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One War at a Time: Britain, the War of 1812 and the Defeat of Napoleon

Description

Professor Andrew Lambert, Laughton Professor of Naval History, King's College London, gives a talk for the ELAC/CCW seminar series. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

europe | america | France | Britain | napoleonic war | ethics | law | war | napoleon | armed conflict | europe | america | France | Britain | napoleonic war | ethics | law | war | napoleon | armed conflict | 2012-05-23

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Dublin City, Co. Dublin General Post Office, O'Connell Street, Dublin City, Co. Dublin

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Subjects

eason | eason | easonson | easonson | easoncollection | easoncollection | easonphotographiccollection | easonphotographiccollection | glassnegative | glassnegative | 20thcentury | 20thcentury | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | gpo | gpo | generalpostoffice | generalpostoffice | metropoletheatrecinemaandrestaurants | metropoletheatrecinemaandrestaurants | easonsshop | easonsshop | tramlines | tramlines | wires | wires | gaslights | gaslights | oconnellstreet | oconnellstreet | trams | trams | tram | tram | dublin | dublin | advertising | advertising | metropole | metropole | nelsonpillar | nelsonpillar

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No known copyright restrictions

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Russian Tu-144LL SST Flying Laboratory Takeoff at Zhukovsky Air Development Center

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Subjects

airplane | aircraft | aviation | nasa | sst | airliners | aerospace | tupolev | nationalaeronauticsandspaceadministration | zhukovsky | kuznetsov | tu144 | ramenskoye | tsagi | tupolevtu144 | supersonictransport | ra77114 | cccp77114 | uubw | ???? | tu144d | tupolevtu144charger | koliesov | koliesovrd36 | koliesovrd3651 | rd36 | rd3651 | tu144ll | kuznetsovnk321 | nk321 | ??????????????????????????????????????????? | tsentralniyaerogidrodinamicheskiyinstitut | centralaerohydrodynamicinstitute | zhukovskyairdevelopmentcenter

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Control (MIT) Control (MIT)

Description

6.241 examines linear, discrete- and continuous-time, and multi-input-output systems in control and related areas. Least squares and matrix perturbation problems are considered. Topics covered include: state-space models, modes, stability, controllability, observability, transfer function matrices, poles and zeros, minimality, internal stability of interconnected systems, feedback compensators, state feedback, optimal regulation, observers, observer-based compensators, measures of control performance, and robustness issues using singular values of transfer functions. Nonlinear systems are also introduced. 6.241 examines linear, discrete- and continuous-time, and multi-input-output systems in control and related areas. Least squares and matrix perturbation problems are considered. Topics covered include: state-space models, modes, stability, controllability, observability, transfer function matrices, poles and zeros, minimality, internal stability of interconnected systems, feedback compensators, state feedback, optimal regulation, observers, observer-based compensators, measures of control performance, and robustness issues using singular values of transfer functions. Nonlinear systems are also introduced.

Subjects

control | control | linear | linear | discrete | discrete | continuous-time | continuous-time | multi-input-output | multi-input-output | least squares | least squares | matrix perturbation | matrix perturbation | state-space models | stability | controllability | observability | transfer function matrices | poles | state-space models | stability | controllability | observability | transfer function matrices | poles | zeros | zeros | minimality | minimality | feedback | feedback | compensators | compensators | state feedback | state feedback | optimal regulation | optimal regulation | observers | transfer functions | observers | transfer functions | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | linear systems | linear systems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.346 France 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT) 21H.346 France 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT)

Description

A century and a half ago, Alexis de Tocqueville argued that the Revolution of 1789 in France constituted the culmination of long-term administrative and social changes, rather than a rupture with the past. In this class, we will consider that Tocquevillian insight by examining four aspects of French experience from the reign of the Sun King, Louis XIV, to the rule of the Emperor Napoléon Bonaparte: Absolutism, Enlightenment, Revolution, and Empire. Through the study of primary and secondary sources, we will see how the material lives, mental worlds, and individual and communal identities of the French changed over this century and a half. A century and a half ago, Alexis de Tocqueville argued that the Revolution of 1789 in France constituted the culmination of long-term administrative and social changes, rather than a rupture with the past. In this class, we will consider that Tocquevillian insight by examining four aspects of French experience from the reign of the Sun King, Louis XIV, to the rule of the Emperor Napoléon Bonaparte: Absolutism, Enlightenment, Revolution, and Empire. Through the study of primary and secondary sources, we will see how the material lives, mental worlds, and individual and communal identities of the French changed over this century and a half.

Subjects

French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleon | Napoleon | constitutional monarchy | constitutional monarchy | France | France | de Tocqueville | de Tocqueville | administrative | administrative | social | social | changes | changes | Louis XIV | Louis XIV | absolutism | absolutism | enlightenment | enlightenment | revolution | revolution | empire | empire

License

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16.31 Feedback Control Systems (MIT) 16.31 Feedback Control Systems (MIT)

Description

The goal of this subject is to teach the fundamentals of control design and analysis using state-space methods. This includes both the practical and theoretical aspects of the topic. By the end of the course, students should be able to design controllers using state-space methods and evaluate whether these controllers are "robust," that is, if they are likely to work well in practice. The goal of this subject is to teach the fundamentals of control design and analysis using state-space methods. This includes both the practical and theoretical aspects of the topic. By the end of the course, students should be able to design controllers using state-space methods and evaluate whether these controllers are "robust," that is, if they are likely to work well in practice.

Subjects

feedback control | feedback control | feedback control system | feedback control system | state-space | state-space | controllability | controllability | observability | observability | transfer functions | transfer functions | canonical forms | canonical forms | controllers | controllers | pole-placement | pole-placement | optimal control | optimal control | Kalman filter | Kalman filter

License

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6.630 Electromagnetic Theory (MIT) 6.630 Electromagnetic Theory (MIT)

Description

6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. Media player software, such as QuickTime® Player, RealOne™ Player, or Windows Media® Player, is required to run the .mpeg files found on this course site. The latest version 6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. Media player software, such as QuickTime® Player, RealOne™ Player, or Windows Media® Player, is required to run the .mpeg files found on this course site. The latest version

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | Maxwell | Maxwell | polarization | polarization | dipole antennas | dipole antennas | wireless communications | wireless communications | forces | forces | energy | energy | phase matching | phase matching | dielectric waveguides | dielectric waveguides | optical fibers | optical fibers | transmission line theory | transmission line theory | circuit | circuit | antennas | antennas | equivalent principle | equivalent principle | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | propagation | propagation | guidance | guidance | radiation | radiation | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves

License

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21H.346 The French Revolution and Napoleonic France (MIT) 21H.346 The French Revolution and Napoleonic France (MIT)

Description

The French esteem the Revolution of 1789 to be the turning point in their national history; journalists, politicians, scholars, and others outside France have called this moment the birth of modern political culture. In this subject we will begin with a brief survey of French politics, culture and society in the century prior to the Revolution, emphasizing the reasons for the end of the Old Regime and the origins of the Revolution. Next, we will examine the turbulent decade of the 1790s, when the French experimented with a constitutional monarchy, a republic, a dictatorship by committee, and a parliamentary form of government, only to end in a military coup d'état staged by Napoléon Bonaparte and his supporters. In 1804, Napoléon crowned himself emperor thus ini The French esteem the Revolution of 1789 to be the turning point in their national history; journalists, politicians, scholars, and others outside France have called this moment the birth of modern political culture. In this subject we will begin with a brief survey of French politics, culture and society in the century prior to the Revolution, emphasizing the reasons for the end of the Old Regime and the origins of the Revolution. Next, we will examine the turbulent decade of the 1790s, when the French experimented with a constitutional monarchy, a republic, a dictatorship by committee, and a parliamentary form of government, only to end in a military coup d'état staged by Napoléon Bonaparte and his supporters. In 1804, Napoléon crowned himself emperor thus ini

Subjects

French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleon | Napoleon | constitutional monarchy | constitutional monarchy | Old Regime | Old Regime | republic | republic | dictatorship | dictatorship | committee | committee | parliament | parliament | First Empire | First Empire

License

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4.665 Contemporary Architecture and Critical Debate (MIT) 4.665 Contemporary Architecture and Critical Debate (MIT)

Description

This class, required of all Master of Architecture students, presents a critical review of works, theories, and polemics in architecture in the aftermath of World War II. The aim is to present a historical understanding of the period, and to develop a meaningful framework to assess contemporary issues in architecture. Special attention will be paid to historiographic questions of how architects construe the terms of their "present." This class, required of all Master of Architecture students, presents a critical review of works, theories, and polemics in architecture in the aftermath of World War II. The aim is to present a historical understanding of the period, and to develop a meaningful framework to assess contemporary issues in architecture. Special attention will be paid to historiographic questions of how architects construe the terms of their "present."

Subjects

architecture | architecture | theory | theory | practice | practice | globalization | globalization | historiography | historiography | phenomenology | phenomenology | nationalism | nationalism | color | color | drawing | drawing | ornament | ornament | structure | structure | construction | construction | material | material | inhabitation | inhabitation | gender | gender | class | class | race | race | design | design | modernism | modernism | classicism | classicism | philosophy | philosophy | works | works | polemics | polemics

License

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6.01SC Introduction to Electrical Engineering and Computer Science I (MIT) 6.01SC Introduction to Electrical Engineering and Computer Science I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course provides an integrated introduction to electrical engineering and computer science, taught using substantial laboratory experiments with mobile robots. Our primary goal is for you to learn to appreciate and use the fundamental design principles of modularity and abstraction in a variety of contexts from electrical engineering and computer science. Our second goal is to show you that making mathematical models of real systems can help in the design and analysis of those systems. Finally, we have the more typical goals of teaching exciting and important basic material from electrical engineering and computer science, including modern software engineering, linear systems analysis, electronic circuits, and decision-making. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course provides an integrated introduction to electrical engineering and computer science, taught using substantial laboratory experiments with mobile robots. Our primary goal is for you to learn to appreciate and use the fundamental design principles of modularity and abstraction in a variety of contexts from electrical engineering and computer science. Our second goal is to show you that making mathematical models of real systems can help in the design and analysis of those systems. Finally, we have the more typical goals of teaching exciting and important basic material from electrical engineering and computer science, including modern software engineering, linear systems analysis, electronic circuits, and decision-making.

Subjects

Python programming | Python programming | object-oriented programming | object-oriented programming | state machines | state machines | signals and systems | signals and systems | linear time-invariant | linear time-invariant | LTI | LTI | poles | poles | circuits | circuits | op-amps | op-amps | Thevenin | Thevenin | Norton | Norton | superposition | superposition | probability | probability | state estimation | state estimation | search algorithms | search algorithms

License

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6.832 Underactuated Robotics (MIT) 6.832 Underactuated Robotics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Robots today move far too conservatively, using control systems that attempt to maintain full control authority at all times. Humans and animals move much more aggressively by routinely executing motions which involve a loss of instantaneous control authority. Controlling nonlinear systems without complete control authority requires methods that can reason about and exploit the natural dynamics of our machines. This course discusses nonlinear dynamics and control of underactuated mechanical systems, with an emphasis on machine learning methods. Topics include nonlinear dynamics of passive robots (walkers, swimmers, flyers), motion planning, partial feedback linearization, energy-shaping control, analytical optimal control, reinforcement learning/a Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Robots today move far too conservatively, using control systems that attempt to maintain full control authority at all times. Humans and animals move much more aggressively by routinely executing motions which involve a loss of instantaneous control authority. Controlling nonlinear systems without complete control authority requires methods that can reason about and exploit the natural dynamics of our machines. This course discusses nonlinear dynamics and control of underactuated mechanical systems, with an emphasis on machine learning methods. Topics include nonlinear dynamics of passive robots (walkers, swimmers, flyers), motion planning, partial feedback linearization, energy-shaping control, analytical optimal control, reinforcement learning/a

Subjects

underactuated robotics | underactuated robotics | actuated systems | actuated systems | nonlinear dynamics | nonlinear dynamics | simple pendulum | simple pendulum | optimal control | optimal control | double integrator | double integrator | quadratic regulator | quadratic regulator | Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman sufficiency | Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman sufficiency | minimum time control | minimum time control | acrobot | acrobot | cart-pole | cart-pole | partial feedback linearization | partial feedback linearization | energy shaping | energy shaping | policy search | policy search | open-loop optimal control | open-loop optimal control | trajectory stabilization | trajectory stabilization | iterative linear quadratic regulator | iterative linear quadratic regulator | differential dynamic programming | differential dynamic programming | walking models | walking models | rimless wheel | rimless wheel | compass gait | compass gait | kneed compass gait | kneed compass gait | feedback control | feedback control | running models | running models | spring-loaded inverted pendulum | spring-loaded inverted pendulum | Raibert hoppers | Raibert hoppers | motion planning | motion planning | randomized motion planning | randomized motion planning | rapidly-exploring randomized trees | rapidly-exploring randomized trees | probabilistic road maps | probabilistic road maps | feedback motion planning | feedback motion planning | planning with funnels | planning with funnels | linear quadratic regulator | linear quadratic regulator | function approximation | function approximation | state distribution dynamics | state distribution dynamics | state estimation | state estimation | stochastic optimal control | stochastic optimal control | aircraft | aircraft | swimming | swimming | flapping flight | flapping flight | randomized policy gradient | randomized policy gradient | model-free value methods | model-free value methods | temporarl difference learning | temporarl difference learning | Q-learning | Q-learning | actor-critic methods | actor-critic methods

License

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2.161 Signal Processing: Continuous and Discrete (MIT) 2.161 Signal Processing: Continuous and Discrete (MIT)

Description

This course provides a solid theoretical foundation for the analysis and processing of experimental data, and real-time experimental control methods. Topics covered include spectral analysis, filter design, system identification, and simulation in continuous and discrete-time domains. The emphasis is on practical problems with laboratory exercises. This course provides a solid theoretical foundation for the analysis and processing of experimental data, and real-time experimental control methods. Topics covered include spectral analysis, filter design, system identification, and simulation in continuous and discrete-time domains. The emphasis is on practical problems with laboratory exercises.

Subjects

analysis and processing of experimental data; real-time experimental control methods; spectral analysis; filter design; system identification; simulation in continuous and discrete-time domains; MATLAB | analysis and processing of experimental data; real-time experimental control methods; spectral analysis; filter design; system identification; simulation in continuous and discrete-time domains; MATLAB | fast Fourier transform | fast Fourier transform | correlation function | correlation function | sampling | sampling | op-amps | op-amps | Chebyshev | Chebyshev | Laplace transform | Laplace transform | Butterworth | Butterworth | convolution | convolution | frequency response | frequency response | windowing | windowing | low-pass | low-pass | poles | poles | zeros | zeros

License

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2.004 Dynamics and Control II (MIT) 2.004 Dynamics and Control II (MIT)

Description

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Create lumped parameter models (expressed as ODEs) of simple dynamic systems in the electrical and mechanical energy domains Make quantitative estimates of model parameters from experimental measurements Obtain the time-domain response of linear systems to initial conditions and/or common forcing functions (specifically; impulse, step and ramp input) by both analytical and computational methods Obtain the frequency-domain response of linear systems to sinusoidal inputs Compensate the transient response of dynamic systems using feedback techniques Design, implement and test an active control system to achieve a desired performance measure Mastery of these topics will be assessed via homework, quizzes/exams, and lab assig Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Create lumped parameter models (expressed as ODEs) of simple dynamic systems in the electrical and mechanical energy domains Make quantitative estimates of model parameters from experimental measurements Obtain the time-domain response of linear systems to initial conditions and/or common forcing functions (specifically; impulse, step and ramp input) by both analytical and computational methods Obtain the frequency-domain response of linear systems to sinusoidal inputs Compensate the transient response of dynamic systems using feedback techniques Design, implement and test an active control system to achieve a desired performance measure Mastery of these topics will be assessed via homework, quizzes/exams, and lab assig

Subjects

Laplace transform | Laplace transform | transform function | transform function | electrical and mechanical systems | electrical and mechanical systems | pole-zero diagram | pole-zero diagram | linearization | linearization | block diagrams | block diagrams | feedback control systems | feedback control systems | stability | stability | root-locus plot | root-locus plot | compensation | compensation | Bode plot | Bode plot | state space representation | state space representation | minimum time | minimum time

License

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2.004 Systems, Modeling, and Control II (MIT) 2.004 Systems, Modeling, and Control II (MIT)

Description

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:Create lumped parameter models (expressed as ODEs) of simple dynamic systems in the electrical and mechanical energy domainsMake quantitative estimates of model parameters from experimental measurementsObtain the time-domain response of linear systems to initial conditions and/or common forcing functions (specifically; impulse, step and ramp input) by both analytical and computational methodsObtain the frequency-domain response of linear systems to sinusoidal inputsCompensate the transient response of dynamic systems using feedback techniquesDesign, implement and test an active control system to achieve a desired performance measureMastery of these topics will be assessed via homework, quizzes/exams, and lab assignments. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:Create lumped parameter models (expressed as ODEs) of simple dynamic systems in the electrical and mechanical energy domainsMake quantitative estimates of model parameters from experimental measurementsObtain the time-domain response of linear systems to initial conditions and/or common forcing functions (specifically; impulse, step and ramp input) by both analytical and computational methodsObtain the frequency-domain response of linear systems to sinusoidal inputsCompensate the transient response of dynamic systems using feedback techniquesDesign, implement and test an active control system to achieve a desired performance measureMastery of these topics will be assessed via homework, quizzes/exams, and lab assignments.

Subjects

Laplace transform | Laplace transform | transform function | transform function | electrical and mechanical systems | electrical and mechanical systems | pole-zero diagram | pole-zero diagram | linearization | linearization | block diagrams | block diagrams | feedback control systems | feedback control systems | stability | stability | root-locus plot | root-locus plot | compensation | compensation | Bode plot | Bode plot | state space representation | state space representation | minimum time | minimum time

License

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6.630 Electromagnetics (MIT) 6.630 Electromagnetics (MIT)

Description

6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves. 6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | Maxwell | Maxwell | polarization | polarization | dipole antennas | dipole antennas | wireless communications | wireless communications | forces | forces | energy | energy | phase matching | phase matching | dielectric waveguides | dielectric waveguides | optical fibers | optical fibers | transmission line theory | transmission line theory | circuit | circuit | antennas | antennas | equivalent principle | equivalent principle | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | propagation | propagation | guidance | guidance | radiation | radiation | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves

License

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8.952 Particle Physics of the Early Universe (MIT) 8.952 Particle Physics of the Early Universe (MIT)

Description

This course covers the basics of general relativity, standard big bang cosmology, thermodynamics of the early universe, cosmic background radiation, primordial nucleosynthesis, basics of the standard model of particle physics, electroweak and QCD phase transition, basics of group theory, grand unified theories, baryon asymmetry, monopoles, cosmic strings, domain walls, axions, inflationary universe, and structure formation. This course covers the basics of general relativity, standard big bang cosmology, thermodynamics of the early universe, cosmic background radiation, primordial nucleosynthesis, basics of the standard model of particle physics, electroweak and QCD phase transition, basics of group theory, grand unified theories, baryon asymmetry, monopoles, cosmic strings, domain walls, axions, inflationary universe, and structure formation.

Subjects

general relativity | general relativity | big bang | big bang | cosmology | cosmology | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | early universe | early universe | cosmic background radiation | cosmic background radiation | primordial nucleosynthesis | primordial nucleosynthesis | standard model | standard model | electroweak and QCD phase transition | electroweak and QCD phase transition | group theory | group theory | grand unified theories | grand unified theories | baryon asymmetry | baryon asymmetry | monopoles | monopoles | cosmic strings | cosmic strings | domain walls | domain walls | axions | axions | inflationary universe | inflationary universe | structure formation | structure formation

License

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18.337J Parallel Computing (MIT) 18.337J Parallel Computing (MIT)

Description

This is an advanced interdisciplinary introduction to applied parallel computing on modern supercomputers. It has a hands-on emphasis on understanding the realities and myths of what is possible on the world's fastest machines. We will make prominent use of the Julia Language, a free, open-source, high-performance dynamic programming language for technical computing. This is an advanced interdisciplinary introduction to applied parallel computing on modern supercomputers. It has a hands-on emphasis on understanding the realities and myths of what is possible on the world's fastest machines. We will make prominent use of the Julia Language, a free, open-source, high-performance dynamic programming language for technical computing.

Subjects

cloud computing | cloud computing | dense linear algebra | dense linear algebra | sparse linear algebra | sparse linear algebra | N-body problems | N-body problems | multigrid | multigrid | fast-multipole | fast-multipole | wavelets | wavelets | Fourier transforms | Fourier transforms | partitioning | partitioning | mesh generation | mesh generation | applications oriented architecture | applications oriented architecture | parallel programming paradigms | parallel programming paradigms | MPI | MPI | data parallel systems | data parallel systems | Star-P | Star-P | parallel Python | parallel Python | parallel Matlab | parallel Matlab | graphics processors | graphics processors | virtualization | virtualization | caches | caches | vector processors | vector processors | VHLLs | VHLLs | Very High Level Languages | Very High Level Languages | Julia programming language | Julia programming language | distributed parallel execution | distributed parallel execution

License

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21H.346 France, 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT) 21H.346 France, 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT)

Description

This course covers French politics, culture, and society from Louis XIV to Napoleon Bonaparte. Attention is given to the growth of the central state, the beginnings of a modern consumer society, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, including its origins, and the rise and fall of Napoleon. This course covers French politics, culture, and society from Louis XIV to Napoleon Bonaparte. Attention is given to the growth of the central state, the beginnings of a modern consumer society, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, including its origins, and the rise and fall of Napoleon.

Subjects

French Revolution | French Revolution | history | history | french history | french history | european history | european history | napolean boneparte | napolean boneparte | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | the rights of man | the rights of man | Molière | Molière | Voltaire | Voltaire

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.601 Islam, the Middle East, and the West (MIT) 21H.601 Islam, the Middle East, and the West (MIT)

Description

This course aims to provide students with a general overview of basic themes and issues in Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam to the present, with an emphasis on the encounters and exchanges between the "Middle East" (Southwest Asia and North Africa) and the "West" (Europe and the United States). This course aims to provide students with a general overview of basic themes and issues in Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam to the present, with an emphasis on the encounters and exchanges between the "Middle East" (Southwest Asia and North Africa) and the "West" (Europe and the United States).

Subjects

southwest asia | southwest asia | north africa | north africa | europe | europe | united states | united states | abbasid | abbasid | empire | empire | mongol | mongol | christianity | christianity | ottoman | ottoman | colonization | colonization | napoleon | napoleon | egypt | egypt | hegemony | hegemony | islam | islam | middle | middle | east | east | west | west

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction (MIT)

Description

Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors incl

Subjects

British Romanticism | British Romanticism | prose | prose | fiction | fiction | novel | novel | social/philosophical problem novels | social/philosophical problem novels | sentiment | sentiment | sensibility | sensibility | historical novel | historical novel | French Revolution | French Revolution | Napoleonic wars | Napoleonic wars | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | William Godwin | William Godwin | Maria Edgeworth | Maria Edgeworth | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | Walter Scott | Walter Scott

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.665 Contemporary Architecture and Critical Debate (MIT) 4.665 Contemporary Architecture and Critical Debate (MIT)

Description

This class, required of all Master of Architecture students, presents a critical review of works, theories, and polemics in architecture in the aftermath of World War II. The aim is to present a historical understanding of the period, and to develop a meaningful framework to assess contemporary issues in architecture. Special attention will be paid to historiographic questions of how architects construe the terms of their "present." This class, required of all Master of Architecture students, presents a critical review of works, theories, and polemics in architecture in the aftermath of World War II. The aim is to present a historical understanding of the period, and to develop a meaningful framework to assess contemporary issues in architecture. Special attention will be paid to historiographic questions of how architects construe the terms of their "present."

Subjects

architecture | architecture | theory | theory | practice | practice | globalization | globalization | historiography | historiography | phenomenology | phenomenology | nationalism | nationalism | color | color | drawing | drawing | ornament | ornament | structure | structure | construction | construction | material | material | inhabitation | inhabitation | gender | gender | class | class | race | race | design | design | modernism | modernism | classicism | classicism | philosophy | philosophy | works | works | polemics | polemics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Radiación y Propagación Radiación y Propagación

Description

Se pretende dar una visión básica y general del fenómeno de radiación electromagnética, definiendo por una parte los parámetros básicos que se utilizan para especificar dicha radiación y presentando por otra los tipos de antenas más comúnmente utilizados. Se introducen también los modelos físicos de propagación de las ondas electromagnéticas en los distintos entornos en que tiene lugar la comunicación por ondas de radio. Se pretende dar una visión básica y general del fenómeno de radiación electromagnética, definiendo por una parte los parámetros básicos que se utilizan para especificar dicha radiación y presentando por otra los tipos de antenas más comúnmente utilizados. Se introducen también los modelos físicos de propagación de las ondas electromagnéticas en los distintos entornos en que tiene lugar la comunicación por ondas de radio.

Subjects

Polarization | Polarization | Directivity | Directivity | Antenna | Antenna | Friis Transmission Formula | Friis Transmission Formula | Arrays | Arrays | Noise figure | Noise figure | Wave propagation | Wave propagation | Horn antennas | Horn antennas | Aperture antennas | Aperture antennas | Dipoles | Dipoles | Radiated fields | Radiated fields | Linear antennas | Linear antennas | Radiation pattern | Radiation pattern | Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones | Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones | Gain | Gain

License

Copyright 2009, by the Contributing Authors http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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Houston Street from Soledad, Looking East

Description

Subjects

people | southwest | buildings | children | texas | pedestrians | storefronts | uswest | utilitypoles | carriagescoaches | commercialstreets | telegraphtelephonepoles

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Launch party of the cargo ship 'Eastern Rover'

Description

Launch party of the cargo ship ?Eastern Rover? at the North Sands shipyard of J.L. Thompson & Sons, Sunderland, 28 July 1961 (TWAM ref. DS.JLT4/PH/1/706/1/4). The image also shows the shell plates of her sister ship ?Eastern Ranger? in the background. For a remarkable view of 'Eastern Rover' taken on the same day through the shell plates of ?Eastern Ranger? see www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/9237704935/in/set-72157649.... This set celebrates the achievements of the famous Sunderland shipbuilding firm Joseph L. Thompson & Sons. The company?s origins date back to 1846 when the firm was known as Robert Thompson & Sons. Robert Thompson senior died in 1860, leaving his second son Joseph Lowes Thompson in control. In 1870 the shipyard completed its last wooden vessel and was then adapted for iron shipbuilding. By 1880 the firm had expanded its operations over much of North Sands and in 1884 completed the construction of Manor Quay, which served as fitting out and repair facilities. For many years in the late nineteenth century the yard was the most productive in Sunderland and in 1894 had the fourth largest output of any shipyard in the world. The Depression affected the firm severely in the early 1930s and no vessels were launched from 1931 to 1934. However, during those years the company developed a hull design giving greater efficiency and economy in service. During the Second World War the prototype developed by Joseph L. Thompson & Sons proved so popular that it was used by the US Government as the basis of over 2,700 Liberty ships built at American shipyards between 1942 and 1945. After the War the North Sands shipyard went on to build many fine cargo ships, oil tankers and bulk carriers. Sadly the shipyard closed in 1979, although it briefly reopened in 1986 to construct the crane barge ITM Challenger. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

sunderland | shipbuilding | jlthompsonsonsltd | northsandssunderland | shiplaunch | shipyardworkers | riverwear | maritimeheritage | blackandwhitephotograph | launchparty | gathering | platform | rail | cargoship | vessel | ?easternrover? | northsandsshipyard | 28july1961 | shellplates | sistership | easternranger | josephlthompsonsons | 1846 | robertthompsonsons | reception | northsands | industry | river | flagpole | flag | pole | flags | fence | timber | debris | wood | metal | steel | cylinder | pipe | flowers | women | men | hat | dress | coat | tie | shoes | rubbish | button | blouse | standing | observing | structure | frame | rope | britain | ladder | glasses | moustache | beard | pattern | stripe | hairpin | handbag | strap | pocket | crease | building | doorway | wall | window | glass

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Looking down Grey Street, Newcastle, 1958

Description

View along Grey Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, looking down toward the Theatre Royal, April 1958 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/4/976/8). Tyne & Wear Archives presents a series of images taken by the Newcastle-based photographers Turners Ltd. The firm had an excellent reputation and was regularly commissioned by local businesses to take photographs of their products and their premises. Turners also sometimes took aerial and street views on their own account and many of those images have survived, giving us a fascinating glimpse of life in the North East of England in the second half of the Twentieth Century. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

newcastleupontyne | 1950s | colourphotography | greystreet | theatreroyal | cars | lloydsbank | social | abstract | pavement | road | buildings | wall | woof | roof | window | glass | streetlamp | pedestrian | april1958 | turnersltd | photographer | commission | business | premises | products | streetview | glimpse | northeastofengland | twentiethcentury | door | wheel | metal | steel | stone | timber | signage | number | registrationplate | pole | chimney | brick | telegraphpole | wire | pillar | interesting | industry | briefcase | coat | hat | trousers | shoes | shadow | sky | light | sign | letter | debris

License

No known copyright restrictions

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