Searching for practice : 577 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

4.302 BSAD Foundations in the Visual Arts (MIT) 4.302 BSAD Foundations in the Visual Arts (MIT)

Description

This class offers a foundation in the visual art practice and its critical analysis for beginning architecture students. Emphasis is on long-range artistic development and its analogies to architectural thinking and practice. Students will learn to communicate ideas and experiences through various two-dimensional, and three-dimensional, and time-based media, including installations, performance and video. Lectures, visiting artist presentations, field trips, and readings supplement studio practice. This class offers a foundation in the visual art practice and its critical analysis for beginning architecture students. Emphasis is on long-range artistic development and its analogies to architectural thinking and practice. Students will learn to communicate ideas and experiences through various two-dimensional, and three-dimensional, and time-based media, including installations, performance and video. Lectures, visiting artist presentations, field trips, and readings supplement studio practice.

Subjects

visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | architecture | architecture | architectural practice | architectural practice | two-dimensional media | two-dimensional media | three-dimensional media | three-dimensional media | 2D media | 2D media | 3D media | 3D media | sculpture | sculpture | performance | performance | video | video

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.965 Reflective Practice: An Approach for Expanding Your Learning Frontiers (MIT) 11.965 Reflective Practice: An Approach for Expanding Your Learning Frontiers (MIT)

Description

The course is an introduction to the approach of Reflective Practice developed by Donald Schön. It is an approach that enables professionals to understand how they use their knowledge in practical situations and how they can combine practice and learning in a more effective way. Through greater awareness of how they deploy their knowledge in practical situations, professionals can increase their capacities of learning in a more timely way. Understanding how they frame situations and ideas helps professionals to achieve greater flexibility and increase their capacity of conceptual innovation. The objective of the course is to introduce students to the approach and methods of reflective practice by raising their awareness about their own cognitive resources and how they use them in thei The course is an introduction to the approach of Reflective Practice developed by Donald Schön. It is an approach that enables professionals to understand how they use their knowledge in practical situations and how they can combine practice and learning in a more effective way. Through greater awareness of how they deploy their knowledge in practical situations, professionals can increase their capacities of learning in a more timely way. Understanding how they frame situations and ideas helps professionals to achieve greater flexibility and increase their capacity of conceptual innovation. The objective of the course is to introduce students to the approach and methods of reflective practice by raising their awareness about their own cognitive resources and how they use them in thei

Subjects

reflective practice | Donald Schon | Chris Argyris | conceptual innovation | knowledge generation | espoused theory | theory in use | reflection | tacit knowledge | explicit knowledge | learning cycles | reframing | conceptual frameworks | critical moments | experimentation | speculation | modeling | dialogue | theories | action | thinking | virtual worlds | mental model | framing | justice | equality | power | assumptions | intractable controversies | reflective practice | Donald Schon | Chris Argyris | conceptual innovation | knowledge generation | espoused theory | theory in use | reflection | tacit knowledge | explicit knowledge | learning cycles | reframing | conceptual frameworks | critical moments | experimentation | speculation | modeling | dialogue | theories | action | thinking | virtual worlds | mental model | framing | justice | equality | power | assumptions | intractable controversies | diagrams | diagrams | reflective practice | reflective practice | Donald Schon | Donald Schon | practice | practice | learning | learning | conceptual innovation | conceptual innovation | cognitive resources | cognitive resources | socialization | socialization | externalization | externalization | combination | combination | internalization | internalization | SECI Cycle of Knowledge | SECI Cycle of Knowledge

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Thinking about dyslexia Thinking about dyslexia

Description

The site was funded by HEFCE Disability funding and also by contributions from PESL The site was funded by HEFCE Disability funding and also by contributions from PESL These documents are part of the Thinking about Dyslexia website which was produced by Academic Support. The website is intended to support our staff by providing a resource about dyslexia and by highlighting the good practice amongst teaching staff which our students have found helpful. One of our aims is to demonstrate that some elements of what is good practice for all work extremely well for dyslexic students and therefore staff designing teaching programmes do not necessarily have to do anything extra for dyslexic students. We have tried to produce something which would provide information and insight into dyslexia and how it can affect students and their learning rather than just a list of dos and don’ts. The site was funded by HEFCE Disability funding and also by contributions fr These documents are part of the Thinking about Dyslexia website which was produced by Academic Support. The website is intended to support our staff by providing a resource about dyslexia and by highlighting the good practice amongst teaching staff which our students have found helpful. One of our aims is to demonstrate that some elements of what is good practice for all work extremely well for dyslexic students and therefore staff designing teaching programmes do not necessarily have to do anything extra for dyslexic students. We have tried to produce something which would provide information and insight into dyslexia and how it can affect students and their learning rather than just a list of dos and don’ts. The site was funded by HEFCE Disability funding and also by contributions fr

Subjects

UNow | UNow | dyslexia | dyslexia | PESL | PESL | develop practice | develop practice | HEFCE Disability Funding | HEFCE Disability Funding | good practice | good practice | best practice | best practice | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

Site sourced from

http://unow.nottingham.ac.uk/rss.ashx

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.301 Introduction to the Visual Arts (MIT) 4.301 Introduction to the Visual Arts (MIT)

Description

This class will introduce students to a variety of contemporary art practices and ideas. The class will begin with a brief overview of 'visual language' by looking at a variety of artworks and discussing basic concepts revolving around artistic practice. The rest of the class will focus on notions of the real/unreal as explored with various mediums and practices. The class will work in video, sculpture and in public space. This class will introduce students to a variety of contemporary art practices and ideas. The class will begin with a brief overview of 'visual language' by looking at a variety of artworks and discussing basic concepts revolving around artistic practice. The rest of the class will focus on notions of the real/unreal as explored with various mediums and practices. The class will work in video, sculpture and in public space.

Subjects

visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.301 Introduction to the Visual Arts (MIT) 4.301 Introduction to the Visual Arts (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to artistic practice and aesthetic analysis through studio work and lectures. Students communicate ideas and experiences through various media such as sculpture, installation, performance, and video. Projects evolve through stages of conceptual and material development to final presentation. Lectures, visiting artist presentations, field trips, and readings supplement studio practice, providing an index to the historical, cultural, and environmental forces that affect both development of artistic vision and reception of works of art.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm. This course is an introduction to artistic practice and aesthetic analysis through studio work and lectures. Students communicate ideas and experiences through various media such as sculpture, installation, performance, and video. Projects evolve through stages of conceptual and material development to final presentation. Lectures, visiting artist presentations, field trips, and readings supplement studio practice, providing an index to the historical, cultural, and environmental forces that affect both development of artistic vision and reception of works of art.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm.

Subjects

visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.301 Introduction to the Visual Arts (MIT) 4.301 Introduction to the Visual Arts (MIT)

Description

Introduction to artistic practice and aesthetic analysis through studio work and lectures. Students communicate ideas and experiences through various media such as sculpture, installation, performance, and video. Projects evolve through stages of conceptual and material development to final presentation. Lectures, visiting artist presentations, field trips, and readings supplement studio practice, providing an index to the historical, cultural, and environmental forces that affect both development of artistic vision and reception of works of art.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software  is required to run the .rm files found on this course site. Introduction to artistic practice and aesthetic analysis through studio work and lectures. Students communicate ideas and experiences through various media such as sculpture, installation, performance, and video. Projects evolve through stages of conceptual and material development to final presentation. Lectures, visiting artist presentations, field trips, and readings supplement studio practice, providing an index to the historical, cultural, and environmental forces that affect both development of artistic vision and reception of works of art.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software  is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.

Subjects

visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range | long-range | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.303 The Production of Space: Art, Architecture and Urbanism in Dialogue (MIT) 4.303 The Production of Space: Art, Architecture and Urbanism in Dialogue (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This seminar engages in the notion of space from various points of departure. The goal is first of all to engage in the term and secondly to examine possibilities of art, architecture within urban settings in order to produce what is your interpretation of space. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This seminar engages in the notion of space from various points of departure. The goal is first of all to engage in the term and secondly to examine possibilities of art, architecture within urban settings in order to produce what is your interpretation of space.

Subjects

architecture | architecture | urbanisml gender | urbanisml gender | space | space | visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT) 4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.370 Interrogative Design Workshop (MIT) 4.370 Interrogative Design Workshop (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. "Parrhesia" was an Athenian right to frank and open speaking, the right that, like the First Amendment, demands a "fearless speaker" who must challenge political powers with criticism and unsolicited advice. Can designer and artist respond today to such a democratic call and demand? Is it possible to do so despite the (increasing) restrictions imposed on our liberties today? Can the designer or public artist operate as a proactive "parrhesiatic" agent and contribute to the protection, development and dissemination of "fearless speaking" in Public Space? Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. "Parrhesia" was an Athenian right to frank and open speaking, the right that, like the First Amendment, demands a "fearless speaker" who must challenge political powers with criticism and unsolicited advice. Can designer and artist respond today to such a democratic call and demand? Is it possible to do so despite the (increasing) restrictions imposed on our liberties today? Can the designer or public artist operate as a proactive "parrhesiatic" agent and contribute to the protection, development and dissemination of "fearless speaking" in Public Space?

Subjects

visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

1.782 Environmental Engineering Masters of Engineering Project (MIT) 1.782 Environmental Engineering Masters of Engineering Project (MIT)

Description

This class is one of the core requirements for the Environmental Masters of Engineering program. It is designed to teach about environmental engineering through the use of case studies, computer software tools, and seminars from industrial experts. Case studies provide the basis for group projects as well as individual theses. Past case studies have included the MMR Superfund site on Cape Cod; restoration of the Florida Everglades; dredging of Boston Harbor; local watershed trading programs; appropriate wastewater treatment technology for Brazil; point-of-use water treatment for Nepal, Brownfields Development in Providence, RI, and water resource planning for the island of Cyprus. This class spans the entire academic year: students must register for the Fall term, IAP, and the Spring term. This class is one of the core requirements for the Environmental Masters of Engineering program. It is designed to teach about environmental engineering through the use of case studies, computer software tools, and seminars from industrial experts. Case studies provide the basis for group projects as well as individual theses. Past case studies have included the MMR Superfund site on Cape Cod; restoration of the Florida Everglades; dredging of Boston Harbor; local watershed trading programs; appropriate wastewater treatment technology for Brazil; point-of-use water treatment for Nepal, Brownfields Development in Providence, RI, and water resource planning for the island of Cyprus. This class spans the entire academic year: students must register for the Fall term, IAP, and the Spring term.

Subjects

civil engineering; environmental engineering; professional practice; methodology; thesis; proposal; yonder; geotechnical data; water treatment; aquifer; groundwater; hydrology; Chattahoochee; Tennessee; US Virgin Islands; pollution; contaminants; drinking water | civil engineering; environmental engineering; professional practice; methodology; thesis; proposal; yonder; geotechnical data; water treatment; aquifer; groundwater; hydrology; Chattahoochee; Tennessee; US Virgin Islands; pollution; contaminants; drinking water | civil engineering | civil engineering | environmental engineering | environmental engineering | professional practice | professional practice | methodology | methodology | thesis | thesis | proposal | proposal | yonder | yonder | geotechnical data | geotechnical data | water treatment | water treatment | aquifer | aquifer | groundwater | groundwater | hydrology | hydrology | Chattahoochee | Chattahoochee | Tennessee | Tennessee | US Virgin Islands | US Virgin Islands | pollution | pollution | contaminants | contaminants | drinking water | drinking water

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

1.012 Introduction to Civil Engineering Design (MIT) 1.012 Introduction to Civil Engineering Design (MIT)

Description

1.012 introduces students to the theory, tools, and techniques of engineering design and creative problem-solving, as well as design issues and practices in civil engineering. The course includes several design cases, with an emphasis on built facilities (e.g., buildings, bridges and roads). Project design explicitly concerns technical approaches as well as consideration of the existing built environment, natural environment, economic and social factors, and expected life span. A large design case is introduced, which is used in the subsequent specialty area design subjects (1.031, 1.041, 1.051) and the capstone design subject (1.013). 1.012 introduces students to the theory, tools, and techniques of engineering design and creative problem-solving, as well as design issues and practices in civil engineering. The course includes several design cases, with an emphasis on built facilities (e.g., buildings, bridges and roads). Project design explicitly concerns technical approaches as well as consideration of the existing built environment, natural environment, economic and social factors, and expected life span. A large design case is introduced, which is used in the subsequent specialty area design subjects (1.031, 1.041, 1.051) and the capstone design subject (1.013).

Subjects

design theory | design theory | design tools | design tools | design techniques | design techniques | problem-solving | problem-solving | design issues | design issues | practice in civil engineering | practice in civil engineering | built facilities | built facilities | buildings | buildings | bridges | bridges | roads | roads | built environment | built environment | natural environment | natural environment | economic factors | economic factors | social factors | social factors | expected life span | expected life span | civil engineering practice | civil engineering practice | design principles | design principles | design project | design project | CAD | CAD | computer aided design | computer aided design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21M.873 Theater Arts Topics (MIT) 21M.873 Theater Arts Topics (MIT)

Description

Directed practice in acting, directing, or design on a sustained theater piece, either one-act or full length, from pre-rehearsal preparation to workshop production. Directed practice in acting, directing, or design on a sustained theater piece, either one-act or full length, from pre-rehearsal preparation to workshop production.

Subjects

Acting; directing; design; theater; one-act; full length; pre-rehearsal; workshop; production; theater arts; directed practice; stagecraft; Dramashop; rehearsal; Anne Washburn; play; The Internationalist; Sonenberg; auditions; technical. | Acting; directing; design; theater; one-act; full length; pre-rehearsal; workshop; production; theater arts; directed practice; stagecraft; Dramashop; rehearsal; Anne Washburn; play; The Internationalist; Sonenberg; auditions; technical. | Acting; | Acting; | Acting | Acting | directing | directing | design | design | theater | theater | one-act | one-act | full length | full length | pre-rehearsal | pre-rehearsal | workshop | workshop | production | production | theater arts | theater arts | directed practice | directed practice | stagecraft | stagecraft | Dramashop | Dramashop | rehearsal | rehearsal | Anne Washburn | Anne Washburn | play | play | The Internationalist | The Internationalist | Sonenberg | Sonenberg | auditions | auditions | technical | technical

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

DK5704 Reflect on and Develop your Practice - All study sections

Description

This package contains all 14 study sections developed for this unit developed by the BlendEd project. The individual study sections have also been uploaded separately and can be found in the repository by searching on the unit code DK5704. For this unit you need to reflect on, evaluate and take action to enhance your own knowledge and practice.

Subjects

DK57 04 | care | practice | equality | diversity | rights | legislation | social care | social work practice | reflective practice | CPD | personal effectiveness | quality assurance | SAFETY | SCQF Level 7

License

Licensed to colleges in Scotland Licensed to colleges in Scotland http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG COLEG

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

4.302 BSAD Foundations in the Visual Arts (MIT)

Description

This class offers a foundation in the visual art practice and its critical analysis for beginning architecture students. Emphasis is on long-range artistic development and its analogies to architectural thinking and practice. Students will learn to communicate ideas and experiences through various two-dimensional, and three-dimensional, and time-based media, including installations, performance and video. Lectures, visiting artist presentations, field trips, and readings supplement studio practice.

Subjects

visual art practice | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | installations | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | field trips | studio practice | architecture | architectural practice | two-dimensional media | three-dimensional media | 2D media | 3D media | sculpture | performance | video

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.965 Reflective Practice: An Approach for Expanding Your Learning Frontiers (MIT)

Description

The course is an introduction to the approach of Reflective Practice developed by Donald Schön. It is an approach that enables professionals to understand how they use their knowledge in practical situations and how they can combine practice and learning in a more effective way. Through greater awareness of how they deploy their knowledge in practical situations, professionals can increase their capacities of learning in a more timely way. Understanding how they frame situations and ideas helps professionals to achieve greater flexibility and increase their capacity of conceptual innovation. The objective of the course is to introduce students to the approach and methods of reflective practice by raising their awareness about their own cognitive resources and how they use them in thei

Subjects

reflective practice | Donald Schon | Chris Argyris | conceptual innovation | knowledge generation | espoused theory | theory in use | reflection | tacit knowledge | explicit knowledge | learning cycles | reframing | conceptual frameworks | critical moments | experimentation | speculation | modeling | dialogue | theories | action | thinking | virtual worlds | mental model | framing | justice | equality | power | assumptions | intractable controversies | diagrams | reflective practice | Donald Schon | practice | learning | conceptual innovation | cognitive resources | socialization | externalization | combination | internalization | SECI Cycle of Knowledge

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.215 Medical Anthropology: Culture, Society, and Ethics in Disease and Health (MIT) 21A.215 Medical Anthropology: Culture, Society, and Ethics in Disease and Health (MIT)

Description

This course looks at medicine from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the human, as opposed to biological, side of things. Students learn how to analyze various kinds of medical practice as cultural systems. Particular emphasis is placed on Western (bio-) medicine; students examine how biomedicine constructs disease, health, body, and mind, and how it articulates with other institutions, national and international. This course looks at medicine from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the human, as opposed to biological, side of things. Students learn how to analyze various kinds of medical practice as cultural systems. Particular emphasis is placed on Western (bio-) medicine; students examine how biomedicine constructs disease, health, body, and mind, and how it articulates with other institutions, national and international.

Subjects

ethics | ethics | biomedicine | biomedicine | cultural systems | cultural systems | medical practice | medical practice | health | health | disease | disease | mental illness | mental illness | leprosy | leprosy | placebo | placebo | pharmaceuticals | pharmaceuticals | racism | racism | sexism | sexism | medical institutions | medical institutions | chronic illness | chronic illness | reproductive technologies | reproductive technologies | isolation | isolation | international health | international health

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of Feelings (MIT) 9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of Feelings (MIT)

Description

Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting, or as values are to beliefs and practices. This course considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.In this class, diverse aspects of the current scientific paradigm which is based largely on a distrust of emotions is explored as well as other perspectives within a broader human-ecological context. Relevant issues are approached both experientially and theoretically through discussions in class and in study groups, and through field trips and assigned readings. Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting, or as values are to beliefs and practices. This course considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.In this class, diverse aspects of the current scientific paradigm which is based largely on a distrust of emotions is explored as well as other perspectives within a broader human-ecological context. Relevant issues are approached both experientially and theoretically through discussions in class and in study groups, and through field trips and assigned readings.

Subjects

Affect | Affect | cognition | cognition | behavior | behavior | feeling | feeling | thinking | thinking | acting | acting | values | values | beliefs | beliefs | practices | practices | relations | relations | organization | organization | neurobiology | neurobiology | sociocultural | sociocultural | Psychology | Psychology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

In this course we learn social psychology both theoretically and practically. We examine interpersonal and group dynamics, and explore how the thoughts, feelings and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. We experience the social interactions and personal reactions in the real social situations of the class. In this course we learn social psychology both theoretically and practically. We examine interpersonal and group dynamics, and explore how the thoughts, feelings and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. We experience the social interactions and personal reactions in the real social situations of the class.

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | Psychology | Psychology | social psychology | social psychology | ethics | ethics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21A.215 Medical Anthropology (MIT) 21A.215 Medical Anthropology (MIT)

Description

This course looks at medicine from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the human, as opposed to biological, side of things. Students learn how to analyze various kinds of medical practice as cultural systems. Particular emphasis is placed on Western (bio-medicine); students examine how biomedicine constructs disease, health, body, and mind, and how it articulates with other institutions, national and international. This course looks at medicine from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the human, as opposed to biological, side of things. Students learn how to analyze various kinds of medical practice as cultural systems. Particular emphasis is placed on Western (bio-medicine); students examine how biomedicine constructs disease, health, body, and mind, and how it articulates with other institutions, national and international.

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | biomedicine | biomedicine | cultural systems | cultural systems | medical practice | medical practice | culture | culture | health | health | disease | disease

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT) STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This course will study the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. It will not focus on discoveries and their discoverers. Instead, it will examine: What is science? How has science been practiced, and by whom? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science and society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, geology, medicine, psychology, and computer science. This course will study the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. It will not focus on discoveries and their discoverers. Instead, it will examine: What is science? How has science been practiced, and by whom? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science and society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, geology, medicine, psychology, and computer science.

Subjects

Science | Science | technology | technology | society | society | modern | modern | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | present | present | Europe | Europe | United States | United States | practice | practice | discoveries | discoveries | progress | progress | history | history | physics | physics | chemistry | chemistry | biology | biology | geology | geology | medicine | medicine | psychology | psychology | computer science | computer science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.S34 Problem Solving Seminar (MIT) 18.S34 Problem Solving Seminar (MIT)

Description

This course,which is geared toward Freshmen, is an undergraduate seminar on mathematical problem solving. It is intended for students who enjoy solving challenging mathematical problems and who are interested in learning various techniques and background information useful for problem solving. Students in this course are expected to compete in a nationwide mathematics contest for undergraduates. This course,which is geared toward Freshmen, is an undergraduate seminar on mathematical problem solving. It is intended for students who enjoy solving challenging mathematical problems and who are interested in learning various techniques and background information useful for problem solving. Students in this course are expected to compete in a nationwide mathematics contest for undergraduates.

Subjects

Pigeonhole Principle | Pigeonhole Principle | probability | probability | congruences and divisibility | congruences and divisibility | recurrences | recurrences | limits | limits | greatest integer function | greatest integer function | inequalities | inequalities | Putnam practice | Putnam practice | hidden independence | hidden independence | roots of polynomials | roots of polynomials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | mysogyny | mysogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | musical | musical | corporeal | corporeal | visual | visual | spoken word | spoken word | literary | literary | American cultural imagery | American cultural imagery | African American | African American | cultural practices | cultural practices | material culture | material culture | performance studio | performance studio | hip hop style | hip hop style | rapping | rapping | break | break | breaking | breaking | beats | beats | dj | dj | dee jay | dee jay | turntables | turntables | mic | mic | mc | mc | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | sex | sex | feminist | feminist | electronica | electronica | mediated performance | mediated performance | anarchy | anarchy | commodity fetishism | commodity fetishism | globalization | globalization | whiteness | whiteness | realness | realness | journalism | journalism | criticism | criticism | autobiography | autobiography | black | black

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day. Tracing theories of and about gender, sexuality and sexual identity over time, we will examine the genealogy of "queer" as a term that has emerged to trouble and challenge static and essentialized notions of identity. The social, cultural, and political effect of "queer" has been to pose critical challenges to gay/lesbian/straight identities predicated on a sexual binary. Queer studies shifts the focus of inquiry from sexual identities to sexual practices, ma This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day. Tracing theories of and about gender, sexuality and sexual identity over time, we will examine the genealogy of "queer" as a term that has emerged to trouble and challenge static and essentialized notions of identity. The social, cultural, and political effect of "queer" has been to pose critical challenges to gay/lesbian/straight identities predicated on a sexual binary. Queer studies shifts the focus of inquiry from sexual identities to sexual practices, ma

Subjects

women | women | gender studies | gender studies | sexual identity | sexual identity | gender identities | gender identities | gender | gender | queer | queer | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | queer studies | queer studies | gay | gay | lesbian | lesbian | straight identities | straight identities | sexual practices | sexual practices | sexuality | sexuality | freud | freud | foucault | foucault | sedgwick | sedgwick | rubin | rubin | butler | butler | homosexuality | homosexuality | homosexual | homosexual | gay marriage | gay marriage | AIDs | AIDs | feminism | feminism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

18.S34 Problem Solving Seminar (MIT) 18.S34 Problem Solving Seminar (MIT)

Description

This course is an undergraduate seminar on mathematical problem solving. It is intended for students who enjoy solving challenging mathematical problems and who are interested in learning various techniques and background information useful for problem solving. This course is an undergraduate seminar on mathematical problem solving. It is intended for students who enjoy solving challenging mathematical problems and who are interested in learning various techniques and background information useful for problem solving.

Subjects

Pigeonhole Principle | Pigeonhole Principle | probability | probability | congruences and divisibility | congruences and divisibility | recurrences | recurrences | limits | limits | greatest integer function | greatest integer function | inequalities | inequalities | Putnam practice | Putnam practice | hidden independence | hidden independence | roots of polynomials | roots of polynomials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of "Feelings'' (MIT) 9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of "Feelings'' (MIT)

Description

Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting or as values are to beliefs and practices. Subject considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts. Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting or as values are to beliefs and practices. Subject considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.

Subjects

Affect | Affect | cognition | cognition | behavior | behavior | feeling | feeling | thinking | thinking | acting | acting | values | values | beliefs | beliefs | practices | practices | relations | relations | organization | organization | neurobiology | neurobiology | sociocultural | sociocultural | Psychology | Psychology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata