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9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of "Feelings'' (MIT) 9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of "Feelings'' (MIT)

Description

Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting or as values are to beliefs and practices. Subject considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts. Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting or as values are to beliefs and practices. Subject considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.

Subjects

Affect | Affect | cognition | cognition | behavior | behavior | feeling | feeling | thinking | thinking | acting | acting | values | values | beliefs | beliefs | practices | practices | relations | relations | organization | organization | neurobiology | neurobiology | sociocultural | sociocultural | Psychology | Psychology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Toxins and Viruses

Description

This resources looks at the potential risks of food contamination coming from toxins and viruses.

Subjects

Toxins | viruses | fish | shell fish | plant toxins | bacteria | hazards | mould | fungi | parasites | mycotoxin | aflatoxin | Norwalk | hygiene | personal hygiene | safe food handling practices | food handling practices | daily routine | catering | HACCP | basic food hygiene | NVQ Level 2 | oxb:200811:009PJ | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | cc-by | creative commons | UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER.

License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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Toxins and viruses

Description

This resources looks at the potential risks of food contamination coming from toxins and viruses

Subjects

viruses | fish | shell fish | plant toxins | bacteria | hazards | mould | fungi | parasites | mycotoxin | aflatoxin | hygiene | personal hygiene | safe food handling practices | food handling practices | daily routine | catering | basic food hygiene | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | cc-by | creative commons | toxins | norwalk | haccp | nvq level 2 | oxb:200811:009pj | ukoer | hlst | engscoer | oer | ll2012 | london 2012 | olympics | olympic games | paralympics | paralympic games | learning legacies | jisc | hea | oxford brookes university | hlstoer | CATERING / FOOD / LEISURE SERVICES / TOURISM | N

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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SP.322 Prohibition and Permission (MIT) SP.322 Prohibition and Permission (MIT)

Description

Explore where the prohibitions and permissions that occur in every day life come from, why they exist, and what gives them force. For example: food—you are only willing and able to eat a subset of the world's edible substances. Marriage—some marriages are prohibited by law or by custom. This course addresses questions of prohibition and permission using psychological sources and literary works from ancient to modern. Texts include works by Shakespeare, Melville, Mary Rowlandson, and Anita Desai. Students give group and individual oral presentations. Explore where the prohibitions and permissions that occur in every day life come from, why they exist, and what gives them force. For example: food—you are only willing and able to eat a subset of the world's edible substances. Marriage—some marriages are prohibited by law or by custom. This course addresses questions of prohibition and permission using psychological sources and literary works from ancient to modern. Texts include works by Shakespeare, Melville, Mary Rowlandson, and Anita Desai. Students give group and individual oral presentations.

Subjects

eating | eating | disgust | disgust | bible | bible | mary rowlandson | mary rowlandson | shakespeare | shakespeare | twelfth night | twelfth night | melville | melville | typee | typee | kafka | kafka | dietary laws | dietary laws | fasting | fasting | feasting | feasting | gender | gender | family | family | sanction | sanction | permission | permission | culture | culture | food | food | social practices | social practices | metamorphosis | metamorphosis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

Examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs mainly through class discussions and participation in study groups. Regular homework assignments, occasional lectures and demonstrations. Examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs mainly through class discussions and participation in study groups. Regular homework assignments, occasional lectures and demonstrations.

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | Psychology | Psychology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT) 21M.775 Hip Hop (MIT)

Description

This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. This course explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. It traces the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty-five year presence in the American cultural imaginary. It also investigates specific black cultural practices that have given rise to its various idioms. Hip hop has invigorated the academy, inspiring scholarship rooted in black musical and literary traditions. This course assesses these sharp breaks and flamboyant versionings of hip hop that have occurred within the academy.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Hip Hop | Hip Hop | Dance | Dance | Rap | Rap | Black | Black | visual culture | visual culture | Music | Music | African | African | American | American | history | history | literature | literature | sexuality | sexuality | mysogyny | mysogyny | feminism | feminism | performance | performance | electronic music | electronic music | activism | activism | politics | politics | consumerism | consumerism | race | race | artist | artist | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | musical | musical | corporeal | corporeal | visual | visual | spoken word | spoken word | literary | literary | American cultural imagery | American cultural imagery | African American | African American | cultural practices | cultural practices | material culture | material culture | performance studio | performance studio | hip hop style | hip hop style | rapping | rapping | break | break | breaking | breaking | beats | beats | dj | dj | dee jay | dee jay | turntables | turntables | mic | mic | mc | mc | graffiti | graffiti | fashion | fashion | sex | sex | feminist | feminist | electronica | electronica | mediated performance | mediated performance | anarchy | anarchy | commodity fetishism | commodity fetishism | globalization | globalization | whiteness | whiteness | realness | realness | journalism | journalism | criticism | criticism | autobiography | autobiography | black | black

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day. Tracing theories of and about gender, sexuality and sexual identity over time, we will examine the genealogy of "queer" as a term that has emerged to trouble and challenge static and essentialized notions of identity. The social, cultural, and political effect of "queer" has been to pose critical challenges to gay/lesbian/straight identities predicated on a sexual binary. Queer studies shifts the focus of inquiry from sexual identities to sexual practices, ma This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day. Tracing theories of and about gender, sexuality and sexual identity over time, we will examine the genealogy of "queer" as a term that has emerged to trouble and challenge static and essentialized notions of identity. The social, cultural, and political effect of "queer" has been to pose critical challenges to gay/lesbian/straight identities predicated on a sexual binary. Queer studies shifts the focus of inquiry from sexual identities to sexual practices, ma

Subjects

women | women | gender studies | gender studies | sexual identity | sexual identity | gender identities | gender identities | gender | gender | queer | queer | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | queer studies | queer studies | gay | gay | lesbian | lesbian | straight identities | straight identities | sexual practices | sexual practices | sexuality | sexuality | freud | freud | foucault | foucault | sedgwick | sedgwick | rubin | rubin | butler | butler | homosexuality | homosexuality | homosexual | homosexual | gay marriage | gay marriage | AIDs | AIDs | feminism | feminism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.810 Topics in Philosophy of Science: Social Science (MIT) 24.810 Topics in Philosophy of Science: Social Science (MIT)

Description

This course offers an advanced survey of current debates about the ontology, methodology, and aims of the social sciences. This course offers an advanced survey of current debates about the ontology, methodology, and aims of the social sciences.

Subjects

Ontology | Ontology | methodology | methodology | social science | social science | human being | human being | human behavior | human behavior | social structure | social structure | practices | practices | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | individual | individual | society | society | mental state | mental state | values | values | theory | theory | objectivity | objectivity | reductionism | reductionism | individualism | individualism | holism | holism | prediction | prediction | laws | laws | explanation | explanation | rational choice | rational choice | functional | functional

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.337J Urban Design Policy and Action (MIT) 11.337J Urban Design Policy and Action (MIT)

Description

In this course we examine the relationship between public policy and urban design through readings, discussions, presentations, and papers. We also analyze the ways in which policies shape cities, and investigate how governments implement urban design. Students gain a critical understanding of both the complex system of governance within which urban design occurs and the effective tools available for creative intervention. In this course we examine the relationship between public policy and urban design through readings, discussions, presentations, and papers. We also analyze the ways in which policies shape cities, and investigate how governments implement urban design. Students gain a critical understanding of both the complex system of governance within which urban design occurs and the effective tools available for creative intervention.

Subjects

design policy | design policy | government | government | urban design policy | urban design policy | tools of government | tools of government | private developers | private developers | community groups | community groups | political culture | political culture | city design | city design | toolkits for urban design | toolkits for urban design | neighborhood design | neighborhood design | best practices | best practices | new urbanism | new urbanism | neighborhood unit | neighborhood unit | garden city | garden city

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values, and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs through a combination of lectures, demonstrations and in-class activities complemented by participation in small study groups and completion of homework assignments. This course examines interpersonal and group dynamics, considers how the thoughts, feelings, and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values, and practices of large and small groups. Learning occurs through a combination of lectures, demonstrations and in-class activities complemented by participation in small study groups and completion of homework assignments.

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | psychology | psychology | social psychology | social psychology | ethics | ethics | self-esteem | self-esteem | aggression | aggression | social behavior | social behavior | cognition | cognition | attention | attention | emotion | emotion | motivation | motivation | personality behavior | personality behavior | interpersonal relationships | interpersonal relationships | human activity | human activity | physiological | physiological | neurological | neurological

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.68 Affect: Neurobiological, Psychological and Sociocultural Counterparts of "Feelings" (MIT) 9.68 Affect: Neurobiological, Psychological and Sociocultural Counterparts of "Feelings" (MIT)

Description

This course studies the relations of affect to cognition and behavior, feeling to thinking and acting, and values to beliefs and practices. These connections will be considered at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts. This course studies the relations of affect to cognition and behavior, feeling to thinking and acting, and values to beliefs and practices. These connections will be considered at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.

Subjects

Affect | Affect | cognition | cognition | behavior | behavior | feeling | feeling | thinking | thinking | acting | acting | values | values | beliefs | beliefs | practices | practices | relations | relations | organization | organization | neurobiology | neurobiology | sociocultural | sociocultural | psychology | psychology | stress | stress | ecological identity | ecological identity | human relationship with nature | human relationship with nature

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of Feelings (MIT) 9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of Feelings (MIT)

Description

Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting, or as values are to beliefs and practices. This course considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.In this class, diverse aspects of the current scientific paradigm which is based largely on a distrust of emotions is explored as well as other perspectives within a broader human-ecological context. Relevant issues are approached both experientially and theoretically through discussions in class and in study groups, and through field trips and assigned readings. Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting, or as values are to beliefs and practices. This course considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts.In this class, diverse aspects of the current scientific paradigm which is based largely on a distrust of emotions is explored as well as other perspectives within a broader human-ecological context. Relevant issues are approached both experientially and theoretically through discussions in class and in study groups, and through field trips and assigned readings.

Subjects

Affect | Affect | cognition | cognition | behavior | behavior | feeling | feeling | thinking | thinking | acting | acting | values | values | beliefs | beliefs | practices | practices | relations | relations | organization | organization | neurobiology | neurobiology | sociocultural | sociocultural | Psychology | Psychology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.947 History and Theory of Historic Preservation (MIT) 11.947 History and Theory of Historic Preservation (MIT)

Description

This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation, but is not an applied, technical course. This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation, but is not an applied, technical course.

Subjects

history | history | theory of historic preservation | theory of historic preservation | traditions and practices | traditions and practices | historic preservation movement | historic preservation movement | laws | laws | public policies and cultural attitudes | public policies and cultural attitudes | building conservation and restoration | building conservation and restoration | urban studies and planning | urban studies and planning | architecture | architecture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

In this course we learn social psychology both theoretically and practically. We examine interpersonal and group dynamics, and explore how the thoughts, feelings and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. We experience the social interactions and personal reactions in the real social situations of the class. In this course we learn social psychology both theoretically and practically. We examine interpersonal and group dynamics, and explore how the thoughts, feelings and actions of individuals are influenced by (and influence) the beliefs, values and practices of large and small groups. We experience the social interactions and personal reactions in the real social situations of the class.

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | Psychology | Psychology | social psychology | social psychology | ethics | ethics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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RES.TLL-01 Guidelines for Teaching @ MIT and Beyond (MIT) RES.TLL-01 Guidelines for Teaching @ MIT and Beyond (MIT)

Description

Guidelines on Teaching @ MIT and Beyond is a web-based resource describing evidence-based practices for the design, delivery, and assessment of teaching and learning experiences for students. Quotes from the literature are used to describe each guideline, and additional supporting literature and examples of each guideline in action at MIT are provided. Guidelines for Teaching @ MIT and Beyond is the MIT Teaching and Learning Laboratory’s adaptation of the Guidelines on Learning that Inform Teaching originally created and published by the University of New South Wales. Guidelines on Teaching @ MIT and Beyond is a web-based resource describing evidence-based practices for the design, delivery, and assessment of teaching and learning experiences for students. Quotes from the literature are used to describe each guideline, and additional supporting literature and examples of each guideline in action at MIT are provided. Guidelines for Teaching @ MIT and Beyond is the MIT Teaching and Learning Laboratory’s adaptation of the Guidelines on Learning that Inform Teaching originally created and published by the University of New South Wales.

Subjects

educational experiences | educational experiences | guidelines on teaching | guidelines on teaching | guidelines on learning | guidelines on learning | evidence-based practices | evidence-based practices | curriculum and teaching | curriculum and teaching | higher education | higher education

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT) 21L.015 Introduction to Media Studies (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of media. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, performance, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. This year’s course will focus on issues of network culture and media convergence, addressing such subjects as Intellectual Property, peer2peer authoring, blogging, and game modification. Introduction to Media Studies is designed for students who have grown up in a rapidly changing global multimedia environment and want to become more literate and critical consumers and producers of media. Through an interdisciplinary comparative and historical lens, the course defines "media" broadly as including oral, print, performance, photographic, broadcast, cinematic, and digital cultural forms and practices. The course looks at the nature of mediated communication, the functions of media, the history of transformations in media and the institutions that help define media's place in society. This year’s course will focus on issues of network culture and media convergence, addressing such subjects as Intellectual Property, peer2peer authoring, blogging, and game modification.

Subjects

Comparative Media Studies | Comparative Media Studies | global multimedia environment | global multimedia environment | literate | literate | critical | critical | consumers | consumers | producers | producers | interdisciplinary | interdisciplinary | comparative | comparative | historical | historical | lens | lens | the course defines oral | the course defines oral | print | print | performance | performance | photographic | photographic | broadcast | broadcast | cinematic | cinematic | digital | digital | cultural | cultural | forms | forms | practices | practices | mediated communication | mediated communication | functions | functions | society | society | network culture | network culture | media convergence | media convergence | Intellectual Property | Intellectual Property | peer2peer authoring | peer2peer authoring | blogging | blogging | game modification | game modification | lens | the course defines oral | lens | the course defines oral

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.358 The Software Business (MIT) 15.358 The Software Business (MIT)

Description

This subject is a seminar-style course aimed at anyone who is interested in founding a software company or working for a software company or company that uses software technology extensively as a senior manager, developer, or product/program manager. It is also appropriate for people interested in the industry or in working as an industry analyst. Many of the issues we discuss are highly relevant for companies whose businesses are heavily dependent on software, such as in e-business or financial services, or embedded software for industrial applications. This subject is a seminar-style course aimed at anyone who is interested in founding a software company or working for a software company or company that uses software technology extensively as a senior manager, developer, or product/program manager. It is also appropriate for people interested in the industry or in working as an industry analyst. Many of the issues we discuss are highly relevant for companies whose businesses are heavily dependent on software, such as in e-business or financial services, or embedded software for industrial applications.

Subjects

software companies | software companies | strategy | strategy | software business history | software business history | microsoft | microsoft | management | management | organization | organization | IT firms | IT firms | best practices | best practices | NET | NET | I2EE | I2EE | software platforms | software platforms | software development | software development | software sales | software sales | software marketing | software marketing | software entrepreneurship | software entrepreneurship | open source | open source | outsourcing | outsourcing

License

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15.010 Economic Analysis for Business Decisions (MIT) 15.010 Economic Analysis for Business Decisions (MIT)

Description

15.010 is the Sloan School's core subject in microeconomics, with sections for non-Sloan students labeled 15.011. Our objective is to give you a working knowledge of the analytical tools that bear most directly on the economic decisions firms must regularly make. We will emphasize market structure and industrial performance, including the strategic interaction of firms. We will examine the behavior of individual markets -- and the producers and consumers that sell and buy in those markets -- in some detail, focusing on cost analysis, the determinants of market demand, pricing strategy, market power, and the implications of government regulatory policies. We will also examine the implications of economics on other business practices, such as incentive plans, auctions, and transfer pricing. 15.010 is the Sloan School's core subject in microeconomics, with sections for non-Sloan students labeled 15.011. Our objective is to give you a working knowledge of the analytical tools that bear most directly on the economic decisions firms must regularly make. We will emphasize market structure and industrial performance, including the strategic interaction of firms. We will examine the behavior of individual markets -- and the producers and consumers that sell and buy in those markets -- in some detail, focusing on cost analysis, the determinants of market demand, pricing strategy, market power, and the implications of government regulatory policies. We will also examine the implications of economics on other business practices, such as incentive plans, auctions, and transfer pricing.

Subjects

auctions | auctions | transfer pricing | transfer pricing | market structure | market structure | industrial performance | industrial performance | strategic interaction of firms | strategic interaction of firms | individual markets | individual markets | producers and consumers | producers and consumers | sell and buy | sell and buy | cost analysis | cost analysis | determinants of market demand | determinants of market demand | pricing strategy | pricing strategy | market power | market power | implications of government regulatory policies | implications of government regulatory policies | implications of economics | implications of economics | business practices | business practices | incentive plans | incentive plans

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Political ideas in revolution Political ideas in revolution

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module introduces students to the ideas of key thinkers in the history of western political thought. We look carefully at the canonical works of five thinkers in the history of political thought: Plato, Aristotle, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. The module considers the impact of these thinkers on ancient and modern political thought and practices, with reference to the different contexts in which they wrote. We consider the way in which these thinkers have approached the ‘big’ questions and ideas that lie behind everyday political life. The module examines questions such as: What is justice? What is the purpose of government? What is the This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This module introduces students to the ideas of key thinkers in the history of western political thought. We look carefully at the canonical works of five thinkers in the history of political thought: Plato, Aristotle, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. The module considers the impact of these thinkers on ancient and modern political thought and practices, with reference to the different contexts in which they wrote. We consider the way in which these thinkers have approached the ‘big’ questions and ideas that lie behind everyday political life. The module examines questions such as: What is justice? What is the purpose of government? What is the

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | module code M11001 | module code M11001 | history of western political thought | history of western political thought | module code M11151 | module code M11151 | Plato | Plato | Aristotle | Aristotle | Niccolo Machiavelli | Niccolo Machiavelli | Thomas Hobbes | Thomas Hobbes | John Locke | John Locke | ancient and modern political thought and practices | ancient and modern political thought and practices

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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15.764 The Theory of Operations Management (MIT) 15.764 The Theory of Operations Management (MIT)

Description

The doctoral seminar 15.764 focuses on theoretical work for studying operations planning and control problems. This term's special topic, "Customer-Driven Operations," considers how a number of companies have succeeded in focusing their operation systems on the customer. The class reviews the quantitative models and theoretical tools underlying some of the customer-driven operational practices of these cutting-edge companies. Students will read and present research papers on topics such as distribution systems, short life-cycle product management, and forecast evolution models. This MIT OpenCourseWare site is dedicated to the memory of Bhuwan Singh, a member of the class. The doctoral seminar 15.764 focuses on theoretical work for studying operations planning and control problems. This term's special topic, "Customer-Driven Operations," considers how a number of companies have succeeded in focusing their operation systems on the customer. The class reviews the quantitative models and theoretical tools underlying some of the customer-driven operational practices of these cutting-edge companies. Students will read and present research papers on topics such as distribution systems, short life-cycle product management, and forecast evolution models. This MIT OpenCourseWare site is dedicated to the memory of Bhuwan Singh, a member of the class.

Subjects

operations management | operations management | customer-focused operation systems | customer-focused operation systems | customer focus | customer focus | direct-to-consumer business model | direct-to-consumer business model | life-cycle management | life-cycle management | customer-driven operations | customer-driven operations | operational practices | operational practices | distribution systems | distribution systems | customer choice models | customer choice models | assemble-to-order production systems | assemble-to-order production systems | customer service centers | customer service centers | forecast evolution models | forecast evolution models | warehouse systems | warehouse systems | inventory policies | inventory policies | procurement | procurement | managing customer relationships | managing customer relationships | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | short life-cycle production management | short life-cycle production management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.70 Social Psychology (MIT) 9.70 Social Psychology (MIT)

Description

Our conjoint participation in the 9.70 learning system places us in a consensually-shared social situation. (All of the foregoing words are important. Do you understand their meaning in this context?) We will endeavor to organize ourselves into a community of discourse that approximates (albeit in an altogether partial way) a meaningful, real-world research enterprise: Like all scientific communities, we will work with limited resources. Unlike "real" scientific communities, ours will operate under the constraint of predetermined project duration and contractually agreed-upon limits in the amount of time and effort to be contributed to it by the individual participants. Toward this end, we randomly divide the membership of the class – at the outset — into subsystems – s Our conjoint participation in the 9.70 learning system places us in a consensually-shared social situation. (All of the foregoing words are important. Do you understand their meaning in this context?) We will endeavor to organize ourselves into a community of discourse that approximates (albeit in an altogether partial way) a meaningful, real-world research enterprise: Like all scientific communities, we will work with limited resources. Unlike "real" scientific communities, ours will operate under the constraint of predetermined project duration and contractually agreed-upon limits in the amount of time and effort to be contributed to it by the individual participants. Toward this end, we randomly divide the membership of the class – at the outset — into subsystems – s

Subjects

group dynamics | group dynamics | thoughts | thoughts | feelings | feelings | actions | actions | influence | influence | beliefs | beliefs | values | values | practices | practices | groups | groups | Psychology | Psychology | social psychology | social psychology | ethics | ethics | self-esteem | self-esteem | aggression | aggression | complex social creatures | complex social creatures | mental functions | mental functions | behavior | behavior | symbolic interpretation | symbolic interpretation | critical analysis | critical analysis | social sciences | social sciences | sociology | sociology | perception | perception | cognition | cognition | attention | attention | emotion | emotion | motivation | motivation | personality behavior | personality behavior | interpersonal relationships | interpersonal relationships | human activity | human activity | physiological | physiological | neurological | neurological | human development | human development | natural sciences | natural sciences | humanities | humanities | psychologist. | psychologist.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of "Feelings" (MIT) 9.68 Affect: Biological, Psychological, and Social Aspects of "Feelings" (MIT)

Description

Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting, or as values are to beliefs and practices. Considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and also in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts. In addition to attending weekly class sessions and doing regular homework assignments, students are required to participate in small study groups that meet independently for two hours per week. Affect is to cognition and behavior as feeling is to thinking and acting, or as values are to beliefs and practices. Considers these relations, both at the psychological level of organization and also in terms of their neurobiological and sociocultural counterparts. In addition to attending weekly class sessions and doing regular homework assignments, students are required to participate in small study groups that meet independently for two hours per week.

Subjects

Affect | Affect | cognition | cognition | behavior | behavior | feeling | feeling | thinking | thinking | acting | acting | values | values | beliefs | beliefs | practices | practices | relations | relations | organization | organization | neurobiology | neurobiology | sociocultural | sociocultural | Psychology | Psychology | Biological | Biological | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | exercise behavior | exercise behavior | stress | stress | environmental factors | environmental factors | ecological identity | ecological identity | human relationship with nature | human relationship with nature | positive affiliations | positive affiliations | therapeutic education | therapeutic education | natural care | natural care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.96 Management in Engineering (MIT) 2.96 Management in Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course gives an overview of engineering management and covers topics such as financial principles, management of innovation, technology strategy, and best management practices. The focus of the course is the development of individual skills and team work. This is carried out through an exposure to management tools. This course gives an overview of engineering management and covers topics such as financial principles, management of innovation, technology strategy, and best management practices. The focus of the course is the development of individual skills and team work. This is carried out through an exposure to management tools.

Subjects

engineering management | engineering management | financial principles | financial principles | innovation in management | innovation in management | technology strategy | technology strategy | management practices | management practices | project planning | project planning | technical strategy | technical strategy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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