Searching for postmodernism : 23 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1

4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT) 4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and so-called "primitive" art. This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and so-called "primitive" art.

Subjects

modern art; high art; mass culture; modernist aesthetic; modernism; 19th Century Art; 20th Century Art; modernization; urbanization; globalization; photography; cinema; painting; sculpture; postmodernism; visual arts; multimedia; pop art; popular culture | modern art; high art; mass culture; modernist aesthetic; modernism; 19th Century Art; 20th Century Art; modernization; urbanization; globalization; photography; cinema; painting; sculpture; postmodernism; visual arts; multimedia; pop art; popular culture | modern art | modern art | high art | high art | mass culture | mass culture | modernist aesthetic | modernist aesthetic | modernism | modernism | 19th Century Art | 19th Century Art | 20th Century Art | 20th Century Art | modernization | modernization | urbanization | urbanization | globalization | globalization | photography | photography | cinema | cinema | painting | painting | sculpture | sculpture | postmodernism | postmodernism | visual arts | visual arts | multimedia | multimedia | pop art | pop art | popular culture | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches. We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | women's studies | women's studies | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT) 4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, prints, performance and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and "primitive" art. This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, prints, performance and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and "primitive" art.

Subjects

modern art | modern art | high art | high art | mass culture | mass culture | modernist aesthetic | modernist aesthetic | modernism | modernism | 19th Century Art | 19th Century Art | 20th Century Art | 20th Century Art | modernization | modernization | urbanization | urbanization | globalization | globalization | photography | photography | cinema | cinema | painting | painting | sculpture | sculpture | postmodernism | postmodernism | visual arts | visual arts | multimedia | multimedia | pop art | pop art | popular culture | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history. This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework | agrarian history | agrarian history | historical demography | historical demography | European history | European history | American history | American history | Asian history | Asian history | maps | maps | African history | African history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Literature and Urban Experience (MIT) 21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Literature and Urban Experience (MIT)

Description

Alienation, overcrowding, sensory overload, homelessness, criminality, violence, loneliness, sprawl, blight. How have the realities of city living influenced literature's formal and thematic techniques? How useful is it to think of literature as its own kind of "map" of urban space? Are cities too grand, heterogeneous, and shifting to be captured by writers? In this seminar we will seek answers to these questions in key city literature, and in theoretical works that endeavor to understand the culture of cities. Alienation, overcrowding, sensory overload, homelessness, criminality, violence, loneliness, sprawl, blight. How have the realities of city living influenced literature's formal and thematic techniques? How useful is it to think of literature as its own kind of "map" of urban space? Are cities too grand, heterogeneous, and shifting to be captured by writers? In this seminar we will seek answers to these questions in key city literature, and in theoretical works that endeavor to understand the culture of cities.

Subjects

urban | urban | literature | literature | urban experience | urban experience | city | city | The Waste Land | The Waste Land | Mrs. Dalloway | Mrs. Dalloway | Belfast Confetti | Belfast Confetti | Ripley Bogle | Ripley Bogle | The Lonely Londoners | The Lonely Londoners | modernity | modernity | modern | modern | modernism | modernism | metropolis | metropolis | postmodernism | postmodernism | the gunny sack | the gunny sack

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Lecture 27: Games as Art Lecture 27: Games as Art

Description

Description: Games have emerged in recent decades as a rich artistic medium, combining elements from audiovisual, interactive, and performance art traditions. Abe Stein talks about aesthetics and meaning in games, and their relation to various modern art movements. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Abe Stein (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: aesthetics, postmodernism, social commentary, abstraction, performance art, Yoko Ono, simulation, Fluxus, event score, interactive art, fine art, representation, virtual economy, satire, geocaching, alternative reality games, art games, pop culture, video gamesTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Games have emerged in recent decades as a rich artistic medium, combining elements from audiovisual, interactive, and performance art traditions. Abe Stein talks about aesthetics and meaning in games, and their relation to various modern art movements. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Abe Stein (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: aesthetics, postmodernism, social commentary, abstraction, performance art, Yoko Ono, simulation, Fluxus, event score, interactive art, fine art, representation, virtual economy, satire, geocaching, alternative reality games, art games, pop culture, video gamesTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

aesthetics | aesthetics | postmodernism | postmodernism | social commentary | social commentary | abstraction | abstraction | performance art | performance art | Yoko Ono | Yoko Ono | simulation | simulation | Fluxus | Fluxus | event score | event score | interactive art | interactive art | fine art | fine art | representation | representation | virtual economy | virtual economy | satire | satire | geocaching | geocaching | alternative reality games | alternative reality games | art games | art games | pop culture | pop culture | video games | video games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies/cms-608-game-design-fall-2010/audio-lectures/rss.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Energy resources: Nuclear energy Energy resources: Nuclear energy

Description

The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. Energy resources: Nuclear energy is a free course that considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Nuclear energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The transformation of radioactive uranium and, in some instances, thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source, except nuclear fusion, and therein lies its greatest attraction. Energy resources: Nuclear energy is a free course that considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Energy resources: Nuclear energy. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | passenger cars | passenger cars | CO2 | CO2 | law | law | food technology | food technology | flavour | flavour | scandals | scandals | gothic revival | gothic revival | industrial design | industrial design | postmodernism | postmodernism | overcrowding | overcrowding | infinities | infinities | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | emergency communications | emergency communications

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/rss/try-content

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and so-called "primitive" art.

Subjects

modern art; high art; mass culture; modernist aesthetic; modernism; 19th Century Art; 20th Century Art; modernization; urbanization; globalization; photography; cinema; painting; sculpture; postmodernism; visual arts; multimedia; pop art; popular culture | modern art | high art | mass culture | modernist aesthetic | modernism | 19th Century Art | 20th Century Art | modernization | urbanization | globalization | photography | cinema | painting | sculpture | postmodernism | visual arts | multimedia | pop art | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Festivals and Identity

Description

Discusses the question of why the presentation of identity so important in modern life and what has it to do with festivals.

Subjects

Festivals Religion Culture U73621 ritual religion identity postmodernism Heelas

License

Copyright Oxford Brookes University, all rights reserved Copyright Oxford Brookes University, all rights reserved

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Lecture 27: Games as Art

Description

Description: Games have emerged in recent decades as a rich artistic medium, combining elements from audiovisual, interactive, and performance art traditions. Abe Stein talks about aesthetics and meaning in games, and their relation to various modern art movements. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Abe Stein (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: aesthetics, postmodernism, social commentary, abstraction, performance art, Yoko Ono, simulation, Fluxus, event score, interactive art, fine art, representation, virtual economy, satire, geocaching, alternative reality games, art games, pop culture, video gamesTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

aesthetics | postmodernism | social commentary | abstraction | performance art | Yoko Ono | simulation | Fluxus | event score | interactive art | fine art | representation | virtual economy | satire | geocaching | alternative reality games | art games | pop culture | video games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies-writing/cms-608-game-design-fall-2010/audio-lectures/rss.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine objects of visual art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, prints, performance and video. These objects will be viewed in their interaction with advertising, caricature, comics, graffiti, television, fashion, folk art, and "primitive" art.

Subjects

modern art | high art | mass culture | modernist aesthetic | modernism | 19th Century Art | 20th Century Art | modernization | urbanization | globalization | photography | cinema | painting | sculpture | postmodernism | visual arts | multimedia | pop art | popular culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Cultural and Literary Expression in Modernity

Description

This course seeks to develop a nuanced understanding of the scope of cultural and literary expression in the late 19th and the first half of the 20th centuries. It attends to broad socio-historical happenings, from the birth of modernism in the late 19th century to the post-modern moment. In addition to literary “modernism,” the course will also take a brief look at the cultural production of “modernism” in art, music, architecture, cinema, philosophy, and drama. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (English Literature 204)

Subjects

aestheticism | symbolism | experimental poetics | imagism | vorticism | futurism | dadaism | marxism | fascism | surrealism | narrative | epistemology | postmodernism | relativism | related subjects | R000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Energy resources: Nuclear energy

Description

The transformation of radioactive uranium and in some instances thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source except nuclear fusion and therein lies its greatest attraction. Energy resources: Nuclear energy is a free course that considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises.

Subjects

Environmental Studies | passenger cars | CO2 | law | food technology | flavour | scandals | gothic revival | industrial design | postmodernism | overcrowding | infinities | quantum mechanics | emergency communications

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/feeds/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Archives 2.0. If We Build It, Will They Come?

Description

Presentation on the implications of web 2.0 technologies for archivists which argues that '2.0' is parter of a broader postmodern paradigm shift for the archives professiona.

Subjects

web 2.0 | social media | archives | postmodernism | INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY and INFORMATION | C

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Literature and Urban Experience (MIT)

Description

Alienation, overcrowding, sensory overload, homelessness, criminality, violence, loneliness, sprawl, blight. How have the realities of city living influenced literature's formal and thematic techniques? How useful is it to think of literature as its own kind of "map" of urban space? Are cities too grand, heterogeneous, and shifting to be captured by writers? In this seminar we will seek answers to these questions in key city literature, and in theoretical works that endeavor to understand the culture of cities.

Subjects

urban | literature | urban experience | city | The Waste Land | Mrs. Dalloway | Belfast Confetti | Ripley Bogle | The Lonely Londoners | modernity | modern | modernism | metropolis | postmodernism | the gunny sack

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Timeline of key thinkers (philosophers)

Description

The resource is a Flash object depicting a timeline of key philosophers and main theories from 1850 onwards.

Subjects

philosophers | timelines | feminism | interprative theory | postmodernism | neo-marxism | functionalism | comte | auguste | marx | karl | durkheim | emile | HUMANITIES (HISTORY / ARCHAEOLOGY / RELIGIOUS STUDIES / PHILOSOPHY) | Historical and Philosophical studies | Learning | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL06 = SCQF 6 | Advanced courses | NICAT 3 | CQFW 3 | Advanced | A/AS Level | NVQ 3 | Higher | SVQ 3 | UK EL07 = SCQF 7 | Higher Certificate | NICAT 4 | CQFW 4 | NVQ 4 | Advanced Higher | SVQ 4 | HN Certificate | UK EL08 = SCQF 8 | Higher Diploma | NICAT 5 | CQFW 5 | HN Diploma | Diploma in HE | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | philosophical studies | V000 | D

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Lecture 27: Games as Art

Description

Description: Games have emerged in recent decades as a rich artistic medium, combining elements from audiovisual, interactive, and performance art traditions. Abe Stein talks about aesthetics and meaning in games, and their relation to various modern art movements. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Abe Stein (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: aesthetics, postmodernism, social commentary, abstraction, performance art, Yoko Ono, simulation, Fluxus, event score, interactive art, fine art, representation, virtual economy, satire, geocaching, alternative reality games, art games, pop culture, video gamesTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

aesthetics | postmodernism | social commentary | abstraction | performance art | Yoko Ono | simulation | Fluxus | event score | interactive art | fine art | representation | virtual economy | satire | geocaching | alternative reality games | art games | pop culture | video games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies/cms-608-game-design-fall-2010/audio-lectures/rss.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Introduction to Music

Description

This course provides an introductory survey of the Western classical tradition, exploring music as a phenomenon of both sound and culture. The focus of this course is the development of aural skills that lead to an understanding and appreciation of music; making use of live performances and streaming audio available on the Internet, the student will listen to and explore some of the most important and influential repertoires and genres of music that emerged in the last four centuries. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Music 101)

Subjects

music | listen | rhythm | melody | harmony | instrument | genre | theme | variation | style | medieval | renaissance | baroque | bach | handel | classical | mozart | enlightenment | romanticism | impressionism | exoticism | modernism | mahler | stravinksy | copland | ives | postmodernism | design | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Energy resources: Nuclear energy

Description

The transformation of radioactive uranium and in some instances thorium isotopes provides vastly more energy per unit mass of fuel than any other energy source except nuclear fusion and therein lies its greatest attraction. Energy resources: Nuclear energy is a free course that considers the advantages and limitations of generating this power and the environmental and security issues that the process raises.

Subjects

Environmental Science | passenger cars | CO2 | law | food technology | flavour | scandals | gothic revival | industrial design | postmodernism | overcrowding | infinities | quantum mechanics | emergency communications

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

Site sourced from

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/feeds/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Twentieth Century Art

Description

This course explores the history of cultural and artistic developments of the twentieth century in the Western world (Europe and the United States). The student will concentrate on major styles in painting and sculpture, including Cubism, Fauvism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dada, Surrealism, Pop Art, and Op-Art, as well as on Modernism and Post-Modernism in architecture, learning about the aesthetic ideals, systems of belief, as well as political, religious, and social conditions that these styles reflect. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Art History 209)

Subjects

twentieth century | art | modernism | impressionism | art nouveau | avant-garde | fauvism | matisse | expressionism | cubism | futurism | abstraction | suprematism | constructivism | surrealism | photorealism | postmodernism | design | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Contemporary Art

Description

“Contemporary art” denotes a specific period of art starting in the 1960s that is characterized by a break from the modernist artistic canon and a desire to move away from the dominant Western cultural model, looking for inspiration in everyday and popular culture. This course focuses on Western art and culture, yet also explores a selection of contemporary art around the globe. The student will examine a variety of specific aesthetic and social issues and look at the different strategies contemporary artists proposed and used in their work. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Art History 408)

Subjects

art | contemporary art | modernism | feminism | performance art | postmodernism | situationist | fluxus | dematerialization | public | identity | design | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history.

Subjects

primary sources | gender history | Industrial Revolution | media studies | visual culture | environmental history | postmodernism | microhistory | digital humanities | national history | borders | frontier | global history | imperialism | historiography | analytical framework | agrarian history | historical demography | European history | American history | Asian history | maps | African history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches.

Subjects

primary sources | women's studies | gender history | Industrial Revolution | media studies | visual culture | environmental history | postmodernism | microhistory | digital humanities | national history | borders | frontier | global history | imperialism | historiography | analytical framework

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata