version

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | Maxwell | Maxwell | polarization | polarization | dipole antennas | dipole antennas | wireless communications | wireless communications | forces | forces | energy | energy | phase matching | phase matching | dielectric waveguides | dielectric waveguides | optical fibers | optical fibers | transmission line theory | transmission line theory | circuit | circuit | antennas | antennas | equivalent principle | equivalent principle | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | propagation | propagation | guidance | guidance | radiation | radiation | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves

License

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT) 6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. 6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | electromagnetic field | forces | forces | motion | motion | electric | electric | magnetic | magnetic | quasistatic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | dielectric | conduction | conduction | magnetization | magnetization | boundary value problems | boundary value problems | force densities | force densities | stress tensors | stress tensors | polarization | polarization | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equations of motion | equations of motion | energy conservation | energy conservation | synchronous | synchronous | induction | induction | commutator machines | commutator machines | sensors | sensors | transducers | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena | charge transport phenomena

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.630 Electromagnetics (MIT) 6.630 Electromagnetics (MIT)

Description

6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves. 6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | Maxwell | Maxwell | polarization | polarization | dipole antennas | dipole antennas | wireless communications | wireless communications | forces | forces | energy | energy | phase matching | phase matching | dielectric waveguides | dielectric waveguides | optical fibers | optical fibers | transmission line theory | transmission line theory | circuit | circuit | antennas | antennas | equivalent principle | equivalent principle | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | propagation | propagation | guidance | guidance | radiation | radiation | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves

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6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT) 6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.161 offers an introduction to laboratory optics, optical principles, and optical devices and systems. This course covers a wide range of topics, including: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, holography, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, two-lens coherent optical processor, optical properties of materials, lasers, electro-optic, acousto-optic and liquid-crystal light modulators, optical detectors, optical waveguides and fiber-optic communication systems. Students engage in extensive oral and written communication exercises. There are 12 engineering design points associated with this subject. 6.161 offers an introduction to laboratory optics, optical principles, and optical devices and systems. This course covers a wide range of topics, including: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, holography, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, two-lens coherent optical processor, optical properties of materials, lasers, electro-optic, acousto-optic and liquid-crystal light modulators, optical detectors, optical waveguides and fiber-optic communication systems. Students engage in extensive oral and written communication exercises. There are 12 engineering design points associated with this subject.

Subjects

modern optics lab | modern optics lab | modern optics | modern optics | laboratory | laboratory | polarization | polarization | light | light | reflection | reflection | refraction | refraction | coherence | coherence | interference | interference | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | imaging | imaging | transforming | transforming | lenses | lenses | spatial filtering | spatial filtering | coherent optical processors | coherent optical processors | holography | holography | optical properties of materials | optical properties of materials | lasers | lasers | nonlinear optics | nonlinear optics | electro-optic | electro-optic | acousto-optic | acousto-optic | optical detectors | optical detectors | fiber optics | fiber optics | optical communication | optical communication

License

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17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT) 17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT)

Description

This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed. This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed.

Subjects

social action | social action | rational choice | rational choice | riots | riots | rebellions | rebellions | revolutions | revolutions | rationality | rationality | j-curve | j-curve | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | peasant movement | peasant movement | Vietnam | Vietnam | politics | politics | insurgency | insurgency | civil war | civil war | ethnicity | ethnicity | race riot | race riot | urban riot | urban riot | Rodney King | Rodney King | relative deprivation | relative deprivation | Spilerman | Spilerman | racial disturbances | racial disturbances | protest | protest | nationalist violence | nationalist violence | USSR | USSR | Balkans | Balkans | ethnic polarization | ethnic polarization | Kosovo | Kosovo | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Mali | Mali

License

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6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT) 6.641 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces, and Motion (MIT)

Description

6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgement The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen for transcribing into LaTeX selected homework problems, homework solutions, and exams. 6.641 examines electric and magnetic quasistatic forms of Maxwell's equations applied to dielectric, conduction, and magnetization boundary value problems. Topics covered include: electromagnetic forces, force densities, and stress tensors, including magnetization and polarization; thermodynamics of electromagnetic fields, equations of motion, and energy conservation; applications to synchronous, induction, and commutator machines; sensors and transducers; microelectromechanical systems; propagation and stability of electromechanical waves; and charge transport phenomena. Acknowledgement The instructor would like to thank Thomas Larsen for transcribing into LaTeX selected homework problems, homework solutions, and exams.

Subjects

electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetic field | electromagnetic field | forces | forces | motion | motion | electric | electric | magnetic | magnetic | quasistatic | quasistatic | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | dielectric | dielectric | conduction | conduction | magnetization | magnetization | boundary value problems | boundary value problems | force densities | force densities | stress tensors | stress tensors | polarization | polarization | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | equations of motion | equations of motion | energy conservation | energy conservation | synchronous | synchronous | induction | induction | commutator machines | commutator machines | sensors | sensors | transducers | transducers | microelectromechanical systems | microelectromechanical systems | electromechanical waves | electromechanical waves | charge transport phenomena | charge transport phenomena

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optics | optics | optical science | optical science | geometrical optics | geometrical optics | ray-tracing | ray-tracing | aberrations | aberrations | lens design | lens design | apertures | apertures | stops | stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | interference | interference | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Fresnel | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product | optical design | optical design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

Introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Emphasis on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. Introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Emphasis on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

ray-tracing | ray-tracing | lens design | lens design | apertures and stops | apertures and stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | basic electrodynamics | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction | Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered include geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry; wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, and space-bandwidth product. Emphasis is on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. This course is an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered include geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry; wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, and space-bandwidth product. Emphasis is on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optical science | optical science | elementary engineering applications | elementary engineering applications | Geometrical optics | Geometrical optics | ray-tracing | ray-tracing | aberrations | aberrations | lens design; apertures | lens design; apertures | stops | stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | basic electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | interference | interference | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Fresnel | Faunhofer diffraction | Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product | optical design | optical design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries. This course examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries.

Subjects

democracy | democracy | economic development | economic development | politics | politics | Germany | Germany | Iraq | Iraq | Mexico | Mexico | United States | United States | Middle East | Middle East | Latin America | Latin America | Africa | Africa | South Asia | South Asia | East Asia | East Asia | Greece | Greece | Aristotle | Aristotle | foreign affairs | foreign affairs | Lee Kuan Yew | Lee Kuan Yew | democratic institution | democratic institution | social divisions | social divisions | Federalist Papers | Federalist Papers | Karl Marx | Karl Marx | Communist Party | Communist Party | leadership | leadership | polarization | polarization | gridlock | gridlock | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Weimar Republic | Weimar Republic | imposed sovereignty | imposed sovereignty | Austri | Austri | regime breakdown | regime breakdown | Brazil | Brazil | capitalism | capitalism | industrial policy | industrial policy | women's emancipation | women's emancipation | women's suffrage | women's suffrage | Athens | Athens | the Constitution | the Constitution | reform | reform | presidentialism | presidentialism | federalism | federalism | bicameralism | bicameralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optical science | optical science | elementary engineering applications | elementary engineering applications | Geometrical optics | Geometrical optics | ray-tracing | ray-tracing | aberrations | aberrations | lens design | lens design | apertures | apertures | stops | stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | basic electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | interference | interference | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Fresnel | Faunhofer diffraction | Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product | optical design | optical design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Electronic Components and Circuits Electronic Components and Circuits

Description

Operating principle, models and applications of basic semiconductors electronic components (diodes, bipolar transistors and field effect transistors), including the bias circuits. In addition, the concepts related to electronic analog amplification stages (small signal gain, input and output impedances and frequency response). Finally, the characteristics of operational amplifiers (OA) as analog integrated circuits and some of the most important AO applications. Operating principle, models and applications of basic semiconductors electronic components (diodes, bipolar transistors and field effect transistors), including the bias circuits. In addition, the concepts related to electronic analog amplification stages (small signal gain, input and output impedances and frequency response). Finally, the characteristics of operational amplifiers (OA) as analog integrated circuits and some of the most important AO applications.

Subjects

polarization | polarization | Single-stage amplification circuits | Single-stage amplification circuits | electronic circuits analysis | electronic circuits analysis | semiconductor devices | semiconductor devices | Frequency response of transistor amplifier | Frequency response of transistor amplifier | electronic circuits | electronic circuits | a Electrnica | a Electrnica | Multi-stage amplifiers | Multi-stage amplifiers | electronic components | electronic components | Electronic Amplification | Electronic Amplification | Operational Amplifier | Operational Amplifier | 2010 | 2010 | a de Sistemas Audiovisuales | a de Sistemas Audiovisuales

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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MAS.963 Special Topics: Computational Camera and Photography (MIT) MAS.963 Special Topics: Computational Camera and Photography (MIT)

Description

A computational camera attempts to digitally capture the essence of visual information by exploiting the synergistic combination of task-specific optics, illumination, sensors and processing. In this course we will study this emerging multi-disciplinary field at the intersection of signal processing, applied optics, computer graphics and vision, electronics, art, and online sharing through social networks. If novel cameras can be designed to sample light in radically new ways, then rich and useful forms of visual information may be recorded — beyond those present in traditional photographs. Furthermore, if computational process can be made aware of these novel imaging models, them the scene can be analyzed in higher dimensions and novel aesthetic renderings of the visual information A computational camera attempts to digitally capture the essence of visual information by exploiting the synergistic combination of task-specific optics, illumination, sensors and processing. In this course we will study this emerging multi-disciplinary field at the intersection of signal processing, applied optics, computer graphics and vision, electronics, art, and online sharing through social networks. If novel cameras can be designed to sample light in radically new ways, then rich and useful forms of visual information may be recorded — beyond those present in traditional photographs. Furthermore, if computational process can be made aware of these novel imaging models, them the scene can be analyzed in higher dimensions and novel aesthetic renderings of the visual information

Subjects

signal processing; applied optics; Computer graphics; computer vision; online photo; digital photography; digital imaging; visual art image processing | signal processing; applied optics; Computer graphics; computer vision; online photo; digital photography; digital imaging; visual art image processing | image sensor | image sensor | image reconstruction | image reconstruction | medical imaging | medical imaging | mblog | mblog | biomimetics | biomimetics | lens | lens | spectrum | spectrum | multi-spectral | multi-spectral | 3D imaging | 3D imaging | thermal imaging | thermal imaging | high-speed imaging | high-speed imaging | polarization | polarization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.542J Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates on the application of the principles of energy and mass flow to major human organ systems. It discusses mechanisms of regulation and homeostasis. It also discusses anatomical, physiological, and pathophysiological features of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. There is emphasis on those systems, features, and devices that are most illuminated by the methods of physical sciences.

Subjects

electrocardiogram | cardiovascular system | cardiovascular physiology | electrophysiology | myocardial cells | electrocardiography | physiological fluid mechanics | respiratory physiology | renal physiology | quantitative physiology | pulmonary mechanics | heart | arrhythmia | pulmonary modeling | clinical electrocardiography | ECG | EKG | ischemia | infarction | vector cardiogram | purkinje fibers | QRS waveform | tachycardia | action potential | depolarization | afterdepolarization | total lung capacity | systolic | diastolic | residual volume | vital capacity | HST.542 | 2.792 | 20.371J20.371 | 6.022

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optical science | elementary engineering applications | Geometrical optics | ray-tracing | aberrations | lens design | apertures | stops | radiometry | photometry | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | polarization | interference | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | resolution | space-bandwidth product | optical design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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