Searching for polymers : 73 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3

3.91 Mechanical Behavior of Plastics (MIT) 3.91 Mechanical Behavior of Plastics (MIT)

Description

This course is aimed at presenting the concepts underlying the response of polymeric materials to applied loads. These will include both the molecular mechanisms involved and the mathematical description of the relevant continuum mechanics. It is dominantly an "engineering" subject, but with an atomistic flavor. It covers the influence of processing and structure on mechanical properties of synthetic and natural polymers: Hookean and entropic elastic deformation, linear viscoelasticity, composite materials and laminates, yield and fracture. This course is aimed at presenting the concepts underlying the response of polymeric materials to applied loads. These will include both the molecular mechanisms involved and the mathematical description of the relevant continuum mechanics. It is dominantly an "engineering" subject, but with an atomistic flavor. It covers the influence of processing and structure on mechanical properties of synthetic and natural polymers: Hookean and entropic elastic deformation, linear viscoelasticity, composite materials and laminates, yield and fracture.

Subjects

plastics; synthetic high polymers; viscoelastic phenomena; viscoelastic and strength properties; mechanical property evaluation; plastics fabrication methods | plastics; synthetic high polymers; viscoelastic phenomena; viscoelastic and strength properties; mechanical property evaluation; plastics fabrication methods | plastics | plastics | synthetic high polymers | synthetic high polymers | viscoelastic phenomena | viscoelastic phenomena | viscoelastic and strength properties | viscoelastic and strength properties | mechanical property evaluation | mechanical property evaluation | plastics fabrication methods | plastics fabrication methods

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Biomaterials Chemistry (MIT) Biomaterials Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course covers principles of materials chemistry common to organic materials ranging from biological polypeptides to engineered block copolymers. Topics include molecular structure, polymer synthesis reactions, protein-protein interactions, multifunctional organic materials including polymeric nanoreactors, conducting polymers and virus-mediated biomineralization. WARNING NOTICE The experiments described in these materials are potentially hazardous and require a high level of safety training, special facilities and equipment, and supervision by appropriate individuals. You bear the sole responsibility, liability, and risk for the implementation of such safety procedures and measures. MIT shall have no responsibility, liability, or risk for the content or implementation of any of the ma This course covers principles of materials chemistry common to organic materials ranging from biological polypeptides to engineered block copolymers. Topics include molecular structure, polymer synthesis reactions, protein-protein interactions, multifunctional organic materials including polymeric nanoreactors, conducting polymers and virus-mediated biomineralization. WARNING NOTICE The experiments described in these materials are potentially hazardous and require a high level of safety training, special facilities and equipment, and supervision by appropriate individuals. You bear the sole responsibility, liability, and risk for the implementation of such safety procedures and measures. MIT shall have no responsibility, liability, or risk for the content or implementation of any of the ma

Subjects

polymeric nanoreactors | polymeric nanoreactors | virus-mediated biomineralization | virus-mediated biomineralization | conducting polymers | conducting polymers | biomaterials chemistry | biomaterials chemistry | organic materials | organic materials | polypeptides | polypeptides | block copolymers | block copolymers | polymer synthesis | polymer synthesis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.91J Mechanical Behavior of Plastics (MIT) 3.91J Mechanical Behavior of Plastics (MIT)

Description

Relation among chemical composition, physical structure, and mechanical behavior of plastics or synthetic high polymers. Study of types of polymers; fundamentals of viscoelastic phenomena such as creep, stress relaxation, stress rupture, mechanical damping, impact; effects of chemical composition and structure on viscoelastic and strength properties; methods of mechanical property evaluation. Influences of plastics fabrication methods. Emphasis on recent research techniques and results. Individual laboratory projects investigating problems related to current research. Relation among chemical composition, physical structure, and mechanical behavior of plastics or synthetic high polymers. Study of types of polymers; fundamentals of viscoelastic phenomena such as creep, stress relaxation, stress rupture, mechanical damping, impact; effects of chemical composition and structure on viscoelastic and strength properties; methods of mechanical property evaluation. Influences of plastics fabrication methods. Emphasis on recent research techniques and results. Individual laboratory projects investigating problems related to current research.

Subjects

plastics | | plastics | | synthetic high polymers | | synthetic high polymers | | viscoelastic phenomena | | viscoelastic phenomena | | viscoelastic and strength properties | | viscoelastic and strength properties | | mechanical property evaluation | | mechanical property evaluation | | plastics fabrication methods | plastics fabrication methods | plastics | plastics | synthetic high polymers | synthetic high polymers | viscoelastic phenomena | viscoelastic phenomena | viscoelastic and strength properties | viscoelastic and strength properties | mechanical property evaluation | mechanical property evaluation | 3.91 | 3.91 | 1.593 | 1.593

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering. This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Subjects

Interactions between proteins | Interactions between proteins | cells | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Biosensors | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Interactions between proteins | cells | Interactions between proteins | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | BE.340J | BE.340J | 3.051 | 3.051 | BE.340 | BE.340 | 20.340 | 20.340

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

10.467 Polymer Science Laboratory (MIT) 10.467 Polymer Science Laboratory (MIT)

Description

Experiments in this class are broadly aimed at acquainting students with the range of properties of polymers, methods of synthesis, and physical chemistry. Some examples of laboratory work include solution polymerization of acrylamide, bead polymerization of divinylbenzene, and interfacial polymerization of nylon 6,10. Evaluation of networks by tensile and swelling experiments, rheology of polymer solutions and suspensions, and physical properties of natural and silicone rubber are also covered. Experiments in this class are broadly aimed at acquainting students with the range of properties of polymers, methods of synthesis, and physical chemistry. Some examples of laboratory work include solution polymerization of acrylamide, bead polymerization of divinylbenzene, and interfacial polymerization of nylon 6,10. Evaluation of networks by tensile and swelling experiments, rheology of polymer solutions and suspensions, and physical properties of natural and silicone rubber are also covered.

Subjects

polymers | polymers | polymer laboratory | polymer laboratory | polymer experiments | polymer experiments | properties of polymers | properties of polymers | methods of polymer synthesis | methods of polymer synthesis | physical chemistry | physical chemistry | solution polymerization of acrylamide | solution polymerization of acrylamide | bead polymerization of divinylbenzene | bead polymerization of divinylbenzene | interfacial polymerization of nylon 6 | interfacial polymerization of nylon 6 | 10 | 10 | evaluation of networks by tensile and swelling experiments | evaluation of networks by tensile and swelling experiments | rheology of polymer solutions and suspensions | rheology of polymer solutions and suspensions | physical properties of natural and silicone rubber | physical properties of natural and silicone rubber

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-10.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Using composite materials to replace bone Using composite materials to replace bone

Description

For the past ten years, Professor Rudd and his team have been researching degradable polymers that would be as strong as the steel plates, but could be absorbed by the body, thus eliminating the need for secondary surgery. For the past ten years, Professor Rudd and his team have been researching degradable polymers that would be as strong as the steel plates, but could be absorbed by the body, thus eliminating the need for secondary surgery. In this podcast, Professor Chris Rudd, Dean of the faculty of Engineering at the University of Nottingham, describes his work with composite materials in the car industry and how it can be applied to the field of medicine. Traditionally, patients who have lost bone in an accident or have had bone removed due to cancer have had to endure two very long and very painful operations. One operation to attach steel plates to the bone, and a second operation once the bone has healed, to remove them. For the past ten years, Professor Rudd and his team have been researching degradable polymers that would be as strong as the steel plates, but could be absorbed by the body, thus eliminating the need for secondary surgery. In this podcast, Professor Chris Rudd, Dean of the faculty of Engineering at the University of Nottingham, describes his work with composite materials in the car industry and how it can be applied to the field of medicine. Traditionally, patients who have lost bone in an accident or have had bone removed due to cancer have had to endure two very long and very painful operations. One operation to attach steel plates to the bone, and a second operation once the bone has healed, to remove them. For the past ten years, Professor Rudd and his team have been researching degradable polymers that would be as strong as the steel plates, but could be absorbed by the body, thus eliminating the need for secondary surgery.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Bone replacement | Bone replacement | Degradable polymers in the body | Degradable polymers in the body | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

Site sourced from

http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/rss.ashx

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

2.002 Mechanics and Materials II (MIT) 2.002 Mechanics and Materials II (MIT)

Description

This course provides Mechanical Engineering students with an awareness of various responses exhibited by solid engineering materials when subjected to mechanical and thermal loadings; an introduction to the physical mechanisms associated with design-limiting behavior of engineering materials, especially stiffness, strength, toughness, and durability; an understanding of basic mechanical properties of engineering materials, testing procedures used to quantify these properties, and ways in which these properties characterize material response; quantitative skills to deal with materials-limiting problems in engineering design; and a basis for materials selection in mechanical design. This course provides Mechanical Engineering students with an awareness of various responses exhibited by solid engineering materials when subjected to mechanical and thermal loadings; an introduction to the physical mechanisms associated with design-limiting behavior of engineering materials, especially stiffness, strength, toughness, and durability; an understanding of basic mechanical properties of engineering materials, testing procedures used to quantify these properties, and ways in which these properties characterize material response; quantitative skills to deal with materials-limiting problems in engineering design; and a basis for materials selection in mechanical design.

Subjects

beam bending | beam bending | buckling | buckling | vibration | vibration | polymers | polymers | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | strength | strength | ductility | ductility | stress | stress | stress concentration | stress concentration | sheet bending | sheet bending | heat treatment | heat treatment | fracture | fracture | plasticity | plasticity | creep | creep | fatigue | fatigue | solid materials | solid materials | mechanical loading | mechanical loading | thermal loading | thermal loading | design-limiting behavior | design-limiting behavior | stiffness | stiffness | toughness | toughness | durability | durability | engineering materials | engineering materials | materials-limiting problem | materials-limiting problem | materials selection | materials selection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

8.592J Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT) 8.592J Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT)

Description

Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution. Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.

Subjects

Bioinformatics | Bioinformatics | DNA | DNA | gene finding | gene finding | sequence comparison | sequence comparison | phylogenetic trees | phylogenetic trees | biopolymers | biopolymers | DNA double helix | DNA double helix | secondary structure of RNA | secondary structure of RNA | protein folding | protein folding | protein motors | protein motors | membranes | membranes | cellular networks | cellular networks | neural networks | neural networks | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications. Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications.

Subjects

Phenomenology | Phenomenology | mechanical behavior | mechanical behavior | material structure | material structure | deformation | deformation | failure | failure | elasticity | elasticity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | creep | creep | fracture | fracture | fatigue | fatigue | metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | thin films | thin films | carbon nanotubes | carbon nanotubes | battery materials | battery materials | superelastic alloys | superelastic alloys | defect nucleation | defect nucleation | student projects | student projects | viral capsides | viral capsides

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others. This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | structure | structure | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials | magnetism | magnetism | polarity | polarity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | fracture | fracture | materials selection | materials selection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

Subjects

interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

8.592J Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT) 8.592J Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT)

Description

Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution. Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.

Subjects

8.592 | 8.592 | HST.452 | HST.452 | Statistical physics | Statistical physics | Bioinformatics | Bioinformatics | DNA | DNA | gene finding | gene finding | sequence comparison | sequence comparison | phylogenetic trees | phylogenetic trees | biopolymers | biopolymers | DNA double helix | DNA double helix | secondary structure of RNA | secondary structure of RNA | protein folding | protein folding | protein motors | protein motors | membranes | membranes | cellular networks | cellular networks | neural networks | neural networks | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.11 Mechanics of Materials (MIT) 3.11 Mechanics of Materials (MIT)

Description

Overview of mechanical properties of ceramics, metals, and polymers, emphasizing the role of processing and microstructure in controlling these properties. Basic topics in mechanics of materials including: continuum stress and strain, truss forces, torsion of a circular shaft and beam bending. Design of engineering structures from a materials point of view. Overview of mechanical properties of ceramics, metals, and polymers, emphasizing the role of processing and microstructure in controlling these properties. Basic topics in mechanics of materials including: continuum stress and strain, truss forces, torsion of a circular shaft and beam bending. Design of engineering structures from a materials point of view.

Subjects

beam bending | beam bending | circular shaft bending | circular shaft bending | truss forces | truss forces | continuum stress and strain | continuum stress and strain | polymers | polymers | metals | metals | ceramics | ceramics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

10.467 Polymer Science Laboratory (MIT)

Description

Experiments in this class are broadly aimed at acquainting students with the range of properties of polymers, methods of synthesis, and physical chemistry. Some examples of laboratory work include solution polymerization of acrylamide, bead polymerization of divinylbenzene, and interfacial polymerization of nylon 6,10. Evaluation of networks by tensile and swelling experiments, rheology of polymer solutions and suspensions, and physical properties of natural and silicone rubber are also covered.

Subjects

polymers | polymer laboratory | polymer experiments | properties of polymers | methods of polymer synthesis | physical chemistry | solution polymerization of acrylamide | bead polymerization of divinylbenzene | interfacial polymerization of nylon 6 | 10 | evaluation of networks by tensile and swelling experiments | rheology of polymer solutions and suspensions | physical properties of natural and silicone rubber

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.35 Fracture and Fatigue (MIT) 3.35 Fracture and Fatigue (MIT)

Description

Investigation of linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Topics include microstructural effects on fracture in metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials and composites, toughening mechanisms, crack growth resistance and creep fracture. Also covered: interface fracture mechanics, fatigue damage and dislocation substructures in single crystals, stress- and strain-life approach to fatigue, fatigue crack growth models and mechanisms, variable amplitude fatigue, corrosion fatigue and case studies of fracture and fatigue in structural, bioimplant, and microelectronic components. Investigation of linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Topics include microstructural effects on fracture in metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials and composites, toughening mechanisms, crack growth resistance and creep fracture. Also covered: interface fracture mechanics, fatigue damage and dislocation substructures in single crystals, stress- and strain-life approach to fatigue, fatigue crack growth models and mechanisms, variable amplitude fatigue, corrosion fatigue and case studies of fracture and fatigue in structural, bioimplant, and microelectronic components.

Subjects

Linear elastic | Linear elastic | elastic-plastic fracture mechanics | elastic-plastic fracture mechanics | Microstructural effects on fracture | Microstructural effects on fracture | Toughening mechanisms | Toughening mechanisms | Crack growth resistance | Crack growth resistance | creep fracture | creep fracture | Interface fracture mechanics | Interface fracture mechanics | Fatigue damage | Fatigue damage | dislocation substructures | dislocation substructures | Variable amplitude fatigue | Variable amplitude fatigue | Corrosion fatigue | Corrosion fatigue | experimental methods | experimental methods | microstructural effects | microstructural effects | metals | metals | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | thin films | thin films | biological materials | biological materials | composites | composites | single crystals | single crystals | stress-life | stress-life | strain-life | strain-life | structural components | structural components | bioimplant components | bioimplant components | microelectronic components | microelectronic components | case studies | case studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.064 Polymer Engineering (MIT) 3.064 Polymer Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course offers and overview of engineering analysis and design techniques for synthetic polymers. Treatment of materials properties selection, mechanical characterization, and processing in design of load-bearing and environment-compatible structures are covered. This course offers and overview of engineering analysis and design techniques for synthetic polymers. Treatment of materials properties selection, mechanical characterization, and processing in design of load-bearing and environment-compatible structures are covered.

Subjects

engineering analysis | engineering analysis | design techniques | design techniques | synthetic polymers | synthetic polymers | materials properties selection | materials properties selection | mechanical characterization | mechanical characterization | design of load-bearing and environment-compatible structures | design of load-bearing and environment-compatible structures | load-bearing structures | load-bearing structures | environment-compatible structures | environment-compatible structures | processing methods | processing methods | materials specification | materials specification | design drawing | design drawing | polymeric load-bearing articles | polymeric load-bearing articles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science (MIT) 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science (MIT)

Description

This subject describes the fundamentals of bonding, energetics, and structure that underpin materials science. From electrons to silicon to DNA: the role of electronic bonding in determining the energy, structure, and stability of materials. Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms. Symmetry properties of molecules and solids. Structure of complex and disordered materials. Introduction to thermodynamic functions and laws governing equilibrium properties, relating macroscopic behavior to molecular models of materials. Develops basis for understanding a broad range of materials phenomena, from heat capacities, phase transformations, and multiphase equilibria to chemical reactions and magnetism. Fundamentals are taught using real-world examples such as engineered all This subject describes the fundamentals of bonding, energetics, and structure that underpin materials science. From electrons to silicon to DNA: the role of electronic bonding in determining the energy, structure, and stability of materials. Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms. Symmetry properties of molecules and solids. Structure of complex and disordered materials. Introduction to thermodynamic functions and laws governing equilibrium properties, relating macroscopic behavior to molecular models of materials. Develops basis for understanding a broad range of materials phenomena, from heat capacities, phase transformations, and multiphase equilibria to chemical reactions and magnetism. Fundamentals are taught using real-world examples such as engineered all

Subjects

fundamentals of bonding | energetics | and structure | fundamentals of bonding | energetics | and structure | Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms | Quantum mechanical descriptions of interacting electrons and atoms | Symmetry properties of molecules and solids | Symmetry properties of molecules and solids | complex and disordered materials | complex and disordered materials | thermodynamic functions | thermodynamic functions | equilibrium properties | equilibrium properties | macroscopic behavior | macroscopic behavior | molecular models | molecular models | heat capacities | heat capacities | phase transformations | phase transformations | multiphase equilibria | multiphase equilibria | chemical reactions | chemical reactions | magnetism | magnetism | engineered alloys | engineered alloys | electronic and magnetic materials | electronic and magnetic materials | ionic and network solids | ionic and network solids | polymers | polymers | biomaterials | biomaterials | energetics | energetics | structure | structure | materials science | materials science | electrons | electrons | silicon | silicon | DNA | DNA | electronic bonding | electronic bonding | energy | energy | stability | stability | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | atoms | atoms | interactions | interactions | symmetry | symmetry | molecules | molecules | solids | solids | complex material | complex material | disorderd materials | disorderd materials | thermodynamic laws | thermodynamic laws | electronic materials | electronic materials | magnetic materials | magnetic materials | ionic solids | ionic solids | network solids | network solids | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | microstates | microstates | microscopic complexity | microscopic complexity | entropy | entropy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Biomaterials Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This course covers principles of materials chemistry common to organic materials ranging from biological polypeptides to engineered block copolymers. Topics include molecular structure, polymer synthesis reactions, protein-protein interactions, multifunctional organic materials including polymeric nanoreactors, conducting polymers and virus-mediated biomineralization. WARNING NOTICE The experiments described in these materials are potentially hazardous and require a high level of safety training, special facilities and equipment, and supervision by appropriate individuals. You bear the sole responsibility, liability, and risk for the implementation of such safety procedures and measures. MIT shall have no responsibility, liability, or risk for the content or implementation of any of the ma

Subjects

polymeric nanoreactors | virus-mediated biomineralization | conducting polymers | biomaterials chemistry | organic materials | polypeptides | block copolymers | polymer synthesis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings | 16.01 | 16.01 | 16.02 | 16.02 | 16.03 | 16.03 | 16.04 | 16.04

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

20.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (MIT) 20.462J Molecular Principles of Biomaterials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, vaccines, and cell-guiding surfaces. This course covers the analysis and design at a molecular scale of materials used in contact with biological systems, including biotechnology and biomedical engineering. Topics include molecular interactions between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of state-of-the-art materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, vaccines, and cell-guiding surfaces.

Subjects

biomaterials | biomaterials | biomaterial engineering | biomaterial engineering | biotechnology | biotechnology | cell-guiding surface | cell-guiding surface | molecular biomaterials | molecular biomaterials | drug release | drug release | polymers | polymers | pulsatile release | pulsatile release | polymerization | polymerization | polyer erosion | polyer erosion | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | hydrogels | hydrogels | adhesion | adhesion | migration | migration | drug diffusion | drug diffusion | molecular switches | molecular switches | molecular motors | molecular motors | nanoparticles | nanoparticles | microparticles | microparticles | vaccines | vaccines | drug targeting | drug targeting | micro carriers | micro carriers | nano carriers | nano carriers | intracellular drug delivery | intracellular drug delivery | 20.462 | 20.462 | 3.962 | 3.962

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

8.592 Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT) 8.592 Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT)

Description

Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; Considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.Technical RequirementsAny number of biological sequence comparison software tools can be used to import the .fna files found on this course site. Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; Considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.Technical RequirementsAny number of biological sequence comparison software tools can be used to import the .fna files found on this course site.

Subjects

Bioinformatics | Bioinformatics | DNA | DNA | gene finding | gene finding | sequence comparison | sequence comparison | phylogenetic trees | phylogenetic trees | biopolymers | biopolymers | DNA double helix | DNA double helix | secondary structure of RNA | secondary structure of RNA | protein folding | protein folding | protein motors | membranes | protein motors | membranes | cellular networks | cellular networks | neural networks | neural networks | evolution | evolution | statistical physics | statistical physics | molecular biology | molecular biology | deoxyribonucleic acid | deoxyribonucleic acid | genes | genes | genetics | genetics | gene sequencing | gene sequencing | phylogenetics | phylogenetics | double helix | double helix | RNA | RNA | ribonucleic acid | ribonucleic acid | force | force | motion | motion | packaging | packaging | protein motors | protein motors | membranes | membranes | biochemistry | biochemistry | genome | genome | optimization | optimization | partitioning | partitioning | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | collective behavior | collective behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.91J Mechanical Behavior of Plastics (MIT)

Description

Relation among chemical composition, physical structure, and mechanical behavior of plastics or synthetic high polymers. Study of types of polymers; fundamentals of viscoelastic phenomena such as creep, stress relaxation, stress rupture, mechanical damping, impact; effects of chemical composition and structure on viscoelastic and strength properties; methods of mechanical property evaluation. Influences of plastics fabrication methods. Emphasis on recent research techniques and results. Individual laboratory projects investigating problems related to current research.

Subjects

plastics | | synthetic high polymers | | viscoelastic phenomena | | viscoelastic and strength properties | | mechanical property evaluation | | plastics fabrication methods | plastics | synthetic high polymers | viscoelastic phenomena | viscoelastic and strength properties | mechanical property evaluation | 3.91 | 1.593

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.91 Mechanical Behavior of Plastics (MIT)

Description

This course is aimed at presenting the concepts underlying the response of polymeric materials to applied loads. These will include both the molecular mechanisms involved and the mathematical description of the relevant continuum mechanics. It is dominantly an "engineering" subject, but with an atomistic flavor. It covers the influence of processing and structure on mechanical properties of synthetic and natural polymers: Hookean and entropic elastic deformation, linear viscoelasticity, composite materials and laminates, yield and fracture.

Subjects

plastics; synthetic high polymers; viscoelastic phenomena; viscoelastic and strength properties; mechanical property evaluation; plastics fabrication methods | plastics | synthetic high polymers | viscoelastic phenomena | viscoelastic and strength properties | mechanical property evaluation | plastics fabrication methods

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

3.082 Materials Processing Laboratory (MIT) 3.082 Materials Processing Laboratory (MIT)

Description

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using appropriate processing technologies (injection molding, thermoforming, investment casting, powder processing, brazing, etc.). Emphasis on teamwork, project management, communications and computer skills, and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Goals include developing an understanding of the practical applications of MSE; trade-offs between design, processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided. Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using appropriate processing technologies (injection molding, thermoforming, investment casting, powder processing, brazing, etc.). Emphasis on teamwork, project management, communications and computer skills, and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Goals include developing an understanding of the practical applications of MSE; trade-offs between design, processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

Subjects

investment casting of metals | investment casting of metals | injection molding of polymers | injection molding of polymers | sintering of ceramics | sintering of ceramics | operating processing equipment | operating processing equipment | materials engineering project management | materials engineering project management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata