Searching for policymaking : 21 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1

Beyond fat tax: What is the role and potential of food taxes?

Description

Hannah Graff, National Heart Forum, gives a talk for the UBVO Seminar Series on 22nd November 2012. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

obesity | food taxes | policymaking | obesity | food taxes | policymaking | 2012-11-22

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129079/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.800 Doctoral Research Seminar: Knowledge in the Public Arena (MIT) 11.800 Doctoral Research Seminar: Knowledge in the Public Arena (MIT)

Description

This is a course about how research knowledge and other types of knowledge come to be actionable and influential in the world — or not. The course explores ways to make research knowledge more accessible, credible, and useful in the realm of public policy and practice, a project in which the course faculty collectively bring decades of professional experience, in both academic and non-academic roles. The course addresses the politics of the policymaking process, the power of framing and agenda-setting, fads and paradigms in the design professions and society in general, how knowledge diffuses along knowledge and influence networks, and how varied types of knowledge (rational, craft, other) and deliberation shape decision-making and action. The course engages a number of guests to pre This is a course about how research knowledge and other types of knowledge come to be actionable and influential in the world — or not. The course explores ways to make research knowledge more accessible, credible, and useful in the realm of public policy and practice, a project in which the course faculty collectively bring decades of professional experience, in both academic and non-academic roles. The course addresses the politics of the policymaking process, the power of framing and agenda-setting, fads and paradigms in the design professions and society in general, how knowledge diffuses along knowledge and influence networks, and how varied types of knowledge (rational, craft, other) and deliberation shape decision-making and action. The course engages a number of guests to pre

Subjects

research knowledge | research knowledge | public policy and practice | public policy and practice | policymaking | policymaking | framing | framing | agenda-setting | agenda-setting | knowledge diffusion | knowledge diffusion | knowledge and influence networks | knowledge and influence networks | deliberation | deliberation | decision-making | decision-making | action | action | public values | public values | political interests | political interests | ethical obligations | ethical obligations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.002J Fundamentals of Public Policy (MIT) 11.002J Fundamentals of Public Policy (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making. Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we need public policies? What determines the content and nature of public policies? Who decides public polic Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making. Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we need public policies? What determines the content and nature of public policies? Who decides public polic

Subjects

policymaking | policymaking | problem-solving process | problem-solving process | political process | political process | administrative agencies | administrative agencies | legislators | legislators | the courts | the courts | the mass public | the mass public | interest groups | interest groups | media | media | policy development | policy development | empirical models | empirical models | legislative | legislative | judicial | judicial | executive | executive | stakeholders | stakeholders | public decision making | public decision making | 11.002 | 11.002 | 17.30 | 17.30

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.002J Fundamentals of Public Policy (MIT) 11.002J Fundamentals of Public Policy (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making. Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we need public policies? What determines the content and nature of public policies? Who decides public polic Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making. Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we need public policies? What determines the content and nature of public policies? Who decides public polic

Subjects

policymaking | policymaking | problem-solving process | problem-solving process | political process | political process | administrative agencies | administrative agencies | legislators | legislators | the courts | the courts | the mass public | the mass public | interest groups | interest groups | media | media | policy development | policy development | empirical models | empirical models | legislative | legislative | judicial | judicial | executive | executive | stakeholders | stakeholders | public decision making | public decision making | 11.002 | 11.002 | 17.30 | 17.30

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.007 Resolving Public Disputes (MIT) 11.007 Resolving Public Disputes (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to real-world dynamics of public policy controversies. Topics to be considered include national, state, and local policy disputes, such as smoking, hazardous waste, abortion, gun control, and education. Using a case study approach, students study whether and how those disputes get resolved. Students conduct debates and simulations in addition to writing a series of short essays. This course is an introduction to real-world dynamics of public policy controversies. Topics to be considered include national, state, and local policy disputes, such as smoking, hazardous waste, abortion, gun control, and education. Using a case study approach, students study whether and how those disputes get resolved. Students conduct debates and simulations in addition to writing a series of short essays.

Subjects

public policy | public policy | policymaking | policymaking | law | law | legislature | legislature | social problems | social problems | power and wealth | power and wealth | problem solving | problem solving | direct democracy | direct democracy | consensus building | consensus building | regulatory negotiation | regulatory negotiation | politics | politics | political writing | political writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons

Subjects

why cities become torn | why cities become torn | ethnic | ethnic | religious | religious | racial | racial | nationalist | nationalist | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | violence | violence | inequality | inequality | social injustice | social injustice | solutions | solutions | social and political theories of the city and the nation | social and political theories of the city and the nation | territorial levels of determination | territorial levels of determination | regional or transnational | regional or transnational | policymaking | policymaking | democratic participation | democratic participation | citizenship | citizenship | spatial | spatial | infrastructural | infrastructural | technological interventions | technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | democracy | democracy | democratic | democratic | territory | territory | territorial | territorial | participation | participation | policy | policy | theoretical | theoretical | practical | practical | identity | identity | conflict | conflict | social | social | political | political | theories | theories | regional | regional | transnational | transnational | levels of determination | levels of determination | institutional | institutional | technological | technological | interventions | interventions | city | city | difference | difference | diversity | diversity | equality | equality | class | class | cities | cities | nations | nations | legal | legal | jurisdiction | jurisdiction | peace | peace | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.125 The Politics of Global Financial Relations (MIT) 17.125 The Politics of Global Financial Relations (MIT)

Description

This course explores effects of globalization of finance on international relations and domestic politics. Topics include international institutions and global governance; the multi-nationalization of production; effects of international capital markets on domestic politics; global finance and the developing world; and financial crises. Discussion of the interplay between politics and economics and the future of the nation-state. This course explores effects of globalization of finance on international relations and domestic politics. Topics include international institutions and global governance; the multi-nationalization of production; effects of international capital markets on domestic politics; global finance and the developing world; and financial crises. Discussion of the interplay between politics and economics and the future of the nation-state.

Subjects

multinational corporation | multinational corporation | bond market | bond market | welfare state | welfare state | foreign exchange market | foreign exchange market | exchange rate | exchange rate | IMF | IMF | global economy | global economy | globalization | globalization | finanical crime | finanical crime | money laundering | money laundering | international integration of capital markets | international integration of capital markets | national policymaking | national policymaking | foreign direct investment | foreign direct investment | international institutions | international institutions | global governance | global governance | global finance | global finance | developing world | developing world | financial crises | financial crises | domestic politics | domestic politics | currency crises | currency crises | Paul Krugman | Paul Krugman | J. Lawrence Broz | J. Lawrence Broz | Jeffry Frieden | Jeffry Frieden | global capitalism | global capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT) 17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT)

Description

This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor. This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.

Subjects

social science | social science | institutions | institutions | ideology | ideology | policymaking | policymaking | state-building | state-building | democracy | democracy | regime change | regime change | conflict | conflict | war | war | political process | political process | nationalism | nationalism | terrorism | terrorism | social movment | social movment | modernization | modernization | secularization | secularization | church-state | church-state

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.317 U.S. Social Policy (MIT) 17.317 U.S. Social Policy (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the historical development and contemporary politics of social policy in the United States. We will discuss the kinds of risks individuals face over a lifetime and why some are ameliorated by social policy while others are not (and how the U.S. is similar or different from other countries in this regard). We will examine the policymaking process in the U.S., why some alternatives are implemented and others abandoned, why some interests are privileged over others, and how the designs of policies can feed back and shape politics in a given policy area. Along the way we will examine interactions among political institutions, policy elites, the media, and the mass public. This subject examines the historical development and contemporary politics of social policy in the United States. We will discuss the kinds of risks individuals face over a lifetime and why some are ameliorated by social policy while others are not (and how the U.S. is similar or different from other countries in this regard). We will examine the policymaking process in the U.S., why some alternatives are implemented and others abandoned, why some interests are privileged over others, and how the designs of policies can feed back and shape politics in a given policy area. Along the way we will examine interactions among political institutions, policy elites, the media, and the mass public.

Subjects

United States social policy | United States social policy | U.S. policymaking process | U.S. policymaking process | political institutions | political institutions | policy elites | policy elites | media | media | mass public | mass public | American exceptionalism | American exceptionalism | Congress | Congress | U.S. courts | U.S. courts | representative government and participation | representative government and participation | policy in practice | policy in practice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

12.103 Strange Bedfellows: Science and Environmental Policy (MIT) 12.103 Strange Bedfellows: Science and Environmental Policy (MIT)

Description

12.103 explores the role of scientific knowledge, discovery, method, and argument in environmental policymaking from both idealistic and realistic perspectives. The course will use case studies of science-intensive environmental controversies to study how science was used and abused in the policymaking process. Case studies include: global warming, biodiversity loss, and nuclear waste disposal siting. Subject includes intensive practice in the writing and presentation of "position statements" on environmental science issues. 12.103 explores the role of scientific knowledge, discovery, method, and argument in environmental policymaking from both idealistic and realistic perspectives. The course will use case studies of science-intensive environmental controversies to study how science was used and abused in the policymaking process. Case studies include: global warming, biodiversity loss, and nuclear waste disposal siting. Subject includes intensive practice in the writing and presentation of "position statements" on environmental science issues.

Subjects

environmental policy | environmental policy | policymaking | policymaking | environmental controversy | environmental controversy | global warming | global warming | biodiversity loss | biodiversity loss | nuclear waste disposal | nuclear waste disposal | science writing | science writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-transportation.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.317 U.S. Social Policy (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the historical development and contemporary politics of social policy in the United States. We will discuss the kinds of risks individuals face over a lifetime and why some are ameliorated by social policy while others are not (and how the U.S. is similar or different from other countries in this regard). We will examine the policymaking process in the U.S., why some alternatives are implemented and others abandoned, why some interests are privileged over others, and how the designs of policies can feed back and shape politics in a given policy area. Along the way we will examine interactions among political institutions, policy elites, the media, and the mass public.

Subjects

United States social policy | U.S. policymaking process | political institutions | policy elites | media | mass public | American exceptionalism | Congress | U.S. courts | representative government and participation | policy in practice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.002J Fundamentals of Public Policy (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making. Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we need public policies? What determines the content and nature of public policies? Who decides public polic

Subjects

policymaking | problem-solving process | political process | administrative agencies | legislators | the courts | the mass public | interest groups | media | policy development | empirical models | legislative | judicial | executive | stakeholders | public decision making | 11.002 | 17.30

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allportuguesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.002J Fundamentals of Public Policy (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making. Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we need public policies? What determines the content and nature of public policies? Who decides public polic

Subjects

policymaking | problem-solving process | political process | administrative agencies | legislators | the courts | the mass public | interest groups | media | policy development | empirical models | legislative | judicial | executive | stakeholders | public decision making | 11.002 | 17.30

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons

Subjects

why cities become torn | ethnic | religious | racial | nationalist | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | violence | inequality | social injustice | solutions | social and political theories of the city and the nation | territorial levels of determination | regional or transnational | policymaking | democratic participation | citizenship | spatial | infrastructural | technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | democracy | democratic | territory | territorial | participation | policy | theoretical | practical | identity | conflict | social | political | theories | regional | transnational | levels of determination | institutional | technological | interventions | city | difference | diversity | equality | class | cities | nations | legal | jurisdiction | peace | cosmopolitan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

12.103 Strange Bedfellows: Science and Environmental Policy (MIT)

Description

12.103 explores the role of scientific knowledge, discovery, method, and argument in environmental policymaking from both idealistic and realistic perspectives. The course will use case studies of science-intensive environmental controversies to study how science was used and abused in the policymaking process. Case studies include: global warming, biodiversity loss, and nuclear waste disposal siting. Subject includes intensive practice in the writing and presentation of "position statements" on environmental science issues.

Subjects

environmental policy | policymaking | environmental controversy | global warming | biodiversity loss | nuclear waste disposal | science writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.800 Doctoral Research Seminar: Knowledge in the Public Arena (MIT)

Description

This is a course about how research knowledge and other types of knowledge come to be actionable and influential in the world — or not. The course explores ways to make research knowledge more accessible, credible, and useful in the realm of public policy and practice, a project in which the course faculty collectively bring decades of professional experience, in both academic and non-academic roles. The course addresses the politics of the policymaking process, the power of framing and agenda-setting, fads and paradigms in the design professions and society in general, how knowledge diffuses along knowledge and influence networks, and how varied types of knowledge (rational, craft, other) and deliberation shape decision-making and action. The course engages a number of guests to pre

Subjects

research knowledge | public policy and practice | policymaking | framing | agenda-setting | knowledge diffusion | knowledge and influence networks | deliberation | decision-making | action | public values | political interests | ethical obligations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.125 The Politics of Global Financial Relations (MIT)

Description

This course explores effects of globalization of finance on international relations and domestic politics. Topics include international institutions and global governance; the multi-nationalization of production; effects of international capital markets on domestic politics; global finance and the developing world; and financial crises. Discussion of the interplay between politics and economics and the future of the nation-state.

Subjects

multinational corporation | bond market | welfare state | foreign exchange market | exchange rate | IMF | global economy | globalization | finanical crime | money laundering | international integration of capital markets | national policymaking | foreign direct investment | international institutions | global governance | global finance | developing world | financial crises | domestic politics | currency crises | Paul Krugman | J. Lawrence Broz | Jeffry Frieden | global capitalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.007 Resolving Public Disputes (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to real-world dynamics of public policy controversies. Topics to be considered include national, state, and local policy disputes, such as smoking, hazardous waste, abortion, gun control, and education. Using a case study approach, students study whether and how those disputes get resolved. Students conduct debates and simulations in addition to writing a series of short essays.

Subjects

public policy | policymaking | law | legislature | social problems | power and wealth | problem solving | direct democracy | consensus building | regulatory negotiation | politics | political writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.002J Fundamentals of Public Policy (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making. Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we need public policies? What determines the content and nature of public policies? Who decides public polic

Subjects

policymaking | problem-solving process | political process | administrative agencies | legislators | the courts | the mass public | interest groups | media | policy development | empirical models | legislative | judicial | executive | stakeholders | public decision making | 11.002 | 17.30

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.002J Fundamentals of Public Policy (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Public Policy is an introductory course that explores policy-making as both a problem-solving process and a political process. We look at policy-making from the perspective of different focal actors and institutions, including: administrative agencies, legislators, the courts, the mass public, interest groups, and the media. We examine the interplay between policy development and institutions, and review normative and empirical models of policy-making. Exploring these issues will require us to address questions like: How and why does something come to be seen as a "public problem" requiring a governmental response, while others fail to get attention? Why do we need public policies? What determines the content and nature of public policies? Who decides public polic

Subjects

policymaking | problem-solving process | political process | administrative agencies | legislators | the courts | the mass public | interest groups | media | policy development | empirical models | legislative | judicial | executive | stakeholders | public decision making | 11.002 | 17.30

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allspanishcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT)

Description

This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.

Subjects

social science | institutions | ideology | policymaking | state-building | democracy | regime change | conflict | war | political process | nationalism | terrorism | social movment | modernization | secularization | church-state

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata