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7.344 Treating Infertility-- From Bench to Bedside and Bedside to Bench (MIT) 7.344 Treating Infertility-- From Bench to Bedside and Bedside to Bench (MIT)

Description

In the western world, approximately 10–15% of couples suffer from subfertility. Consequently, over 5 million babies have been born thanks to assisted reproductive technologies, and more than half of those have been born in the past six years alone. This class will cover the basic biology behind fertility and explore the etiology of infertility. We will highlight open questions in reproductive biology, familiarize students with both tried-and-true and emerging reproductive technologies, and explore the advantages and pitfalls of each. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in In the western world, approximately 10–15% of couples suffer from subfertility. Consequently, over 5 million babies have been born thanks to assisted reproductive technologies, and more than half of those have been born in the past six years alone. This class will cover the basic biology behind fertility and explore the etiology of infertility. We will highlight open questions in reproductive biology, familiarize students with both tried-and-true and emerging reproductive technologies, and explore the advantages and pitfalls of each. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in

Subjects

fertility | fertility | infertility | infertility | assisted reproductive technology | assisted reproductive technology | gonadal stem cells | gonadal stem cells | reproductive biology | reproductive biology | embryo cryopreservation | embryo cryopreservation | oocyte cryopreservation | oocyte cryopreservation | antral follicle counts | antral follicle counts | microdeletions | microdeletions | aneuploidy | aneuploidy | reproductive phenotypes | reproductive phenotypes

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11.947 History and Theory of Historic Preservation (MIT) 11.947 History and Theory of Historic Preservation (MIT)

Description

This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation, but is not an applied, technical course. This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation, but is not an applied, technical course.

Subjects

history | history | theory of historic preservation | theory of historic preservation | traditions and practices | traditions and practices | historic preservation movement | historic preservation movement | laws | laws | public policies and cultural attitudes | public policies and cultural attitudes | building conservation and restoration | building conservation and restoration | urban studies and planning | urban studies and planning | architecture | architecture

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STS.036 Industrial Landscapes (MIT) STS.036 Industrial Landscapes (MIT)

Description

What makes a landscape industrial? What makes an industrial site a landscape? This class considers how the development of technology in America intersected with the natural world, in some cases reshaping its contours and meanings, and in other cases getting redefined by nature's largesse or diminished capacity. The dynamic relationship between these two forces offers many examples of "historical camouflage" in which places and things are not entirely what they seem to be. At this point in history, what things that we see are not industrial in some way? How can we learn the history of places, both obviously industrial like factories, and not so obviously, like supermarkets? Is there a pattern in urban and rural places regarding where things are located, What makes a landscape industrial? What makes an industrial site a landscape? This class considers how the development of technology in America intersected with the natural world, in some cases reshaping its contours and meanings, and in other cases getting redefined by nature's largesse or diminished capacity. The dynamic relationship between these two forces offers many examples of "historical camouflage" in which places and things are not entirely what they seem to be. At this point in history, what things that we see are not industrial in some way? How can we learn the history of places, both obviously industrial like factories, and not so obviously, like supermarkets? Is there a pattern in urban and rural places regarding where things are located,

Subjects

landscape | landscape | technology | technology | nature | nature | wilderness | wilderness | industry | industry | industrial | industrial | commons | commons | america | america | history | history | agriculture | agriculture | systems | systems | conservation | conservation | preservation | preservation | development | development | environment | environment

License

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STS.036 Technology and Nature in American History (MIT) STS.036 Technology and Nature in American History (MIT)

Description

This course considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, ideologies, and institutions, particularly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Topics include land-use patterns; the changing shape of cities and farms; the redesign of water systems; the construction of roads, dams, bridges, irrigation systems; the creation of national parks; ideas about wilderness; and the role of nature in an industrial world. From small farms to suburbia, Walden Pond to Yosemite, we will ask how technological and natural forces have interacted, and whether there is a place for nature in a technological world. Acknowledgement This class is based on one originally designed and taught by Prof. Deborah Fitzgerald. Her Fall 2004 version can be viewed by This course considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, ideologies, and institutions, particularly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Topics include land-use patterns; the changing shape of cities and farms; the redesign of water systems; the construction of roads, dams, bridges, irrigation systems; the creation of national parks; ideas about wilderness; and the role of nature in an industrial world. From small farms to suburbia, Walden Pond to Yosemite, we will ask how technological and natural forces have interacted, and whether there is a place for nature in a technological world. Acknowledgement This class is based on one originally designed and taught by Prof. Deborah Fitzgerald. Her Fall 2004 version can be viewed by

Subjects

landscape | landscape | technology | technology | nature | nature | wilderness | wilderness | industry | industry | industrial | industrial | commons | commons | America | America | history | history | agriculture | agriculture | systems | systems | conservation | conservation | preservation | preservation | development | development | environment | environment | native American | native American | railroad | railroad | transportation | transportation | aesthetics | aesthetics | colonial history | colonial history | Dust Bowl | Dust Bowl | National Parks | National Parks | water | water | drought | drought | natural resources | natural resources | food | food | materialism | materialism | capitalism | capitalism | organic food | organic food | photography | photography | film | film

License

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STS.429 Food and Power in the Twentieth Century (MIT) STS.429 Food and Power in the Twentieth Century (MIT)

Description

In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques – drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc – that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific hist In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques – drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc – that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific hist

Subjects

History | History | food | food | analysis | analysis | transform | transform | technological innovations | technological innovations | preserve | preserve | surplus | surplus | drying | drying | freezing | freezing | canning | canning | salting | salting | travel | travel | space | space | lived | lived | relations | relations | neighbors | neighbors | relatives | relatives | economic order | economic order | capitalism | capitalism | preservation | preservation | development | development | cultural | cultural | political | political | economic | economic | techno-scientific history | techno-scientific history | mass-production techniques | mass-production techniques | industrial farming initiatives | industrial farming initiatives | consumption | consumption | vertical integration | vertical integration | business firms | business firms | globalization | globalization | race | race | gender identities | gender identities | labor movements | labor movements | America | America

License

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | number states | coherent states | coherent states | and squeezed states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation. | and quantum teleportation.

License

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7.344 Treating Infertility-- From Bench to Bedside and Bedside to Bench (MIT)

Description

In the western world, approximately 10–15% of couples suffer from subfertility. Consequently, over 5 million babies have been born thanks to assisted reproductive technologies, and more than half of those have been born in the past six years alone. This class will cover the basic biology behind fertility and explore the etiology of infertility. We will highlight open questions in reproductive biology, familiarize students with both tried-and-true and emerging reproductive technologies, and explore the advantages and pitfalls of each. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in

Subjects

fertility | infertility | assisted reproductive technology | gonadal stem cells | reproductive biology | embryo cryopreservation | oocyte cryopreservation | antral follicle counts | microdeletions | aneuploidy | reproductive phenotypes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.423 Introduction to Anglo-American Folkmusic (MIT) 21L.423 Introduction to Anglo-American Folkmusic (MIT)

Description

This subject will introduce students to scholarship about folk music of the British Isles and North America. We will define the qualities of "folk music" and "folk poetry," including the narrative qualities of ballads, and we will try to recreate the historical context in which such music was an essential part of everyday life. We will survey the history of collecting, beginning with Pepys' collection of broadsides, Percy's Reliques and the Gow collections of fiddle tunes. The urge to collect folk music will be placed in its larger historical, social and political contexts. We will trace the migrations of fiddle styles and of sung ballads to look at the broad outlines of the story of collecting folk music in the USA, especially in the nineteenth and twentieth centurie This subject will introduce students to scholarship about folk music of the British Isles and North America. We will define the qualities of "folk music" and "folk poetry," including the narrative qualities of ballads, and we will try to recreate the historical context in which such music was an essential part of everyday life. We will survey the history of collecting, beginning with Pepys' collection of broadsides, Percy's Reliques and the Gow collections of fiddle tunes. The urge to collect folk music will be placed in its larger historical, social and political contexts. We will trace the migrations of fiddle styles and of sung ballads to look at the broad outlines of the story of collecting folk music in the USA, especially in the nineteenth and twentieth centurie

Subjects

folk music | folk music | music production | music production | music transmission | music transmission | music preservation | music preservation | British Isles | British Isles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | folk revival | folk revival | balladry | balladry | fiddle styles | fiddle styles | 21M.223 | 21M.223

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following.  Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation; P-representation and classical fields.  Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle; beam splitters; phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection, heterodyne detection, and homodyne detection.&a

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | number states | coherent states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields | P-representation and classical fields | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | quantum teleportation | quantum teleportation

License

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6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT) 6.453 Quantum Optical Communication (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola This course is offered to graduate students and covers topics in five major areas of quantum optical communication: quantum optics, single-mode and two-mode quantum systems, multi-mode quantum systems, nonlinear optics, and quantum systems theory. Specific topics include the following: Dirac notation quantum mechanics; harmonic oscillator quantization; number states, coherent states, and squeezed states; P-representation and classical fields; direct, homodyne, and heterodyne detection; linear propagation loss; phase insensitive and phase sensitive amplifiers; entanglement and teleportation; field quantization; quantum photodetection; phase-matched interactions; optical parametric amplifiers; generation of squeezed states, photon-twin beams, non-classical fourth-order interference, and pola

Subjects

Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | Quantum optics: Dirac notation quantum mechanics | harmonic oscillator quantization | harmonic oscillator quantization | number states | number states | coherent states | coherent states | and squeezed states | and squeezed states | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | radiation field quantization and quantum field propagation | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | P-representation and classical fields. Linear loss and linear amplification: commutator preservation and the Uncertainty Principle | beam splitters | beam splitters | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplifiers. Quantum photodetection: direct detection | heterodyne detection | heterodyne detection | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | and homodyne detection. Second-order nonlinear optics: phasematched interactions | optical parametric amplifiers | optical parametric amplifiers | generation of squeezed states | generation of squeezed states | photon-twin beams | photon-twin beams | non-classical fourth-order interference | non-classical fourth-order interference | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | and polarization entanglement. Quantum systems theory: optimum binary detection | quantum precision measurements | quantum precision measurements | quantum cryptography | quantum cryptography | and quantum teleportation. | and quantum teleportation.

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21H.S01 Food in American History (MIT) 21H.S01 Food in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will explore food in modern American history as a story of industrialization and globalization. Lectures, readings, and discussions will emphasize the historical dimensions of—and debates about—slave plantations and factory farm labor; industrial processing and technologies of food preservation; the political economy and ecology of global commodity chains; the vagaries of nutritional science; food restrictions and reform movements; food surpluses and famines; cooking traditions and innovations; the emergence of restaurants, supermarkets, fast food, and slow food. The core concern of the course will be to understand the increasingly pervasive influence of the American model of food production and consumption patterns. This course will explore food in modern American history as a story of industrialization and globalization. Lectures, readings, and discussions will emphasize the historical dimensions of—and debates about—slave plantations and factory farm labor; industrial processing and technologies of food preservation; the political economy and ecology of global commodity chains; the vagaries of nutritional science; food restrictions and reform movements; food surpluses and famines; cooking traditions and innovations; the emergence of restaurants, supermarkets, fast food, and slow food. The core concern of the course will be to understand the increasingly pervasive influence of the American model of food production and consumption patterns.

Subjects

food | food | American history | American history | industrialization | industrialization | globalization | globalization | slavery | slavery | plantations | plantations | farms | farms | labor | labor | processing | processing | preservation | preservation | economy | economy | chains | chains | nutrition | nutrition | nutritional science | nutritional science | food restrictions | food restrictions | surplus | surplus | famine | famine | cooking | cooking | restaurants | restaurants | supermarkets | supermarkets | fast food | fast food | slow food | slow food | production | production | consumption | consumption

License

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21L.423J Introduction to Anglo-American Folk Music (MIT) 21L.423J Introduction to Anglo-American Folk Music (MIT)

Description

This course examines the production, transmission, preservation and qualities of folk music in the British Isles and North America from the 18th century to the folk revival of the 1960s and the present. There is a special emphasis on balladry, fiddle styles, and African-American influences. The class sings ballads and folk songs from the Child and Lomax collections as well as other sources as we examine them from literary, historical, and musical points of view. Readings supply critical and background materials from a number of sources. Visitors and films bring additional perspectives. This course examines the production, transmission, preservation and qualities of folk music in the British Isles and North America from the 18th century to the folk revival of the 1960s and the present. There is a special emphasis on balladry, fiddle styles, and African-American influences. The class sings ballads and folk songs from the Child and Lomax collections as well as other sources as we examine them from literary, historical, and musical points of view. Readings supply critical and background materials from a number of sources. Visitors and films bring additional perspectives.

Subjects

21L.423 | 21L.423 | 21M.223 | 21M.223 | music production | music production | music transmission | music transmission | music preservation | music preservation | folk music | folk music | British Isles | British Isles | North America | North America | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 17th century | 17th century | 18th century | 18th century | folk revival | folk revival | balladry | balladry | fiddle styles | fiddle styles | Lomax | Lomax | ballad | ballad | anglo-scottish ballads | anglo-scottish ballads | fiddle | fiddle | the great confluence | the great confluence | appalachia | appalachia

License

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The Role of Digital Humanities in a Major Natural Disaster

Description

Paul Millar, CEISMIC Canterbury Earthquakes Digital Archive project leader, discusses the role of digital humanities in developing an international resource to preserve the digital record of the earthquakes' impacts and the long-term process of recovery. In the months since a 7.1 magnitude earthquake hit New Zealand's Canterbury province in September 2010, the region has experience over ten thousand aftershocks, 430 above magnitude 4.0. The most devastating aftershock, a 6.2 earthquake under the centre of Christchurch on 22 February 2011, had one of the highest peak ground acceleration rates ever recorded. This event claimed 185 lives, damaged 80% of the central city beyond repair, and forced the abandonment of 6,000 homes. It was the third costliest insurance event in history. In this t Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

natural disaster | information | disaster recovery | CEISMIC | digital archive | big data | curation | collaboration | preservation | digital humanities | internet | data | earthquake | natural disaster | information | disaster recovery | CEISMIC | digital archive | big data | curation | collaboration | preservation | digital humanities | internet | data | earthquake

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Role of Digital Humanities in a Major Natural Disaster

Description

Paul Millar, CEISMIC Canterbury Earthquakes Digital Archive project leader, discusses the role of digital humanities in developing an international resource to preserve the digital record of the earthquakes' impacts and the long-term process of recovery. In the months since a 7.1 magnitude earthquake hit New Zealand's Canterbury province in September 2010, the region has experience over ten thousand aftershocks, 430 above magnitude 4.0. The most devastating aftershock, a 6.2 earthquake under the centre of Christchurch on 22 February 2011, had one of the highest peak ground acceleration rates ever recorded. This event claimed 185 lives, damaged 80% of the central city beyond repair, and forced the abandonment of 6,000 homes. It was the third costliest insurance event in history. In this t Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

natural disaster | information | disaster recovery | CEISMIC | digital archive | big data | curation | collaboration | preservation | digital humanities | internet | data | earthquake | natural disaster | information | disaster recovery | CEISMIC | digital archive | big data | curation | collaboration | preservation | digital humanities | internet | data | earthquake

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.421 Introduction to Environmental History (MIT) 21H.421 Introduction to Environmental History (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides a historical overview of the interactions between people and their environments. Focusing primarily on the experience of Europeans in the period after Columbus, the subject explores the influence of nature (climate, topography, plants, animals, and microorganisms) on human history and the reciprocal influence of people on nature. Topics include the biological consequences of the European encounter with the Americas, the environmental impact of technology, and the roots of the current environmental crisis. This seminar provides a historical overview of the interactions between people and their environments. Focusing primarily on the experience of Europeans in the period after Columbus, the subject explores the influence of nature (climate, topography, plants, animals, and microorganisms) on human history and the reciprocal influence of people on nature. Topics include the biological consequences of the European encounter with the Americas, the environmental impact of technology, and the roots of the current environmental crisis.

Subjects

environmental history | environmental history | europe | europe | columbus | columbus | climate | climate | topography | topography | nature | nature | plants | plants | animals | animals | microorganisms | microorganisms | human history | human history | americas | americas | technology impact | technology impact | crisis | crisis | wilderness | wilderness | garden | garden | science | science | landscape | landscape | agriculture | agriculture | poison | poison | conservation | conservation | preservation | preservation | demography | demography | industry | industry

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.947 History and Theory of Historic Preservation (MIT)

Description

This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation, but is not an applied, technical course.

Subjects

history | theory of historic preservation | traditions and practices | historic preservation movement | laws | public policies and cultural attitudes | building conservation and restoration | urban studies and planning | architecture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Wardlaw-Smith Mansion The Wardlaw-Smith Mansion

Description

Subjects

florida | florida | madison | madison | restoration | restoration | preservation | preservation | mansions | mansions | contractors | contractors | antebellummansions | antebellummansions

License

No known copyright restrictions

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12.746 Marine Organic Geochemistry (MIT) 12.746 Marine Organic Geochemistry (MIT)

Description

This class is designed to provide the student with a global to molecular-level perspective of organic matter cycling in the oceans and marine sediments. Topics include: Organic matter (C,N,P) composition, reactivity and budgets within, and fluxes through, major ocean reservoirs; microbial recycling pathways for organic matter; models of organic matter degradation and preservation; role of anoxia in organic matter burial; relationships between dissolved and particulate (sinking and suspended) organic matter; methods for characterization of sedimentary organic matter; and application of biological markers as tools in oceanography. Both structural and isotopic aspects are covered. This class is designed to provide the student with a global to molecular-level perspective of organic matter cycling in the oceans and marine sediments. Topics include: Organic matter (C,N,P) composition, reactivity and budgets within, and fluxes through, major ocean reservoirs; microbial recycling pathways for organic matter; models of organic matter degradation and preservation; role of anoxia in organic matter burial; relationships between dissolved and particulate (sinking and suspended) organic matter; methods for characterization of sedimentary organic matter; and application of biological markers as tools in oceanography. Both structural and isotopic aspects are covered.

Subjects

Marine | Marine | organic geochemistry | organic geochemistry | distribution | distribution | organic carbon | organic carbon | marine sediments | marine sediments | global | global | molecular-level perspective | molecular-level perspective | mineralization | mineralization | preservation | preservation | OC | OC | major reservoirs | major reservoirs | microbial recycling pathways | microbial recycling pathways | degradation | degradation | anoxia | anoxia | OC burial | OC burial | dissolved | dissolved | sedimentary organic matter | sedimentary organic matter | biological markers | biological markers | oceanography | oceanography

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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12.491 Advanced Seminar in Geology and Geochemistry: Organic Geochemistry (MIT) 12.491 Advanced Seminar in Geology and Geochemistry: Organic Geochemistry (MIT)

Description

12.491 is a seminar focusing on problems of current interest in geology and geochemistry. For Fall 2005, the topic is organic geochemistry. Lectures and readings cover recent research in the development and properties of organic matter. 12.491 is a seminar focusing on problems of current interest in geology and geochemistry. For Fall 2005, the topic is organic geochemistry. Lectures and readings cover recent research in the development and properties of organic matter.

Subjects

organic geochemistry | organic geochemistry | formation of organic matter | formation of organic matter | geobiology | geobiology | biomarkers | biomarkers | biomarker | biomarker | physiology | physiology | phylogeny | phylogeny | preservation potential | preservation potential | diagenesis | diagenesis | kerogen formation | kerogen formation | hydrocarbon generation | hydrocarbon generation | paleoreconstruction | paleoreconstruction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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RJN0000PC0099

Description

Poor hygienic conditions in a butcher shop found during hygiene audits run as part of the official controls. Yennifher . Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Santo Tomas (www.santotomas.cl/ust/facultad/portada/r_naturales), Chile.

Subjects

foodsafety | foodhygiene | foodborne | meat | contamination | foodpreservation | chile | svmsvet | vph

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

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Nottingham Vet School | FlickR

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Victoria Bridge, Washington

Description

Subjects

trees | roof | chimney | plants | building | brick | window | water | glass | grass | leaves | river | design | town | washington | construction | support | pattern | crossing | transformation | path | timber | branches | memories | platform | bank | rail | structure | riverwear | pole | doorway | creation | planning | frame | cylinder | walls | changes | tranquil | 50thanniversary | preservation | sunderland | evolve | victoriabridge | pastandpresent | victoriaviaduct | blackandwhitephotograph | modernhousing | may1965 | socialheritage | washingtondevelopmentcorporation | washingtonnewtown

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Research Data Management Training Module 4: Finishing Touches

Description

At the end of a research project, the science is published and the data should be preserved. This final RDM module includes advice on where to publish the science outcomes and the supporting data as well as how to select the data, anonymise it, and choose the right archive for your data. Slides and training notes are included in this pack in one collection, but can be divided into four sections: publication, preserving data, anonymisation, and archiving data.

Subjects

rdm | research data management | jiscmrd | research training | research data management training | data preservation | publishing | archiving | RDMTrain | RDM Toolkit Project

License

Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

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http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

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RJN0000PC0086

Description

Meat drying in Dominican Republic. Food-borne diseases are a great concern, if not the greatest in health inspection. Despite this being a way of conservation (much like the drying of codfish) of the meat, it is prone to contamination by the lack of hygiene and lack of specific places for the practice. Afonso. Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar (ICBAS)(sigarra.up.pt/icbas/pt/uni_geral.unidade_view?pv_unidade=46) Porto, Portugal.

Subjects

foodsafety | foodhygiene | foodborne | meat | contamination | foodpreservation | dominicanrepublic | svmsvet | vph

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

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Nottingham Vet School | FlickR

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21H.421 Introduction to Environmental History (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides a historical overview of the interactions between people and their environments. Focusing primarily on the experience of Europeans in the period after Columbus, the subject explores the influence of nature (climate, topography, plants, animals, and microorganisms) on human history and the reciprocal influence of people on nature. Topics include the biological consequences of the European encounter with the Americas, the environmental impact of technology, and the roots of the current environmental crisis.

Subjects

environmental history | europe | columbus | climate | topography | nature | plants | animals | microorganisms | human history | americas | technology impact | crisis | wilderness | garden | science | landscape | agriculture | poison | conservation | preservation | demography | industry

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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RJN0000PC0099

Description

Poor hygienic conditions in a butcher shop found during hygiene audits run as part of the official controls. Yennifher . Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Santo Tomas (www.santotomas.cl/ust/facultad/portada/r_naturales), Chile.

Subjects

foodsafety | foodhygiene | foodborne | meat | contamination | foodpreservation | chile | svmsvet | vph

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

Site sourced from

Nottingham Vet School | FlickR

Attribution

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