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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT) 17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas. This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas.

Subjects

finite element methods | finite element methods | solids | solids | structures | structures | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | heat transfer | heat transfer | equilibrium equations | equilibrium equations | direct integration | direct integration | mode superposition | mode superposition | eigensolution techniques | eigensolution techniques | frequencies | frequencies | mode shapes | mode shapes | statics | statics | dynamics | dynamics | nonlinear systems | nonlinear systems | wave propagation | wave propagation | Japan | Japan | politics | politics | policy | policy | contemporary Japan | contemporary Japan | electoral politics | electoral politics | interest group politics | interest group politics | party politics | party politics | bureaucratic politics | bureaucratic politics | social policy | social policy | foreign policy | foreign policy | defense policy | defense policy | energy policy | energy policy | science and technology policy | science and technology policy | industrial policy | industrial policy | trade policy | trade policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Fictionalised politics: how politics and politicians are represented in the US and the UK Fictionalised politics: how politics and politicians are represented in the US and the UK

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module assesses changing attitudes to representative politics in the US and UK, specifically political parties and those who lead them, through their representation in films, plays and novels since the C19th. How formal – party - politics is represented in films, novels, short stories, plays and television (note: in this module these five forms are covered by the term 'fiction') is an exciting and growing area of research. This is especially so in the US, but also (slowly but surely) in the UK. While the study of narrowly defined 'political' novels has a long lineage, it is only during the last decade or so that an interest in fictions expressed on the stage This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module assesses changing attitudes to representative politics in the US and UK, specifically political parties and those who lead them, through their representation in films, plays and novels since the C19th. How formal – party - politics is represented in films, novels, short stories, plays and television (note: in this module these five forms are covered by the term 'fiction') is an exciting and growing area of research. This is especially so in the US, but also (slowly but surely) in the UK. While the study of narrowly defined 'political' novels has a long lineage, it is only during the last decade or so that an interest in fictions expressed on the stage

Subjects

UNow | UNow | M13092 | M13092 | ukoer | ukoer | changing attitudes to representative politics in the US and UK | changing attitudes to representative politics in the US and UK | political parties and those who lead them | political parties and those who lead them | films | plays and novels since the C19th | films | plays and novels since the C19th | political novels | political novels | fictionalised politics | fictionalised politics | formal party politics | formal party politics | US and UK politics | US and UK politics | how politics is represented in the arts | how politics is represented in the arts

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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11.302J Urban Design Politics (MIT) 11.302J Urban Design Politics (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar about the ways that urban design contributes to the distribution of political power and resources in cities. "Design," in this view, is not some value-neutral aesthetic applied to efforts at urban development but is, instead, an integral part of the motives driving that development. The class investigates the nature of the relations between built form and political purposes through close examination of a wide variety of situations where public and private sector design commissions and planning processes have been clearly motivated by political pressures, as well as situations where the political assumptions have remained more tacit. We will explore cases from both developed and developing countries. This is a seminar about the ways that urban design contributes to the distribution of political power and resources in cities. "Design," in this view, is not some value-neutral aesthetic applied to efforts at urban development but is, instead, an integral part of the motives driving that development. The class investigates the nature of the relations between built form and political purposes through close examination of a wide variety of situations where public and private sector design commissions and planning processes have been clearly motivated by political pressures, as well as situations where the political assumptions have remained more tacit. We will explore cases from both developed and developing countries.

Subjects

urban design | urban design | urban politics | urban politics | design politics | design politics | political extremes | political extremes | urban resilience | urban resilience | public housing | public housing | architecture | architecture | political values | political values | aesthetics | aesthetics | gender politics | gender politics | power | power | capitol design | capitol design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.302J Urban Design Politics (MIT) 11.302J Urban Design Politics (MIT)

Description

This is a seminar about the ways that urban design contributes to the distribution of political power and resources in cities. "Design," in this view, is not some value-neutral aesthetic applied to efforts at urban development but is, instead, an integral part of the motives driving that development. The class investigates the nature of the relations between built form and political purposes through close examination of a wide variety of situations where public and private sector design commissions and planning processes have been clearly motivated by political pressures, as well as situations where the political assumptions have remained more tacit. We will explore cases from both developed and developing countries. This is a seminar about the ways that urban design contributes to the distribution of political power and resources in cities. "Design," in this view, is not some value-neutral aesthetic applied to efforts at urban development but is, instead, an integral part of the motives driving that development. The class investigates the nature of the relations between built form and political purposes through close examination of a wide variety of situations where public and private sector design commissions and planning processes have been clearly motivated by political pressures, as well as situations where the political assumptions have remained more tacit. We will explore cases from both developed and developing countries.

Subjects

urban design | urban design | urban politics | urban politics | design politics | design politics | political extremes | political extremes | urban resilience | urban resilience | public housing | public housing | architecture | architecture | political values | political values | aesthetics | aesthetics | gender politics | gender politics | power | power | capitol design | capitol design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.445 International Relations Theory in the Cyber Age (MIT) 17.445 International Relations Theory in the Cyber Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines cyber dynamics and processes in international relations from different theoretical perspectives. It considers alternative theoretical and empirical frameworks consistent with characteristic features of cyberspace and emergent transformations at all levels of international interaction. Theories examined include realism and neorealism, institutionalism and liberalism, constructivism, and systems theory and lateral pressure. The course also highlights relevant features and proposes customized international relations theory for the cyber age. Students taking the graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research. This course examines cyber dynamics and processes in international relations from different theoretical perspectives. It considers alternative theoretical and empirical frameworks consistent with characteristic features of cyberspace and emergent transformations at all levels of international interaction. Theories examined include realism and neorealism, institutionalism and liberalism, constructivism, and systems theory and lateral pressure. The course also highlights relevant features and proposes customized international relations theory for the cyber age. Students taking the graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | cyber age | cyber age | globalization | globalization | security | security | realism | realism | neorealism | neorealism | governance | governance | institutionalism | institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | cyberpolitics | cyberpolitics | war | war | international conflict | international conflict | global agenda | global agenda | international cooperation | international cooperation | peace | peace | global politics | global politics | power | power | cyberspace | cyberspace | systems | systems | international organization | international organization | cyber security | cyber security | world politics | world politics | networks | networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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International Relations (MIT) International Relations (MIT)

Description

This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior. This graduate course is divided intothree parts. Together they are intended to provide theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives on source and consequences of globalization, focusing on emergent structures and processes, and on the implications of flows of goods and services across national boundaries - with special attention to the issue of migration, on the assumption that people matter and matter a lot. An important concern addressed pertains to the dilemmas of international policies that are shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior.

Subjects

globalization | globalization | migration | migration | international relations | international relations | political science | political science | environment | environment | public policy | public policy | transnational organization | transnational organization | sustainable development | sustainable development | global change | global change | government | government | technology | technology | security | security | civil society | civil society | political theory | political theory | theory | theory | policy | policy | emergent structures | emergent structures | processes | processes | flows | flows | goods | goods | services | services | national boundaries | national boundaries | international trade | international trade | immigration | immigration | international policies | international policies | macro-level | macro-level | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | policy dilemmas | policy dilemmas | comparative politics | comparative politics | integration | integration | national economies | national economies | IR | IR | IPE | IPE | sovereignty | sovereignty | inter-state relations | inter-state relations | supra-state | supra-state | non-state | non-state | narrow globalization | narrow globalization | comlex view | comlex view | international conflict | international conflict | domestic politics | domestic politics | international politics | international politics | population movements | population movements | macro-level behavior | macro-level behavior | complex view | complex view

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT) 17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China. This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China.

Subjects

theoretical and methodological approaches | theoretical and methodological approaches | contemporary Chinese politics | contemporary Chinese politics | broader trends | broader trends | omparative politics | omparative politics | effective ways to integrate area studies | effective ways to integrate area studies | broader comparative approaches | broader comparative approaches | history and politics of contemporary China | history and politics of contemporary China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.123 Big Plans (MIT) 11.123 Big Plans (MIT)

Description

This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered. This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered.

Subjects

large projects | large projects | debate and commitment in advance of action | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | technology | politics | politics | economics | economics | culture | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | ways of generating public support | ways of generating public support | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | environmental impacts | environmental impacts | political accountability | political accountability | health and safety factors | health and safety factors | social equity | social equity | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT) 11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT)

Description

This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial? This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial?

Subjects

how society should respond to poverty | how society should respond to poverty | race | race | politics of welfare | politics of welfare | out-of-wedlock births | out-of-wedlock births | homelessness | homelessness | crime | crime | drugs | drugs | knowledge about poverty and community | knowledge about poverty and community | empowerment from social science research | empowerment from social science research | public discourse and politics | public discourse and politics | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | social controversy | social controversy | 1990s | 1990s | poverty | poverty | welfare | welfare | extra-marital births | extra-marital births | values | values | politics | politics | public policy | public policy | social science research | social science research | public discourse | public discourse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Foundations for politics Foundations for politics

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module introduces students to the intellectual and practical skills they will need for the successful study of politics. Module Code: M11014 Suitable for study at: Undergraduate level 1 Credits:10 Professor Philip Cowley, School of Politics and International Relations Professor Cowley's research interests are primarily in British politics, especially political parties, voting and Parliament. He has three future projects, one major, two more minor. The first is to write the next volume in the British General Election of xxxx series, with Dennis Kavanagh, taking over from David Butler, after his 50+ years involved in the project. As two sidelines, he is This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module introduces students to the intellectual and practical skills they will need for the successful study of politics. Module Code: M11014 Suitable for study at: Undergraduate level 1 Credits:10 Professor Philip Cowley, School of Politics and International Relations Professor Cowley's research interests are primarily in British politics, especially political parties, voting and Parliament. He has three future projects, one major, two more minor. The first is to write the next volume in the British General Election of xxxx series, with Dennis Kavanagh, taking over from David Butler, after his 50+ years involved in the project. As two sidelines, he is

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | module code M11014 | module code M11014 | politics and international relations | politics and international relations | intellectual and practical skills | intellectual and practical skills | developing effective arguments | developing effective arguments | George Orwell and the politics of the English language | George Orwell and the politics of the English language | Having a heated debate | Having a heated debate | study of politics | study of politics

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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17.523 Ethnicity and Race in World Politics (MIT) 17.523 Ethnicity and Race in World Politics (MIT)

Description

Discerning the ethnic and racial dimensions of politics is considered by some indispensable to understanding contemporary world politics. This course seeks to answer fundamental questions about racial and ethnic politics. To begin, what are the bases of ethnic and racial identities? What accounts for political mobilization based upon such identities? What are the political claims and goals of such mobilization and is conflict between groups and/or with government forces inevitable? How do ethnic and racial identities intersect with other identities, such as gender and class, which are themselves the sources of social, political, and economic cleavages? Finally, how are domestic ethnic/racial politics connected to international human rights? To answer these questions, the course begins with Discerning the ethnic and racial dimensions of politics is considered by some indispensable to understanding contemporary world politics. This course seeks to answer fundamental questions about racial and ethnic politics. To begin, what are the bases of ethnic and racial identities? What accounts for political mobilization based upon such identities? What are the political claims and goals of such mobilization and is conflict between groups and/or with government forces inevitable? How do ethnic and racial identities intersect with other identities, such as gender and class, which are themselves the sources of social, political, and economic cleavages? Finally, how are domestic ethnic/racial politics connected to international human rights? To answer these questions, the course begins with

Subjects

ethnic | ethnic | ethnicity | ethnicity | race | race | politics | politics | racial | racial | racial politics | racial politics | ethnic politics | ethnic politics | mobilization | mobilization | identities | identities | gender | gender | class | class | economic | economic | international human rights | international human rights | human rights | human rights | ethnic identity | ethnic identity | africa | africa | asia | asia | latin america | latin america | europe | europe | united states | united states | darfur | darfur | sudan | sudan | bosnia | bosnia | rwanda | rwanda | sovereignty | sovereignty

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.037 American Political Thought (MIT) 17.037 American Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research. This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research.

Subjects

american politics | american politics | united states | united states | political theory | political theory | colonial | colonial | contemporary government | contemporary government | national identity | national identity | individual rights | individual rights | liberalism | liberalism | activism | activism | repulicanism | repulicanism | radicalism | radicalism | revolution | revolution | equality | equality | freedom | freedom | protestants | protestants | protestantism | protestantism | colonial america | colonial america | american revolution | american revolution | debate | debate | constitution | constitution | jeffersonian republicans | jeffersonian republicans | hamiltonian federalists | hamiltonian federalists | madison | madison | individualism | individualism | antebellum america | antebellum america | racism | racism | nativism | nativism | sexism | sexism | new inegalitarians | new inegalitarians | politics of inclusion | politics of inclusion | politics of difference | politics of difference | markets | markets | morals | morals

License

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17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT) 17.544 Comparative Politics and China (MIT)

Description

This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China. This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China.

Subjects

theoretical and methodological approaches | theoretical and methodological approaches | contemporary Chinese politics | contemporary Chinese politics | broader trends | broader trends | omparative politics | omparative politics | effective ways to integrate area studies | effective ways to integrate area studies | broader comparative approaches | broader comparative approaches | history and politics of contemporary China | history and politics of contemporary China

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students as an introduction to politics and the policy process in modern Japan. The semester is divided into two parts. After a two-week general introduction to Japan and to the dominant approaches to the study of Japanese history, politics and society, we will begin exploring five aspects of Japanese politics: party politics, electoral politics, interest group politics, bureaucratic politics, and policy, which will be broken up into seven additional sections. We will try to understand the ways in which the actors and institutions identified in the first part of the semester affect the policy process across a variety of issues areas.

Subjects

finite element methods | solids | structures | fluid mechanics | heat transfer | equilibrium equations | direct integration | mode superposition | eigensolution techniques | frequencies | mode shapes | statics | dynamics | nonlinear systems | wave propagation | Japan | politics | policy | contemporary Japan | electoral politics | interest group politics | party politics | bureaucratic politics | social policy | foreign policy | defense policy | energy policy | science and technology policy | industrial policy | trade policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students. This course provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discussions include research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. The emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.

Subjects

comparative politics | comparative politics | Aristotle | Aristotle | political research | political research | regimes | regimes | Marxist model | Marxist model | class alliances | class alliances | democracy | democracy | pluralism | pluralism | economic growth | economic growth | party formation | party formation | political elites | political elites | interest groups | interest groups | constitutional reform | constitutional reform | political system | political system | constitutional choice | constitutional choice | leadership | leadership | state formation | state formation | modernization | modernization | political institution | political institution | embedded autonomy | embedded autonomy | dead capital | dead capital | nationalism | nationalism | electoral behavior | electoral behavior | clientelism | clientelism | patronage politics | patronage politics | corruption | corruption | self-government | self-government

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.S10 Reproductive Politics in the United States (MIT) WGS.S10 Reproductive Politics in the United States (MIT)

Description

In this seminar, we will explore the significance of struggles over reproductive rights in the United States. Throughout the course, we will ask such questions as: What is reproductive freedom and why has attaining it been so central to women's liberation movements? Why have attempts to regulate reproduction been so prevalent in American politics? In this seminar, we will explore the significance of struggles over reproductive rights in the United States. Throughout the course, we will ask such questions as: What is reproductive freedom and why has attaining it been so central to women's liberation movements? Why have attempts to regulate reproduction been so prevalent in American politics?

Subjects

reproductive politics | reproductive politics | reproduction | reproduction | women's liberation | women's liberation | politics | politics | class | class | race | race | sexuality | sexuality | birth control | birth control | abortion | abortion | pregnancy | pregnancy | fetus | fetus | parenting | parenting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT) 21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture. This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Subjects

american history | american history | nuclear | nuclear | world war two | world war two | twentieth century | twentieth century | foreign policy | foreign policy | cold war | cold war | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | military industrial complex | military industrial complex | baby boom | baby boom | social movements | social movements | postwar economy | postwar economy | Pearl Harbor | Pearl Harbor | America's role | America's role | global superpower | global superpower | foreign anticommunism | foreign anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | The Left | The Left | The Right | The Right | suburbanization | suburbanization | popular culture | popular culture | World War II | World War II | WWII | WWII | 20th century | 20th century | nuclear warfare | nuclear warfare | domestic policy | domestic policy | economic abundance | economic abundance | politics | politics | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | FDR | FDR | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | nuclear war | nuclear war | American politics | American politics | economy | economy | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics. This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | twentieth-century Americans | twentieth-century Americans | 20th century | 20th century | good lif | good lif | leisure | leisure | material abundance | material abundance | department stores | department stores | advertising | advertising | mass-produced cars | mass-produced cars | suburbs | suburbs | American economy | American economy | American society | American society | American politics | American politics | mass market | mass market | turn of the century | turn of the century | middle-class society | middle-class society | interwar America | interwar America | mass culture | mass culture | postwar America | postwar America | conspicuous consumption | conspicuous consumption | good life | good life | cars | cars | automobiles | automobiles | vehicles | vehicles | window | window | storefront | storefront | store | store | shop | shop | showroom | showroom | dealers | dealers | dealership | dealership

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.747-3 Classical Rhetoric and Modern Politics (MIT) 21W.747-3 Classical Rhetoric and Modern Politics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the history, theory, practice, and implications of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion. The course is designed to let you practice your own rhetorical prowess. This combination of reading, speaking, and writing will help you succeed in: Learning to read and think critically. Learning techniques of rhetorical analysis. Learning techniques of argument. Learning and practicing some basics about oral presentation. This course is an introduction to the history, theory, practice, and implications of rhetoric, the art and craft of persuasion. The course is designed to let you practice your own rhetorical prowess. This combination of reading, speaking, and writing will help you succeed in: Learning to read and think critically. Learning techniques of rhetorical analysis. Learning techniques of argument. Learning and practicing some basics about oral presentation.

Subjects

classical rhetoric | classical rhetoric | modern politics | modern politics | aristotle | aristotle | rhetoric | rhetoric | cicero | cicero | plato | plato | gorgias | gorgias | rhetorica ad alexandrum | rhetorica ad alexandrum | persuasion | persuasion | oral presentation | oral presentation | CI-intensive | CI-intensive | Brown vs. Board of Education | Brown vs. Board of Education | Roe vs. Wade | Roe vs. Wade | politics | politics | argument | argument

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.080 Youth Political Participation (MIT) STS.080 Youth Political Participation (MIT)

Description

This course places contemporary youth activities in perspective by surveying young American's political participation over the past 200 years. Each week, students will look at trends in youth political activism during a specific historical period, as well as what difference—if any—youth media production and technology use (radio, music, automobiles, ready-made clothing) made in determining the course of events. A central theme in accounts of political participation by those who have not yet reached the age of majority are the opportunities for mobilization and expression that new technologies supply. This class explores what is truly new about "new media" and reviews lessons from history for present-day activists based on patterns of past failure and success. This course places contemporary youth activities in perspective by surveying young American's political participation over the past 200 years. Each week, students will look at trends in youth political activism during a specific historical period, as well as what difference—if any—youth media production and technology use (radio, music, automobiles, ready-made clothing) made in determining the course of events. A central theme in accounts of political participation by those who have not yet reached the age of majority are the opportunities for mobilization and expression that new technologies supply. This class explores what is truly new about "new media" and reviews lessons from history for present-day activists based on patterns of past failure and success.

Subjects

politics | politics | youth politics | youth politics | political history | political history | political participation | political participation | new media | new media | technology | technology | political activism | political activism | activism | activism | youth groups | youth groups | youth activism | youth activism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT) 21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | Medieval | early modern | early modern | Russia | Russia | history | history | Kievan State | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | international relations | international relations | Western Europe | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | state | society | society | Asia | Asia | foreign influences | foreign influences | foreign relations | foreign relations | Russian history | Russian history | social relations | social relations | nobility | nobility | peasantry | peasantry | town | town | country | country | women | women | men | men | political | political | religious | religious | economic | economic | social factors | social factors | muscovite | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | Golden Horde | government | government | time of troubles | time of troubles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | 17th century | 17th century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 18th century | 18th century | politics | politics | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.342 The Royal Family (MIT) 21H.342 The Royal Family (MIT)

Description

This course is an an exploration of British culture and politics, focusing on the changing role of the monarchy from the accession of the House of Hanover (later Windsor) in 1714 to the present. The dynasty has encountered a series of crises, in which the personal and the political have been inextricably combined: for example, George III's mental illness; the scandalous behavior of his son, George IV; Victoria's withdrawal from public life after the death of Prince Albert; the abdication of Edward VIII; and the public antagonism sparked by sympathy for Diana, Princess of Wales. This course is an an exploration of British culture and politics, focusing on the changing role of the monarchy from the accession of the House of Hanover (later Windsor) in 1714 to the present. The dynasty has encountered a series of crises, in which the personal and the political have been inextricably combined: for example, George III's mental illness; the scandalous behavior of his son, George IV; Victoria's withdrawal from public life after the death of Prince Albert; the abdication of Edward VIII; and the public antagonism sparked by sympathy for Diana, Princess of Wales.

Subjects

england | england | britain | britain | culture | culture | history | history | monarchy | monarchy | windsor | windsor | hanover | hanover | george III | george III | George IV | George IV | victoria | victoria | albert | albert | prince | prince | queen | queen | king | king | edward VIII | edward VIII | diana | diana | princess | princess | dynasty | dynasty | politics | politics | william IV | william IV | empire | empire | elizabeth | elizabeth | George IV | victoria | George IV | victoria | Britain | Britain | British | British | Hanover | Hanover | Windsor | Windsor | 1714 | 1714 | crises | crises | George III | George III | scandal | scandal | Victoria | Victoria | Albert | Albert | abdication | abdication | Edward VIII | Edward VIII | Diana | Diana | Wales | Wales | portraits | portraits | news footage | news footage | films | films | Tudors | Tudors | Stuarts | Stuarts | pageantry | pageantry | royal | royal | George I | George I | George II | George II | England | England | Germany | Germany | regent | regent | William IV | William IV | empress | empress | India | India | Edward VII | Edward VII | George V | George V | war | war | George VI | George VI | Elizabeth II | Elizabeth II | British politics | British politics | British culture | British culture | Accession | Accession | House of Hanover | House of Hanover | House of Windsor | House of Windsor | political | political | mental illness | mental illness | public life | public life | Prince Albert | Prince Albert | Princess of Wales | Princess of Wales | German Kings | German Kings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT) 21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture. This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Subjects

american history | american history | nuclear | nuclear | world war two | world war two | twentieth century | twentieth century | foreign policy | foreign policy | cold war | cold war | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | military industrial complex | military industrial complex | baby boom | baby boom | social movements | social movements | postwar economy | postwar economy | Pearl Harbor | Pearl Harbor | America's role | America's role | global superpower | global superpower | foreign anticommunism | foreign anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | The Left | The Left | The Right | The Right | suburbanization | suburbanization | popular culture | popular culture | World War II | World War II | WWII | WWII | 20th century | 20th century | nuclear warfare | nuclear warfare | domestic policy | domestic policy | economic abundance | economic abundance | politics | politics | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | FDR | FDR | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | nuclear war | nuclear war | American politics | American politics | economy | economy | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Going into Politics? Tales from an Academic in Westminster

Description

Professor Marc Stears reflects on his experiences. Marc Stears is a Professor of Political Theory and fellow at University College. He is the author of Demanding Democracy: American Radicals in Search of a New Politics and is one of the co-editors of the widely discussed The Labour Tradition and the Politics of Paradox. He is currently visiting fellow at Britain's leading think tank, the Institute for Public Policy Research, and he works closely with many of Britain's most prominent politicians on questions of political strategy and communication. Chaired by Mark Philp, Fellow and Tutor in Politics at Oriel College who works on political theory, the history of political thought, and is interested in political ethics, corruption and standards in public life. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

politics | alumni | academia in politics | politics | alumni | academia in politics | 2012-09-15

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Party Games: Coalition Government in British Politics

Description

Professor Hawkins will look at the history of coalition government in British politics over the past 200 years and discuss some of the constitutional implications of the current Conservative/Liberal Democrat government under David Cameron and Nick Clegg. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

british politics | clegg | alumni | coalition | liberal democrats | conservatives | cameron | politics | british politics | clegg | alumni | coalition | liberal democrats | conservatives | cameron | politics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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