Searching for prejudice : 25 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | brain imaging | brain imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | attention | attention | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.301J Feminist Thought (MIT) WGS.301J Feminist Thought (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes theories of gender and politics, especially ideologies of gender and their construction. Also discussed are definitions of public and private spheres, gender issues in citizenship, the development of the welfare state, experiences of war and revolution, class formation, and the politics of sexuality.Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research. This course analyzes theories of gender and politics, especially ideologies of gender and their construction. Also discussed are definitions of public and private spheres, gender issues in citizenship, the development of the welfare state, experiences of war and revolution, class formation, and the politics of sexuality.Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

WGS.301 | WGS.301 | 17.007 | 17.007 | 24.237 | 24.237 | feminism | feminism | feminist | feminist | sex | sex | gender | gender | oppression | oppression | Humanist approach | Humanist approach | Gynocentric approach | Gynocentric approach | Dominance approach | Dominance approach | social construction | social construction | liberal | liberal | subjection | subjection | female | female | politics | politics | pornography | pornography | lesbian | lesbian | Simone de Beauvoir | Simone de Beauvoir | Butler | Butler | domestic violence | domestic violence | prejudice | prejudice | queer theory | queer theory | masculinity | masculinity | epistemic injustice | epistemic injustice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

In this class, you will read, think about, and (I hope) enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary genres today, if not the most popular: the novel. Some of the questions we will consider are: Why did so many novels appear in the eighteenth century? Why were they—and are they—called novels? Who wrote them? Who read them? Who narrates them? What are they likely to be about? Do they have distinctive characteristics? What is their relationship to the time and place in which they appeared? How have they changed over the years? And, most of all, why do we like to read them so much? In this class, you will read, think about, and (I hope) enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary genres today, if not the most popular: the novel. Some of the questions we will consider are: Why did so many novels appear in the eighteenth century? Why were they—and are they—called novels? Who wrote them? Who read them? Who narrates them? What are they likely to be about? Do they have distinctive characteristics? What is their relationship to the time and place in which they appeared? How have they changed over the years? And, most of all, why do we like to read them so much?

Subjects

novel | novel | literary genre | literary genre | narrator | narrator | daniel defoe | daniel defoe | moll flanders | moll flanders | frances burney | frances burney | evelina | evelina | jane austen | jane austen | pride and prejudice | pride and prejudice | elizabeth gaskell | elizabeth gaskell | mary barton | mary barton | george eliot | george eliot | adam bede | adam bede | mary elizabeth braddon | mary elizabeth braddon | lady audley's secret | lady audley's secret | thomas hardy | thomas hardy | tess of the d'urbervilles | tess of the d'urbervilles | virginia woolf | virginia woolf | mrs. dalloway | mrs. dalloway | essay | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

Subjects

novel | novel | literary genre | literary genre | narrator | narrator | daniel defoe | daniel defoe | moll flanders | moll flanders | frances burney | frances burney | evelina | evelina | jane austen | jane austen | pride and prejudice | pride and prejudice | elizabeth gaskell | elizabeth gaskell | mary barton | mary barton | george eliot | george eliot | adam bede | adam bede | mary elizabeth braddon | mary elizabeth braddon | lady audley's secret | lady audley's secret | thomas hardy | thomas hardy | tess of the d'urbervilles | tess of the d'urbervilles | virginia woolf | virginia woolf | mrs. dalloway | mrs. dalloway | essay | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.506 Ethnic Politics II (MIT) 17.506 Ethnic Politics II (MIT)

Description

This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling. This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling.

Subjects

measurement | measurement | ethnic diversity | ethnic diversity | fluidity | fluidity | identity | identity | social identity theory | social identity theory | mechanisms of group comparison | mechanisms of group comparison | memory | memory | death | death | stigma | stigma | prejudice | prejudice | contact hypothesis | contact hypothesis | cascade models | cascade models | identity simulation | identity simulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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UD Soriano Architectural Design 2012-13 UD Soriano Architectural Design 2012-13

Description

The subject Pop Up Islands: Architectures that appear and disappear operates from the postproduction, that is, the manipulation of pre-existing material, to act over it and finish setting it in architectural representation. The work is done in three people teams, unknown to each other, one from each university involved in the progress of each term. The subject Pop Up Islands: Architectures that appear and disappear operates from the postproduction, that is, the manipulation of pre-existing material, to act over it and finish setting it in architectural representation. The work is done in three people teams, unknown to each other, one from each university involved in the progress of each term.

Subjects

Graphic expression | Graphic expression | Proyectos Arquitectónicos | Proyectos Arquitectónicos | Architectural standar | Architectural standar | Postproducción | Postproducción | Trabajo en equipo | Trabajo en equipo | Desprejuiciamiento | Desprejuiciamiento | Proyectos arquitectónicos | Proyectos arquitectónicos | Teamwork | Teamwork | Estándar arquitectónico | Estándar arquitectónico | Expresión gráfica | Expresión gráfica | Postproduction | Postproduction | Unprejudiced | Unprejudiced

License

Copyright 2009, by the Contributing Authors http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT) STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies. This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | neurobiology | imaging | imaging | MRI | MRI | CT scan | CT scan | fMRI | fMRI | brain | brain | mind | mind | impluse | impluse | brain imaging | brain imaging | morality | morality | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | decision making | decision making | intelligence | intelligence | empathy | empathy | trust | trust | religion | religion | love | love | emotion | emotion | gender differences | gender differences | sexuality | sexuality | stress | stress | prejudice | prejudice | mental focus | mental focus | psychopharmaceuticals | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neuromarketing | neurotheology | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | cognitive enhancement | witness | witness | courtroom testimony | courtroom testimony | addiction | addiction | violence | violence | learning | learning | behavior | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

In this class you will read, think about, and hopefully enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary genres today (if not the most popular): the novel.Recommended CitationFor any use or distribution of these materials, please cite as follows:Ina Lipkowitz, course materials for 21L.471 Major English Novels, Spring 2007. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu/), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Downloaded on [DD Month YYYY].

Subjects

novel | literary genre | narrator | daniel defoe | moll flanders | frances burney | evelina | jane austen | pride and prejudice | elizabeth gaskell | mary barton | george eliot | adam bede | mary elizabeth braddon | lady audley's secret | thomas hardy | tess of the d'urbervilles | virginia woolf | mrs. dalloway | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

In this class, you will read, think about, and (I hope) enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary genres today, if not the most popular: the novel. Some of the questions we will consider are: Why did so many novels appear in the eighteenth century? Why were they—and are they—called novels? Who wrote them? Who read them? Who narrates them? What are they likely to be about? Do they have distinctive characteristics? What is their relationship to the time and place in which they appeared? How have they changed over the years? And, most of all, why do we like to read them so much?

Subjects

novel | literary genre | narrator | daniel defoe | moll flanders | frances burney | evelina | jane austen | pride and prejudice | elizabeth gaskell | mary barton | george eliot | adam bede | mary elizabeth braddon | lady audley's secret | thomas hardy | tess of the d'urbervilles | virginia woolf | mrs. dalloway | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | brain imaging | MRI | CT scan | fMRI | brain | mind | morality | moral reasoning | decision making | intelligence | empathy | trust | religion | love | emotion | gender differences | sexuality | stress | prejudice | attention | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | witness | courtroom testimony | addiction | violence | learning | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Religion today: Themes and issues

Description

There is a widespread perception in the West that we live in a secular age, an age in which religion is at best an optional extra, if not a false delusion completely out of place. However, religion still arouses passion and causes controversy; it controls and transforms lives. An informed understanding of the contemporary world thus requires an appreciation of the role of religion in shaping ideas, world-views and actions that have an impact on the social as well as on the personal life of the individual. This free course, Religion today: Themes and issues, gives you a glimpse into this fascinating area. First published on Thu, 23 Jun 2011 as Religion today: Themes and issues. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

Religious Studies | belief | representation | communities | identity | Buddhism | Christianity | Islam | prejudices | anorexia | Hinduism | Judaism | religions | AD317_1

License

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Religion today: Themes and issues

Description

There is a widespread perception in the West that we live in a secular age an age in which religion is at best an optional extra if not a false delusion completely out of place. However religion still arouses passion and causes controversy; it controls and transforms lives. An informed understanding of the contemporary world thus requires an appreciation of the role of religion in shaping ideas world-views and actions that have an impact on the social as well as on the personal life of the individual. This free course gives you a glimpse into this fascinating area.

Subjects

Religious Studies | belief | representation | communities | identity | Buddhism | Christianity | Islam | prejudices | anorexia | Hinduism | Judaism | religions | AD317_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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STS.010 Neuroscience and Society (MIT)

Description

This class explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subjects

cognitive science | evolutionary psychology | neurobiology | imaging | MRI | CT scan | fMRI | brain | mind | impluse | brain imaging | morality | moral reasoning | decision making | intelligence | empathy | trust | religion | love | emotion | gender differences | sexuality | stress | prejudice | mental focus | psychopharmaceuticals | antidepressant | neuroeconomics | neuromarketing | neurotheology | cognitive enhancement | witness | courtroom testimony | addiction | violence | learning | behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.301J Feminist Thought (MIT)

Description

This course analyzes theories of gender and politics, especially ideologies of gender and their construction. Also discussed are definitions of public and private spheres, gender issues in citizenship, the development of the welfare state, experiences of war and revolution, class formation, and the politics of sexuality.Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

WGS.301 | 17.007 | 24.237 | feminism | feminist | sex | gender | oppression | Humanist approach | Gynocentric approach | Dominance approach | social construction | liberal | subjection | female | politics | pornography | lesbian | Simone de Beauvoir | Butler | domestic violence | prejudice | queer theory | masculinity | epistemic injustice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Paralympic narratives- perceptions of disability

Description

The Paralympic Games have the potential to change popular perceptions of disability. 1- Is the specific legacy potential of the Paralympic Games taken seriously by politicians and Games organisers? 2- Could stories about the Paralympic Games and disabled athletes have a negative impact on disabled people? 3- Is it asking too much of the Paralympic Games to change people’s attitudes towards disability?

Subjects

sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | media | culture | impacts | perception | legacy | stereotypes | prejudice | can:22/07/2011:x0005 | hlst | ll2012 | london 2012 | olympics | olympic games | paralympics | paralympic games | learning legacies | jisc | hea | hlstoer | canterbury christ church university | spear | 2012 legacies for learning | SPORTS GAMES and RECREATION | M

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Social Psychology

Description

This course will introduce the student to the concepts of social psychology, which focuses primarily on the individual’s psychology as part of the group or society. Because humans are social creatures and almost invariably exist in a social context, social psychology deals with a huge range of aspects of human life, including love, attraction, aggression, helping behaviors (or altruism), and obedience. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Psychology 301)

Subjects

social psychology | perception | cognition | conformity | obedience | bystander effect | stereotypes | prejudice | discrimination | interpersonal | attraction | aggression | altruism | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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'Race', ethnicity and sport

Description

Sport can be an extremely useful lens though which to examine the complexities of human ideas about ethnic and racial 'difference'. Not only have sporting events (and the Olympics especially so) become sites through which racial prejudice has been challenged, but they have also been spaces in which people from minority 'racial' groups (e.g. in the USA and Great Britain) have achieved enormous success

Subjects

ethnicity | sport | success | ethnic | culture | cultural differences | nationality | prejudice | stereotype | history | presence | heritage | race | black african | black history | black history month | bhm | british asian history | british asians | black britons | black leaders | black artists | black activists | black photographers | black communities | black and asian presence | black business | black entrepreneurship | black scholarship | black integration | black culture | black identity | black civil rights | african | asian | britain | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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Windrush settlers

Description

At the end of the Second World War, Britain was busy rebuilding. The government was thinking about recruiting workers from the Caribbean to cope with the shortage of labour in some British industries. In 1948, an advertisement appeared in a Jamaican newspaper. It stated that there were 300 places on board Windrush for anyone wishing to travel to Britain. The arrival of the Windrush was the start of a period of migration from the Caribbean to Britain that did not slow down until 1962. By 1955, 18,000 Jamaicans had moved to Britain. This outward flow of people to settle in Britain was an important event in the history of the West Indies. It also changed the social landscape of Britain

Subjects

immigration | culture change | culture | ethnicity | sport | success | ethnic | cultural differences | nationality | prejudice | stereotype | history | presence | heritage | windrush | jamaica | jamaicans | african caribbean | black culture | brixton | west indies | race | black african | black history | black history month | bhm | british asian history | british asians | black britons | black leaders | black artists | black activists | black photographers | black communities | black and asian presence | black business | black entrepreneurship | black scholarship | black integration | black identity | black civil rights | african | asian | britain | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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Prejudice

Description

A learning object produced for the X4L Colossus Project. It looks at prejudice as a particular form of attitude.

Subjects

colossus project | hart | prejudice | psychology | stevenson college edinburgh | x4l | attitudes | social identity | identity | colossus | Biological Sciences | SAFETY | Teaching | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | Biological sciences | C000 | HEALTH CARE / MEDICINE / HEALTH and SAFETY | P

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Paralympic Narratives- Perceptions of Disability

Description

’s attitudes towards disability?

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | Canterbury Christ Church University | SPEAR | media | culture | impacts | perception | legacy | stereotypes | prejudice | can:22/07/2011:x0005

License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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17.506 Ethnic Politics II (MIT)

Description

This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling.

Subjects

measurement | ethnic diversity | fluidity | identity | social identity theory | mechanisms of group comparison | memory | death | stigma | prejudice | contact hypothesis | cascade models | identity simulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Factors that Influence Learning

Description

During this lesson, we will identify and analyse personal, social and cultural factors that influence learning. As part of this, we will develop an understanding of the terms prejudice, stereotyping and labelling. We will also discuss some common themes in prejudice and discrimination and reflect on how personal values and beliefs may impact on professional practice. Finally, we will evaluate the impact of cognitive, physical and sensory abilities on learning.

Subjects

influence of cognitive abilities on learning | factors influencing disabled learners | factors that influence learning | prejudice | stereotyping and labelling | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Religion today: Themes and issues

Description

There is a widespread perception in the West that we live in a secular age an age in which religion is at best an optional extra if not a false delusion completely out of place. However religion still arouses passion and causes controversy; it controls and transforms lives. An informed understanding of the contemporary world thus requires an appreciation of the role of religion in shaping ideas world-views and actions that have an impact on the social as well as on the personal life of the individual. This free course

Subjects

Religious Studies | belief | representation | communities | identity | Buddhism | Christianity | Islam | prejudices | anorexia | Hinduism | Judaism | religions | AD317_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 Except for third party materials and otherwise stated in the acknowledgement section (see our terms and conditions http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions) this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence. - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0

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Key Features of a Culture that Promotes Equality and Values Diversity

Description

The lesson objectives for this lesson include, firstly, a review of the distinction between the terms equality and diversity. Secondly, we will identify primary and secondary dimensions of diversity, including a review of the terms, prejudice, stereotyping and labelling. Thirdly, we will discuss common themes in prejudice and discrimination and reflect on how personal values and beliefs may impact on professional practice. Finally, we will determine how organisations can promote equality and diversity and reflect on how well your own organisation’s equality and diversity policies and procedures meet these ideals.

Subjects

dimensions of diversity | defining equality and diversity | prejudice | stereotyping and labelling | grievances | complaints and appeals | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Paralympic Narratives- Perceptions of Disability

Description

?s attitudes towards disability?

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | Canterbury Christ Church University | SPEAR | media | culture | impacts | perception | legacy | stereotypes | prejudice | can:22/07/2011:x0005

License

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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