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4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT) 4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and so-called "primitive" art. This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and so-called "primitive" art.

Subjects

modern art; high art; mass culture; modernist aesthetic; modernism; 19th Century Art; 20th Century Art; modernization; urbanization; globalization; photography; cinema; painting; sculpture; postmodernism; visual arts; multimedia; pop art; popular culture | modern art; high art; mass culture; modernist aesthetic; modernism; 19th Century Art; 20th Century Art; modernization; urbanization; globalization; photography; cinema; painting; sculpture; postmodernism; visual arts; multimedia; pop art; popular culture | modern art | modern art | high art | high art | mass culture | mass culture | modernist aesthetic | modernist aesthetic | modernism | modernism | 19th Century Art | 19th Century Art | 20th Century Art | 20th Century Art | modernization | modernization | urbanization | urbanization | globalization | globalization | photography | photography | cinema | cinema | painting | painting | sculpture | sculpture | postmodernism | postmodernism | visual arts | visual arts | multimedia | multimedia | pop art | pop art | popular culture | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Culture Shock! Writing, Editing, and Publishing in Cyberspace (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience - specifically, prose grounded in, though not confined to, personal narrative and perspective. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience - specifically, prose grounded in, though not confined to, personal narrative and perspective. The focus of our reading and your writing will be American popular culture, broadly defined. That is, you will write essays that engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence.

Subjects

public audience | public audience | personal narrative | personal narrative | perspective | perspective | American popular culture | American popular culture | personal voice | personal voice | presence | presence | contemporary America | contemporary America | online magazine | online magazine | memoir | memoir | essay | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics. This course examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. Explores how such things as department stores, advertising, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society and politics.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | twentieth-century Americans | twentieth-century Americans | 20th century | 20th century | good lif | good lif | leisure | leisure | material abundance | material abundance | department stores | department stores | advertising | advertising | mass-produced cars | mass-produced cars | suburbs | suburbs | American economy | American economy | American society | American society | American politics | American politics | mass market | mass market | turn of the century | turn of the century | middle-class society | middle-class society | interwar America | interwar America | mass culture | mass culture | postwar America | postwar America | conspicuous consumption | conspicuous consumption | good life | good life | cars | cars | automobiles | automobiles | vehicles | vehicles | window | window | storefront | storefront | store | store | shop | shop | showroom | showroom | dealers | dealers | dealership | dealership

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT) 21G.030 East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop (MIT)

Description

The course examines various aspects of culture in both pre-modern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.). Each week we will analyze a specific cultural phenomenon, or aspect of material culture, from China, Japan or Korea in order to gain insights into the cultures of these countries. We will also consider the central influence of major philosophical systems such as Confucianism and Buddhism on East Asian cultures. A comparative perspective will be employed to examine the cultural links, and the cultural differences between these three countries of East Asia (as well as Hong Kong and Taiwan). The course will also introduce students to a variety of methodologies for the study of culture (e. g. cultu The course examines various aspects of culture in both pre-modern and modern East Asia, ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary pop culture (film, manga, anime, etc.). Each week we will analyze a specific cultural phenomenon, or aspect of material culture, from China, Japan or Korea in order to gain insights into the cultures of these countries. We will also consider the central influence of major philosophical systems such as Confucianism and Buddhism on East Asian cultures. A comparative perspective will be employed to examine the cultural links, and the cultural differences between these three countries of East Asia (as well as Hong Kong and Taiwan). The course will also introduce students to a variety of methodologies for the study of culture (e. g. cultu

Subjects

East Asia | East Asia | culture | culture | literature | literature | art | art | performance | performance | food | food | religion | religion | popular culture | popular culture | film | film | pop music | pop music | karaoke | karaoke | manga | manga | China | China | Japan | Japan | Korea | Korea | Taiwan | Taiwan | Hong Kong | Hong Kong | women's culture | women's culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-3 Culture Shock! (MIT) 21W.731-3 Culture Shock! (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience--specifically, prose grounded in, but not confined to, personal narrative. That is, you will write essays that engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of articles that address current issues in popular culture along with essays, pieces of carefully-crafted nonfiction, by writers, scientists, philosophers, poets, historians, literary scholars, and many others. These essays will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world, using personal narrative and memoir to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal in the variet This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience--specifically, prose grounded in, but not confined to, personal narrative. That is, you will write essays that engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of articles that address current issues in popular culture along with essays, pieces of carefully-crafted nonfiction, by writers, scientists, philosophers, poets, historians, literary scholars, and many others. These essays will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world, using personal narrative and memoir to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal in the variet

Subjects

personal narrative | personal narrative | public audience | public audience | American popular culture | American popular culture | personal voice | personal voice | nonfiction | nonfiction | memoir | memoir | essay | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT) 4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, prints, performance and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and "primitive" art. This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, prints, performance and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and "primitive" art.

Subjects

modern art | modern art | high art | high art | mass culture | mass culture | modernist aesthetic | modernist aesthetic | modernism | modernism | 19th Century Art | 19th Century Art | 20th Century Art | 20th Century Art | modernization | modernization | urbanization | urbanization | globalization | globalization | photography | photography | cinema | cinema | painting | painting | sculpture | sculpture | postmodernism | postmodernism | visual arts | visual arts | multimedia | multimedia | pop art | pop art | popular culture | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance. This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | advertising | advertising | status | status | American Dream | American Dream | mass-market | mass-market | suburbs | suburbs | e-commerce | e-commerce | fast food | fast food

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.575J Women in South Asia from 1800 to Present (MIT) 21H.575J Women in South Asia from 1800 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce and help students understand the changes and continuities in the lives of women in South Asia from a historical perspective. Using gender as a lens of examining the past, we will examine how politics of race, class, caste and religion affected and continue to impact women in South Asian countries, primarily in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. We will reflect upon current debates within South Asian women's history in order to examine some of the issues and problems that arise in re-writing the past from a gendered perspective and these are found in primary documents, secondary readings, films, newspaper articles, and the Internet. This course is designed to introduce and help students understand the changes and continuities in the lives of women in South Asia from a historical perspective. Using gender as a lens of examining the past, we will examine how politics of race, class, caste and religion affected and continue to impact women in South Asian countries, primarily in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. We will reflect upon current debates within South Asian women's history in order to examine some of the issues and problems that arise in re-writing the past from a gendered perspective and these are found in primary documents, secondary readings, films, newspaper articles, and the Internet.

Subjects

21H.575 | 21H.575 | WGS.459 | WGS.459 | mother | mother | daughter | daughter | in-law | in-law | wive | wive | courtesan | courtesan | concubine | concubine | divinities | divinities | devotee | devotee | social reform | social reform | india | india | education | education | religion | religion | gender | gender | law | law | colonial india | colonial india | british empire | british empire | good wife | good wife | harem | harem | political participation | political participation | women's work | women's work | empower | empower | birth control | birth control | gandhi | gandhi | public health | public health | activism | activism | partition | partition | dowry | dowry | rape | rape | sati | sati | civil code | civil code | religious fundamentalism | religious fundamentalism | sexualty | sexualty | popular culture | popular culture | globalization | globalization | feminism | feminism | south asian women | south asian women

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT) 21H.131 America in the Nuclear Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture. This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Subjects

american history | american history | nuclear | nuclear | world war two | world war two | twentieth century | twentieth century | foreign policy | foreign policy | cold war | cold war | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | military industrial complex | military industrial complex | baby boom | baby boom | social movements | social movements | postwar economy | postwar economy | Pearl Harbor | Pearl Harbor | America's role | America's role | global superpower | global superpower | foreign anticommunism | foreign anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | domestic anticommunism | The Left | The Left | The Right | The Right | suburbanization | suburbanization | popular culture | popular culture | World War II | World War II | WWII | WWII | 20th century | 20th century | nuclear warfare | nuclear warfare | domestic policy | domestic policy | economic abundance | economic abundance | politics | politics | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | Franklin Delano Roosevelt | FDR | FDR | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | nuclear war | nuclear war | American politics | American politics | economy | economy | society | society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.105 American Classics (MIT) 21H.105 American Classics (MIT)

Description

"What then is the American, this new man?" asked J. Hector St-John de Crèvecoeur in his Letters from an American Farmer in 1782. This subject takes Crèvecoeur's question as the starting point for an examination of the changing meanings of national identity in the American past. We will consider a diverse collection of classic texts in American history to see how Americans have defined themselves and their nation in politics, literature, art, and popular culture. As a communications-intensive subject, students will be expected to engage intensively with the material through frequent oral and written exercises. "What then is the American, this new man?" asked J. Hector St-John de Crèvecoeur in his Letters from an American Farmer in 1782. This subject takes Crèvecoeur's question as the starting point for an examination of the changing meanings of national identity in the American past. We will consider a diverse collection of classic texts in American history to see how Americans have defined themselves and their nation in politics, literature, art, and popular culture. As a communications-intensive subject, students will be expected to engage intensively with the material through frequent oral and written exercises.

Subjects

American history | American history | national identity | national identity | popular culture | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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American Society (MIT) American Society (MIT)

Description

Writing in the wake of the Civil War, poet Walt Whitman insisted that "the real war will never get in the books." Throughout American history, the experience of war has fundamentally shaped the ways that Americans think about themselves, their fellow Americans, and the meanings of national citizenship. War has also posed challenges of representation, both for those who fought as well as those who did not. This subject examines how Americans have told the stories of modern war in history, literature, and popular culture, and interprets them in terms of changing ideas about American national identity. Writing in the wake of the Civil War, poet Walt Whitman insisted that "the real war will never get in the books." Throughout American history, the experience of war has fundamentally shaped the ways that Americans think about themselves, their fellow Americans, and the meanings of national citizenship. War has also posed challenges of representation, both for those who fought as well as those who did not. This subject examines how Americans have told the stories of modern war in history, literature, and popular culture, and interprets them in terms of changing ideas about American national identity.

Subjects

Civil War | Civil War | war | war | citizenship | citizenship | representation | representation | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | literature | literature | national identity | national identity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.430 Popular Narrative: Masterminds (MIT) 21L.430 Popular Narrative: Masterminds (MIT)

Description

Our purpose is to consider some of the most elaborate and thoughtful efforts to define and delineate "all-mastering," and to consider some of the delineations of "all-mastering the intellect" in various guises - from magicians to master spies to detectives to scientists (mad and otherwise). The major written work of the term will be an ongoing reading journal, which you will circulate to your classmates using an e-mail mailing list. The use of that list is fundamental - it is my intention to generate a sort of ongoing cyberconversation. Our purpose is to consider some of the most elaborate and thoughtful efforts to define and delineate "all-mastering," and to consider some of the delineations of "all-mastering the intellect" in various guises - from magicians to master spies to detectives to scientists (mad and otherwise). The major written work of the term will be an ongoing reading journal, which you will circulate to your classmates using an e-mail mailing list. The use of that list is fundamental - it is my intention to generate a sort of ongoing cyberconversation.

Subjects

Mastering | Mastering | mastery | mastery | narrative | narrative | popular culture | popular culture | media | media | convergence | convergence | film | film | television | television | spies | spies | detectives | detectives | intellect | intellect | magician | magician | scientists | scientists | graduate students | graduate students | journals | journals | SP.492 | SP.492

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed. This class explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its 30 year presence in the American cultural imagery. Students also investigate specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Students create material culture related to each thematic section of the course. Scheduled work in performance studio helps students understand how hip hop is created and assessed.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | breaking | breaking | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | African-American | African-American | world music | world music | DJ | DJ | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | misogyny | misogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | racism | racism | turntablism | turntablism | gangsta | gangsta | gangster | gangster | beats | beats | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | popular culture | popular culture | urban | urban | authenticity | authenticity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.961 Seminar on Deep Engagement (MIT) MAS.961 Seminar on Deep Engagement (MIT)

Description

Innovation in expression, as realized in media, tangible objects, performance and more,  generates new questions and new potentials for human engagement. When and how does expression engage us deeply? Many personal stories confirm the hypothesis that once we experience deep engagement, it is a state we long for, remember, and want to repeat. This class will explore what underlying principles and innovative methods can ensure the development of higher-quality "deep engagement" products (artifacts, experiences, environments, performances, etc.) that appeal to a broad audience and that have lasting value over the long term. Innovation in expression, as realized in media, tangible objects, performance and more,  generates new questions and new potentials for human engagement. When and how does expression engage us deeply? Many personal stories confirm the hypothesis that once we experience deep engagement, it is a state we long for, remember, and want to repeat. This class will explore what underlying principles and innovative methods can ensure the development of higher-quality "deep engagement" products (artifacts, experiences, environments, performances, etc.) that appeal to a broad audience and that have lasting value over the long term.

Subjects

deep engagement | deep engagement | human psyche | human psyche | media | media | television | television | photography | photography | art | art | advertising | advertising | film | film | popular culture | popular culture | machine models | machine models | human bonding | human bonding | audience | audience | viewer / viewed | viewer / viewed | interactive spaces | interactive spaces | visceral reactions | visceral reactions | interactive learning | interactive learning | participatory conditions | participatory conditions | physiology | physiology | psychology | psychology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | engineering | engineering | hobbyist | hobbyist | communications | communications | Internet | Internet | machine age | machine age | Apollo program | Apollo program | biotechnology | biotechnology | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT) 21H.206 American Consumer Culture (MIT)

Description

This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance. This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Subjects

twentieth century history | twentieth century history | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | united states | united states | marketing | marketing | mass-production | mass-production | consumption | consumption | economics | economics | politics | politics | middle class | middle class | advertising | advertising | status | status | American Dream | American Dream | mass-market | mass-market | suburbs | suburbs | e-commerce | e-commerce | fast food | fast food

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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American Society (MIT) American Society (MIT)

Description

Writing in the wake of the Civil War, poet Walt Whitman insisted that "the real war will never get in the books." Throughout American history, the experience of war has fundamentally shaped the ways that Americans think about themselves, their fellow Americans, and the meanings of national citizenship. War has also posed challenges of representation, both for those who fought as well as those who did not. This subject examines how Americans have told the stories of modern war in history, literature, and popular culture, and interprets them in terms of changing ideas about American national identity. Writing in the wake of the Civil War, poet Walt Whitman insisted that "the real war will never get in the books." Throughout American history, the experience of war has fundamentally shaped the ways that Americans think about themselves, their fellow Americans, and the meanings of national citizenship. War has also posed challenges of representation, both for those who fought as well as those who did not. This subject examines how Americans have told the stories of modern war in history, literature, and popular culture, and interprets them in terms of changing ideas about American national identity.

Subjects

Civil War | Civil War | war | war | citizenship | citizenship | representation | representation | history | history | popular culture | popular culture | literature | literature | national identity | national identity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Smallpox in poetry

Description

Smallpox was rife in the eighteenth century, leaving its mark both on its sufferers, and on the literature of the period. This podcast explores its history in verse. Smallpox was common during the eighteenth-century, and its aftereffects much discussed and lamented in popular literature. This podcast explores its representation in eighteenth-century verse. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

popular culture | eighteenth-century | #greatwriters | disease | smallpox | popular culture | eighteenth-century | #greatwriters | disease | smallpox

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Ladle: a comic poem

Description

Matthew Prior's The Ladle was one of the most popular poems of the eighteenth century. This podcast explores its appeal. Matthew Prior's The Ladle was hugely popular in the eighteenth century. Based on a story from Ovid, its bawdy tale delighted generations of readers. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Ovid | eighteenth century | popular culture | #greatwriters | poetry | Ovid | eighteenth century | popular culture | #greatwriters | poetry

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Politics in poetry

Description

This podcast explores the culture of Jacobitism in the eighteenth century, using a popular ballad. The culture of Jacobite politics took many forms in the eighteenth century. This podcast explores its expression in popular song. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Jacobitism | popular culture | eighteenth century politics | ballads | #greatwriters | Jacobitism | popular culture | eighteenth century politics | ballads | #greatwriters

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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WGS.640 Screen Women: Body Narratives in Popular American Film (MIT) WGS.640 Screen Women: Body Narratives in Popular American Film (MIT)

Description

Using film and related popular media as our texts, this course will examine how screen "embodiments" of the woman visualize ideologies of discipline and desire in a culture in which her body has become a representation of the ability to control appetites, size and shape while investing personal and social capital in its rehabilitation as a project of endless reconstruction, redesign and maintenance. Throughout the course we will draw from feminist film theory, clinical psychology, as well as women's, gender, and cultural studies, to better understand how filmic representations of the woman's body first emerge from contemporary psychosocial contexts and then in turn shape the body ideals and internalizations, as well as the behavioral practices of the film spectator. The Graduat Using film and related popular media as our texts, this course will examine how screen "embodiments" of the woman visualize ideologies of discipline and desire in a culture in which her body has become a representation of the ability to control appetites, size and shape while investing personal and social capital in its rehabilitation as a project of endless reconstruction, redesign and maintenance. Throughout the course we will draw from feminist film theory, clinical psychology, as well as women's, gender, and cultural studies, to better understand how filmic representations of the woman's body first emerge from contemporary psychosocial contexts and then in turn shape the body ideals and internalizations, as well as the behavioral practices of the film spectator. The Graduat

Subjects

film | film | American film | American film | women | women | gender | gender | popular culture | popular culture | feminism | feminism | film theory | film theory | politics | politics | body | body | sexuality | sexuality

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.876 History of Media and Technology: Sound, the Minority Report -- Radical Music of the Past 100 Years (MIT) CMS.876 History of Media and Technology: Sound, the Minority Report -- Radical Music of the Past 100 Years (MIT)

Description

This course looks at the history of avant-garde and electronic music from the early twentieth century to the present. The class is organized as a theory and production seminar for which students may either produce audio/multimedia projects or a research paper. It engages music scholarship, cultural criticism, studio production, and multi-media development, such as recent software, sound design for film and games, and sound installation. Sound as a media tool for communication and sound as a form of artistic expression are subjects under discussion. The artists' work reviewed in the course includes selections from audio innovators such as the Italian Futurists, Edgard Varèse, John Cage, King Tubby, Brian Eno, Steve Reich, Afrika Bambaataa, Kraftwerk, Merzbow, Aphex Twin, Rza, Björk, and This course looks at the history of avant-garde and electronic music from the early twentieth century to the present. The class is organized as a theory and production seminar for which students may either produce audio/multimedia projects or a research paper. It engages music scholarship, cultural criticism, studio production, and multi-media development, such as recent software, sound design for film and games, and sound installation. Sound as a media tool for communication and sound as a form of artistic expression are subjects under discussion. The artists' work reviewed in the course includes selections from audio innovators such as the Italian Futurists, Edgard Varèse, John Cage, King Tubby, Brian Eno, Steve Reich, Afrika Bambaataa, Kraftwerk, Merzbow, Aphex Twin, Rza, Björk, and

Subjects

popular culture | popular culture | contemporary music | contemporary music | rock | rock | rap | rap | electronic music | electronic music | electronica | electronica | sampling | sampling | noise | noise | audio | audio | avant-garde | avant-garde | music criticism | music criticism | studio production | studio production | podcast | podcast | mashup | mashup | collage | collage | tape loop | tape loop | DJ | DJ | synthesizer | synthesizer | music synthesis | music synthesis | drum machine | drum machine | music concrete | music concrete

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.011 Topics in Indian Popular Culture: Spectacle, Masala, and Genre (MIT) 21G.011 Topics in Indian Popular Culture: Spectacle, Masala, and Genre (MIT)

Description

This course aims to provide an overview of Indian popular culture over the last two decades, through a variety of material such as popular fiction, music, television and Bombay cinema. The class will explore major themes and their representations in relation to current social and political issues. In particular, students will examine the elements of the formulaic "masala movie", music and melodrama, the ideas of nostalgia and incumbent change in youth culture, as well as shifting questions of gender and sexuality in popular fiction. During the course, students will look at some journalistic writing, advertising clips and political cartoons to understand the relation between the popular culture and the social imagery of a nation. This course is taught in English. This course aims to provide an overview of Indian popular culture over the last two decades, through a variety of material such as popular fiction, music, television and Bombay cinema. The class will explore major themes and their representations in relation to current social and political issues. In particular, students will examine the elements of the formulaic "masala movie", music and melodrama, the ideas of nostalgia and incumbent change in youth culture, as well as shifting questions of gender and sexuality in popular fiction. During the course, students will look at some journalistic writing, advertising clips and political cartoons to understand the relation between the popular culture and the social imagery of a nation. This course is taught in English.

Subjects

Inidian popular culture | Inidian popular culture | youth culture | youth culture | Bollywood | Bollywood | Hindi cinema | Hindi cinema | masala melodramatic films | masala melodramatic films | Dil Chahta Hai | Dil Chahta Hai | Parineeta | Parineeta | Rang De Basanti | Rang De Basanti | Corporate | Corporate | Krish and Omkara | Krish and Omkara | Shobha De | Shobha De | Khushwant Singh | Khushwant Singh

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.039 Japanese Popular Culture (MIT) 21G.039 Japanese Popular Culture (MIT)

Description

This course examines Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities and culture. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music in Japan, anime (Japanese animated films) and feature films, sports (sumo, soccer, baseball), and online communication. Emphasis will be on contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power in global culture industries. This course examines Japanese popular culture as a way of understanding the changing character of media, capitalism, fan communities and culture. Topics include manga (comic books), hip-hop and other popular music in Japan, anime (Japanese animated films) and feature films, sports (sumo, soccer, baseball), and online communication. Emphasis will be on contemporary popular culture and theories of gender, sexuality, race, and the workings of power in global culture industries.

Subjects

japan | japan | popular culture | popular culture | media | media | capitalism | capitalism | comics | comics | hip-hop | hip-hop | music | music | animation | animation | movie | movie | sports | sports | sexuality | sexuality | race | race | gender | gender | fan communities | fan communities | culture | culture | manga | manga | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | anime | anime | Japanese animated films | Japanese animated films | power | power | global culture industries | global culture industries | 21F.039 | 21F.039 | 21F.037 | 21F.037

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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