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21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social and economic history. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their approaches. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social and economic history. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their approaches.

Subjects

history | history | theory | theory | method | method | contemporary | contemporary | twentieth century | twentieth century | social history | social history | economics | economics | primary source | primary source | narrative | narrative | analysis | analysis | cultural history | cultural history | 20th century | 20th century | Annales school | Annales school | agrarian history | agrarian history | class | class | race | race | gender | gender | historical categories | historical categories | historical demography | historical demography | new economic history | new economic history | military history | military history | environmental history | environmental history | film | film | Europe | Europe | America | America | Asia | Asia | primary sources | primary sources | 21H.991 | 21H.991 | STS.210 | STS.210

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21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT) 21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation. This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation.

Subjects

China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China | China | rice | rice | bowl | bowl | Chinese | Chinese | East Asia | East Asia | ordinary people | ordinary people | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century | personal narratives | personal narratives | primary sources | primary sources | films | films | textbook | textbook | individual | individual | family | family | lives | lives | change | change | modern | modern | readings | readings | discussions | discussions | political events | political events | daily | daily | decisions | decisions | large-scale | large-scale | social | social | transformation | transformation | 21F.191 | 21F.191 | 21F.991 | 21F.991

License

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21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social, economic and cultural history. We will examine how historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their various approaches. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social, economic and cultural history. We will examine how historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their various approaches.

Subjects

21H.991 | 21H.991 | STS.210 | STS.210 | History | History | theory | theory | Twentieth century | Twentieth century | social | social | economic | economic | cultural | cultural | primary sources | primary sources | narrative | narrative | methodology | methodology | social processes | social processes | ordinary people | ordinary people | collective mentalities | collective mentalities | structure | structure | material life | material life | obscure | obscure | oppressed | oppressed | poor | poor | Annales school | Annales school | conceptualization | conceptualization

License

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7.341 DNA Damage Checkpoints: The Emergency Brake on the Road to Cancer (MIT) 7.341 DNA Damage Checkpoints: The Emergency Brake on the Road to Cancer (MIT)

Description

The DNA contained in human cells is under constant attack by both exogenous and endogenous agents that can damage one of its three billion base pairs. To cope with this permanent exposure to DNA-damaging agents, such as the sun's radiation or by-products of our normal metabolism, powerful DNA damage checkpoints have evolved that allow organisms to survive this constant assault on their genomes. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understanding of checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. We will consider basic principles of cell proliferation and molecular details of the DNA damage response. We will discuss the methods and model organisms typically used in this field as well as how an The DNA contained in human cells is under constant attack by both exogenous and endogenous agents that can damage one of its three billion base pairs. To cope with this permanent exposure to DNA-damaging agents, such as the sun's radiation or by-products of our normal metabolism, powerful DNA damage checkpoints have evolved that allow organisms to survive this constant assault on their genomes. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understanding of checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. We will consider basic principles of cell proliferation and molecular details of the DNA damage response. We will discuss the methods and model organisms typically used in this field as well as how an

Subjects

DNA | DNA | damage checkpoints | damage checkpoints | cancer | cancer | cells | cells | human cells | human cells | exogenous | exogenous | endogenous | endogenous | checkpoints | checkpoints | gene | gene | signaling | signaling | cancer biology | cancer biology | cancer prevention | cancer prevention | primary sources | primary sources | discussion | discussion | DNA damage | DNA damage | molecular | molecular | enzyme | enzyme | cell cycle | cell cycle | extracellular cues | extracellular cues | growth factors | growth factors | Cdk regulation | Cdk regulation | cyclin-dependent kinase | cyclin-dependent kinase | p53 | p53 | tumor suppressor | tumor suppressor | apoptosis | apoptosis | MDC1 | MDC1 | H2AX | H2AX | Rad50 | Rad50 | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Chk1 | Chk1 | mutant | mutant

License

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9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT) 9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

This course begins with the study of nerve cells which includes their structure, the propagation of nerve impulses and transfer of information between nerve cells, the effect of drugs on this process, and the development of nerve cells into the brain and spinal cord. Next, sensory systems such as hearing, vision and touch are covered as well as a discussion on how physical energy such as light is converted into neural signals, where these signals travel in the brain and how they are processed. Other topics include the control of voluntary movement, the neurochemical bases of brain diseases, and those systems which control sleep and consciousness, learning and memory. This course begins with the study of nerve cells which includes their structure, the propagation of nerve impulses and transfer of information between nerve cells, the effect of drugs on this process, and the development of nerve cells into the brain and spinal cord. Next, sensory systems such as hearing, vision and touch are covered as well as a discussion on how physical energy such as light is converted into neural signals, where these signals travel in the brain and how they are processed. Other topics include the control of voluntary movement, the neurochemical bases of brain diseases, and those systems which control sleep and consciousness, learning and memory.

Subjects

neuroscience | neuroscience | vision | vision | hearing | hearing | neuroanatomy | neuroanatomy | color vision | color vision | blind spot | blind spot | retinal phototransduction | retinal phototransduction | center-surround receptive fields | center-surround receptive fields | corticalmaps | corticalmaps | primary visual cortex | primary visual cortex | simple cells | simple cells | complex cells | complex cells | extrastriate cortex | extrastriate cortex | ear | ear | cochlea | cochlea | basilar membrane | basilar membrane | auditory transduction | auditory transduction | hair cells | hair cells | phase-locking | phase-locking | tonotopy | tonotopy | sound localization | sound localization | auditory cortex | auditory cortex | somatosensory system | somatosensory system | motor system | motor system | synaptic transmission | synaptic transmission | action potential | action potential | sympathetic neurons | sympathetic neurons | parasympathetic neurons | parasympathetic neurons | cellual neurophysiology | cellual neurophysiology | learning | learning | memory | memory

License

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Design (MIT) Design (MIT)

Description

This course is intended for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates with an interest in design of ships or offshore structures. It requires a sufficient background in structural mechanics. Computer applications are utilized, with emphasis on the theory underlying the analysis. Hydrostatic loading, shear load and bending moment, and resulting primary hull primary stresses will be developed. Topics will include; ship structural design concepts, effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength, transverse shear stresses in the hull girder, and torsional strength among others. Failure mechanisms and design limit states will be developed for plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, grillage, This course is intended for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates with an interest in design of ships or offshore structures. It requires a sufficient background in structural mechanics. Computer applications are utilized, with emphasis on the theory underlying the analysis. Hydrostatic loading, shear load and bending moment, and resulting primary hull primary stresses will be developed. Topics will include; ship structural design concepts, effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength, transverse shear stresses in the hull girder, and torsional strength among others. Failure mechanisms and design limit states will be developed for plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, grillage,

Subjects

ships | ships | offshore structures | offshore structures | structural mechanics | structural mechanics | Hydrostatic loading | Hydrostatic loading | shear load | shear load | bending moment | bending moment | ship structural design concepts | ship structural design concepts | superstructures | superstructures | primary strength | primary strength | transverse shear stresses | transverse shear stresses | torsional strength | torsional strength | Failure mechanisms | Failure mechanisms | design limit states | design limit states | plastic analysis | plastic analysis | Matrix stiffness | Matrix stiffness | grillage | grillage | finite element analysis | finite element analysis | 2.082 | 2.082

License

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ón Física en Primaria (I) y Educación Física en Primaria (II) (2011) ón Física en Primaria (I) y Educación Física en Primaria (II) (2011)

Description

El desarrollo integral del ser humano conlleva ineludiblemente la inclusión en la formación de los jóvenes de aquellas enseñanzas que van a potenciar el desarrollo de sus conductas motrices, profundizando en el conocimiento de esa conducta como organización significante del comportamiento humano y asumiendo actitudes, valores y normas con referencia al cuerpo y sus movimientos. La escasa actividad motriz desplegada en el actual sistema de vida conduce a que cada vez adquieran mayor importancia las actividades físicas como medio de equilibrio psicofísico y de ocupación del tiempo libre. La sociedad actual plantea la necesidad de incorporar a la educación aquellos conocimientos, destrezas y capacidades relacionados con el cuerpo y su actividad motriz que contribuyen al desarrollo El desarrollo integral del ser humano conlleva ineludiblemente la inclusión en la formación de los jóvenes de aquellas enseñanzas que van a potenciar el desarrollo de sus conductas motrices, profundizando en el conocimiento de esa conducta como organización significante del comportamiento humano y asumiendo actitudes, valores y normas con referencia al cuerpo y sus movimientos. La escasa actividad motriz desplegada en el actual sistema de vida conduce a que cada vez adquieran mayor importancia las actividades físicas como medio de equilibrio psicofísico y de ocupación del tiempo libre. La sociedad actual plantea la necesidad de incorporar a la educación aquellos conocimientos, destrezas y capacidades relacionados con el cuerpo y su actividad motriz que contribuyen al desarrollo

Subjects

primary education | primary education | elementary schoolchildren | elementary schoolchildren | physical activity | physical activity | learning | learning | ísica | ísica | primaria | primaria | ón Física | ón Física | ñanza | ñanza | áctica de la Expresión Corporal | áctica de la Expresión Corporal | school | school | higher education | higher education | deporte | deporte | ñanza superior | ñanza superior | teaching | teaching | escolares | escolares | sport | sport | Physical Education | Physical Education | escuela | escuela

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology (MIT) 7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Biology focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. These principles are necessary to understanding the basic mechanisms of life and anchor the biological knowledge that is required to understand many of the challenges in everyday life, from human health and disease to loss of biodiversity and environmental quality. Fundamentals of Biology focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. These principles are necessary to understanding the basic mechanisms of life and anchor the biological knowledge that is required to understand many of the challenges in everyday life, from human health and disease to loss of biodiversity and environmental quality.

Subjects

amino acids | amino acids | carboxyl group | carboxyl group | amino group | amino group | side chains | side chains | polar | polar | hydrophobic | hydrophobic | primary structure | primary structure | secondary structure | secondary structure | tertiary structure | tertiary structure | quaternary structure | quaternary structure | x-ray crystallography | x-ray crystallography | alpha helix | alpha helix | beta sheet | beta sheet | ionic bond | ionic bond | non-polar bond | non-polar bond | van der Waals interactions | van der Waals interactions | proton gradient | proton gradient | cyclic photophosphorylation | cyclic photophosphorylation | sunlight | sunlight | ATP | ATP | chlorophyll | chlorophyll | chlorophyll a | chlorophyll a | electrons | electrons | hydrogen sulfide | hydrogen sulfide | biosynthesis | biosynthesis | non-cyclic photophosphorylation | non-cyclic photophosphorylation | photosystem II | photosystem II | photosystem I | photosystem I | cyanobacteria | cyanobacteria | chloroplast | chloroplast | stroma | stroma | thylakoid membrane | thylakoid membrane | Genetics | Genetics | Mendel | Mendel | Mendel's Laws | Mendel's Laws | cloning | cloning | restriction enzymes | restriction enzymes | vector | vector | insert DNA | insert DNA | ligase | ligase | library | library | E.Coli | E.Coli | phosphatase | phosphatase | yeast | yeast | transformation | transformation | ARG1 gene | ARG1 gene | ARG1 mutant yeast | ARG1 mutant yeast | yeast wild-type | yeast wild-type | cloning by complementation | cloning by complementation | Human Beta Globin gene | Human Beta Globin gene | protein tetramer | protein tetramer | vectors | vectors | antibodies | antibodies | human promoter | human promoter | splicing | splicing | mRNA | mRNA | cDNA | cDNA | reverse transcriptase | reverse transcriptase | plasmid | plasmid | electrophoresis | electrophoresis | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | primer | primer | template | template | capillary tube | capillary tube | laser detector | laser detector | human genome project | human genome project | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | clone | clone | primer walking | primer walking | subcloning | subcloning | computer assembly | computer assembly | shotgun sequencing | shotgun sequencing | open reading frame | open reading frame | databases | databases | polymerase chain reaction (PCR) | polymerase chain reaction (PCR) | polymerase | polymerase | nucleotides | nucleotides | Thermus aquaticus | Thermus aquaticus | Taq polymerase | Taq polymerase | thermocycler | thermocycler | resequencing | resequencing | in vitro fertilization | in vitro fertilization | pre-implantation diagnostics | pre-implantation diagnostics | forensics | forensics | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | DNA sequences | DNA sequences | therapeutic proteins | therapeutic proteins | E. coli | E. coli | disease-causing mutations | disease-causing mutations | cleavage of DNA | cleavage of DNA | bacterial transformation | bacterial transformation | recombinant DNA revolution | recombinant DNA revolution | biotechnology industry | biotechnology industry | Robert Swanson | Robert Swanson | toxin gene | toxin gene | pathogenic bacterium | pathogenic bacterium | biomedical research | biomedical research | S. Pyogenes | S. Pyogenes | origin of replication | origin of replication

License

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Design (13.122) (MIT) Design (13.122) (MIT)

Description

This course is intended for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates with an interest in design of ships or offshore structures. It requires a sufficient background in structural mechanics. Computer applications are utilized, with emphasis on the theory underlying the analysis. Hydrostatic loading, shear load and bending moment, and resulting primary hull primary stresses will be developed. Topics will include; ship structural design concepts, effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength, transverse shear stresses in the hull girder, and torsional strength among others. Failure mechanisms and design limit states will be developed for plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, grillage, This course is intended for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates with an interest in design of ships or offshore structures. It requires a sufficient background in structural mechanics. Computer applications are utilized, with emphasis on the theory underlying the analysis. Hydrostatic loading, shear load and bending moment, and resulting primary hull primary stresses will be developed. Topics will include; ship structural design concepts, effect of superstructures and dissimilar materials on primary strength, transverse shear stresses in the hull girder, and torsional strength among others. Failure mechanisms and design limit states will be developed for plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, grillage,

Subjects

ships | ships | offshore structures | offshore structures | structural mechanics | structural mechanics | Hydrostatic loading | Hydrostatic loading | shear load | shear load | bending moment | bending moment | ship structural design concepts | ship structural design concepts | superstructures | superstructures | primary strength | primary strength | transverse shear stresses | transverse shear stresses | torsional strength | torsional strength | Failure mechanisms | Failure mechanisms | design limit states | design limit states | plastic analysis | plastic analysis | Matrix stiffness | Matrix stiffness | grillage | grillage | finite element analysis | finite element analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.341 The DNA Damage Response as a Target for Anti-Cancer Therapy (MIT) 7.341 The DNA Damage Response as a Target for Anti-Cancer Therapy (MIT)

Description

Cellular responses to DNA damage constitute one of the most important fields in cancer biology. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understand of cell cycle regulation and DNA damage checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching. Cellular responses to DNA damage constitute one of the most important fields in cancer biology. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understand of cell cycle regulation and DNA damage checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

DNA | DNA | damage checkpoints | damage checkpoints | cancer | cancer | cells | cells | human cells | human cells | exogenous | exogenous | endogenous | endogenous | checkpoints | checkpoints | gene | gene | signaling | signaling | cancer biology | cancer biology | cancer prevention | cancer prevention | primary sources | primary sources | discussion | discussion | DNA damage | DNA damage | molecular | molecular | enzyme | enzyme | cell cycle | cell cycle | extracellular cues | extracellular cues | growth factors | growth factors | Cdk regulation | Cdk regulation | cyclin-dependent kinase | cyclin-dependent kinase | p53 | p53 | tumor suppressor | tumor suppressor | apoptosis | apoptosis | MDC1 | MDC1 | H2AX | H2AX | Rad50 | Rad50 | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Chk1 | Chk1 | mutant | mutant

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.18 Topics in Experimental Biology (MIT) 7.18 Topics in Experimental Biology (MIT)

Description

This independent experimental study course is designed to allow students with a strong interest in independent research to fulfill the project laboratory requirement for the Biology Department Program in the context of a research laboratory at MIT. The research should be a continuation of a previous project under the direction of a member of the Biology Department faculty. This course provides instruction and practice in written and oral communication. Journal club discussions are used to help students evaluate and write scientific papers. This independent experimental study course is designed to allow students with a strong interest in independent research to fulfill the project laboratory requirement for the Biology Department Program in the context of a research laboratory at MIT. The research should be a continuation of a previous project under the direction of a member of the Biology Department faculty. This course provides instruction and practice in written and oral communication. Journal club discussions are used to help students evaluate and write scientific papers.

Subjects

experimental biology | experimental biology | journal club | journal club | primary literature | primary literature | scientific research | scientific research | oral presentations | oral presentations | communication | communication | abstracts | abstracts | materials and methods | materials and methods | discussion | discussion | IMRAD | IMRAD | research report | research report | laboratory research | laboratory research | results section | results section

License

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9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT) 9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the mammalian nervous system, with emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain. Topics include the function of nerve cells, sensory systems, control of movement, learning and memory, and diseases of the brain. This course is an introduction to the mammalian nervous system, with emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain. Topics include the function of nerve cells, sensory systems, control of movement, learning and memory, and diseases of the brain.

Subjects

neuroscience | neuroscience | vision | vision | hearing | hearing | neuroanatomy | neuroanatomy | color vision | color vision | blind spot | blind spot | retinal phototransduction | retinal phototransduction | cortical maps | cortical maps | primary visual cortex | primary visual cortex | complex cells | complex cells | extrastriate cortex | extrastriate cortex | ear | ear | cochlea | cochlea | basilar membrane | basilar membrane | auditory transduction | auditory transduction | hair cells | hair cells | phase-locking | phase-locking | sound localization | sound localization | auditory cortex | auditory cortex | somatosensory system | somatosensory system | motor system | motor system | synaptic transmission | synaptic transmission | action potential | action potential | sympathetic neurons | sympathetic neurons | parasympathetic neurons | parasympathetic neurons | cellual neurophysiology | cellual neurophysiology | learning | learning | memory | memory

License

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21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches. We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | women's studies | women's studies | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework

License

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21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT) 21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation. This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | History | Rome | Rome | ancient | ancient | world | world | origins | origins | fifth century A.D. | fifth century A.D. | Kingship | Kingship | Republican form | Republican form | conquest | conquest | Italy | Italy | Roman expansion | Roman expansion | Pyrrhus | Pyrrhus | Punic Wars | Punic Wars | classes | classes | courts | courts | Roman revolution | Roman revolution | Augustus | Augustus | empire | empire | Virgil | Virgil | Vandals | Vandals | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | religious | religious | trends | trends | provinces | provinces | primary sources | primary sources | translation | translation

License

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21H.301 The Ancient World: Greece (MIT) 21H.301 The Ancient World: Greece (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander. It covers major social, economic, political, and religious trends. It also includes discussions on Homer, heroism, and the Greek identity; the hoplite revolution and the rise of the city-state; Herodotus, Persia, and the (re)birth of history; Empire, Thucydidean rationalism, and the Peloponnesian War; Platonic constructs; Aristotle, Macedonia, and Hellenism. Emphasis is on use of primary sources in translation. This course elaborates the history of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander. It covers major social, economic, political, and religious trends. It also includes discussions on Homer, heroism, and the Greek identity; the hoplite revolution and the rise of the city-state; Herodotus, Persia, and the (re)birth of history; Empire, Thucydidean rationalism, and the Peloponnesian War; Platonic constructs; Aristotle, Macedonia, and Hellenism. Emphasis is on use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | History | Ancient | Ancient | Greece | Greece | Bronze Age | Bronze Age | death | death | Alexander | Alexander | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | religious | religious | trends | trends | Homer | Homer | heroism | heroism | Greek | Greek | identity | identity | hoplite revolution | hoplite revolution | city-state | city-state | Herodotus | Herodotus | Persia | Persia | Empire | Empire | Thucydidean rationalism | Thucydidean rationalism | Peloponnesian War | Peloponnesian War | Platonic constructs | Platonic constructs | Aristotle | Aristotle | Macedonia | Macedonia | Hellenism | Hellenism | primary sources | primary sources | translation. | translation.

License

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21H.615 The Middle East in 20th Century (MIT) 21H.615 The Middle East in 20th Century (MIT)

Description

This course explores the 20th-century history of the Middle East, concentrating on the Fertile Crescent, Egypt, Turkey, the Arabian peninsula, and Iran. We will begin by examining the late Ottoman Empire and close with the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Readings will include historical surveys, novels, and primary source documents. This course explores the 20th-century history of the Middle East, concentrating on the Fertile Crescent, Egypt, Turkey, the Arabian peninsula, and Iran. We will begin by examining the late Ottoman Empire and close with the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Readings will include historical surveys, novels, and primary source documents.

Subjects

20th-century history | 20th-century history | Middle East | Middle East | Fertile Crescent | Fertile Crescent | Egypt | Egypt | Turkey | Turkey | Arabian peninsula | Arabian peninsula | Iran | Iran | Ottoman Empire | Ottoman Empire | 9/11 | 9/11 | historical surveys | historical surveys | novels | novels | primary source documents | primary source documents

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT) 21H.302 The Ancient World: Rome (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation. This course elaborates the history of Rome from its humble beginnings to the fifth century A.D. The first half of the course covers Kingship to Republican form; the conquest of Italy; Roman expansion: Pyrrhus, Punic Wars and provinces; classes, courts, and the Roman revolution; Augustus and the formation of empire. The second half of the course covers Virgil to the Vandals; major social, economic, political and religious trends at Rome and in the provinces. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources in translation.

Subjects

History | History | Rome | Rome | ancient | ancient | world | world | origins | origins | fifth century A.D. | fifth century A.D. | Kingship | Kingship | Republican form | Republican form | conquest | conquest | Italy | Italy | Roman expansion | Roman expansion | Pyrrhus | Pyrrhus | Punic Wars | Punic Wars | classes | classes | courts | courts | Roman revolution | Roman revolution | Augustus | Augustus | empire | empire | Virgil | Virgil | Vandals | Vandals | social | social | economic | economic | political | political | religious | religious | trends | trends | provinces | provinces | primary sources | primary sources | translation | translation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.2 Problems with Resemblance

Description

Part 6.2. Explores Berkeley's and Locke's arguments concerning the resemblance of qualities and objects; that the perceived qualities of objects exist only in the mind or whether secondary qualities are intrinsically part of the object. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

secondary qualities | perception | locke | philosophy | ideas | primary qualities | berkeley | secondary qualities | perception | locke | philosophy | ideas | primary qualities | berkeley

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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6.2 Problems with Resemblance

Description

Part 6.2. Explores Berkeley's and Locke's arguments concerning the resemblance of qualities and objects; that the perceived qualities of objects exist only in the mind or whether secondary qualities are intrinsically part of the object. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

secondary qualities | perception | locke | philosophy | ideas | primary qualities | berkeley | secondary qualities | perception | locke | philosophy | ideas | primary qualities | berkeley

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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20.320 Analysis of Biomolecular and Cellular Systems (MIT) 20.320 Analysis of Biomolecular and Cellular Systems (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on computational and experimental analysis of biological systems across a hierarchy of scales, including genetic, molecular, cellular, and cell population levels. The two central themes of the course are modeling of complex dynamic systems and protein design and engineering. Topics include gene sequence analysis, molecular modeling, metabolic and gene regulation networks, signal transduction pathways and cell populations in tissues. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling. This course focuses on computational and experimental analysis of biological systems across a hierarchy of scales, including genetic, molecular, cellular, and cell population levels. The two central themes of the course are modeling of complex dynamic systems and protein design and engineering. Topics include gene sequence analysis, molecular modeling, metabolic and gene regulation networks, signal transduction pathways and cell populations in tissues. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling.

Subjects

biological engineering | biological engineering | kinase | kinase | PyMOL | PyMOL | PyRosetta | PyRosetta | MATLAB | MATLAB | Michaelis-Menten | Michaelis-Menten | bioreactor | bioreactor | bromodomain | bromodomain | protein-ligand interactions | protein-ligand interactions | titration analysis | titration analysis | fractional separation | fractional separation | isothermal titration calorimetry | isothermal titration calorimetry | ITC | ITC | mass spectrometry | mass spectrometry | MS | MS | co-immunoprecipitation | co-immunoprecipitation | Co-IP | Co-IP | Forster resonance energy transfer | Forster resonance energy transfer | FRET | FRET | primary ligation assay | primary ligation assay | PLA | PLA | surface plasmon resonance | surface plasmon resonance | SPR | SPR | enzyme kinetics | enzyme kinetics | kinase engineering | kinase engineering | competitive inhibition | competitive inhibition | epidermal growth factor receptor | epidermal growth factor receptor | mitogen-activated protein kinase | mitogen-activated protein kinase | MAPK | MAPK | genome editing | genome editing | Imatinib | Imatinib | Gleevec | Gleevec | Glivec | Glivec | drug delivery | drug delivery | kinetics of molecular processes | kinetics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | intracellular scale | intracellular scale | extracellular scale | extracellular scale | and cell population scale | and cell population scale | biotechnology applications | biotechnology applications | gene regulation networks | gene regulation networks | nucleic acid hybridization | nucleic acid hybridization | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in bioreactors | cell populations in bioreactors | experimental methods | experimental methods | quantitative analysis | quantitative analysis | computational modeling | computational modeling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.267 Democracy in America (MIT) 17.267 Democracy in America (MIT)

Description

This course examines the functioning of democracy in the U.S. beginning with the theoretical foundations of democratic representation. It explores how the views of the public influence policy making. It also examines factors, such as malapportionment, that lead to non-majoritarian outcomes. Evidence on how well policy outcomes reflect public opinion is reviewed, and whether certain groups are over or under-represented in the policy process. Also discussed are reforms that might make our democracy more responsive to the American public. This course examines the functioning of democracy in the U.S. beginning with the theoretical foundations of democratic representation. It explores how the views of the public influence policy making. It also examines factors, such as malapportionment, that lead to non-majoritarian outcomes. Evidence on how well policy outcomes reflect public opinion is reviewed, and whether certain groups are over or under-represented in the policy process. Also discussed are reforms that might make our democracy more responsive to the American public.

Subjects

democratic representation | democratic representation | public opinion | public opinion | malapportionment | malapportionment | institutional reform | institutional reform | non-majoritarian policy | non-majoritarian policy | meidan voter | meidan voter | electoral accountability | electoral accountability | primary constituencies | primary constituencies | elites | elites | voter turnout | voter turnout | interest groups | interest groups | incumbency bias | incumbency bias | one-person | one-vote | one-person | one-vote | term limits | term limits | udges | udges | redistricting | redistricting | campaign finance | campaign finance | convenience voting | convenience voting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history. This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework | agrarian history | agrarian history | historical demography | historical demography | European history | European history | American history | American history | Asian history | Asian history | maps | maps | African history | African history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.460 Histories of Information, Communication, and Computing Technologies (MIT) STS.460 Histories of Information, Communication, and Computing Technologies (MIT)

Description

The histories of information, communication, and computing technologies have attracted attention from scholars across a variety of disciplines. This course introduces students to prominent voices in these topics across fields. Alongside readings introducing students to this broad scholarly terrain, the course offers guidance in research and writing for publication based on the reality that PhD candidates on the job market need to be published authors, and that every term paper has the potential to be a journal article. We work towards publication by reading widely-cited scholarly histories both for their content and for what they can tell us about scholarly craft. The histories of information, communication, and computing technologies have attracted attention from scholars across a variety of disciplines. This course introduces students to prominent voices in these topics across fields. Alongside readings introducing students to this broad scholarly terrain, the course offers guidance in research and writing for publication based on the reality that PhD candidates on the job market need to be published authors, and that every term paper has the potential to be a journal article. We work towards publication by reading widely-cited scholarly histories both for their content and for what they can tell us about scholarly craft.

Subjects

history | history | information | information | communication | communication | computing | computing | technology | technology | ICT | ICT | military | military | intelligence agency | intelligence agency | business | business | government | government | entertainment | entertainment | cultural history | cultural history | proto-ICT | proto-ICT | dissertation | dissertation | metanarrative | metanarrative | monograph | monograph | secondary sources | secondary sources | primary sources | primary sources | knowledge | knowledge | publishing | publishing

License

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Bird's Eye View, Lurgan, Co. Armagh Bird's Eye View, Lurgan, Co. Armagh

Description

Subjects

chimney | chimney | spire | spire | 20thcentury | 20thcentury | eason | eason | birdseye | birdseye | ulster | ulster | gasholder | gasholder | glassnegative | glassnegative | gasometers | gasometers | lurgan | lurgan | stpeterscatholicchurch | stpeterscatholicchurch | countyarmagh | countyarmagh | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | labourexchange | labourexchange | shakill | shakill | ricbarracks | ricbarracks | shankillparishchurch | shankillparishchurch | easonson | easonson | easoncollection | easoncollection | josephherbert | josephherbert | lurganmodelprimaryschool | lurganmodelprimaryschool | easonphotographiccollection | easonphotographiccollection

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Maryborough outbreak of Primary Pneumonic Plague (May-June, 1905) Maryborough outbreak of Primary Pneumonic Plague (May-June, 1905)

Description

Subjects

slq | slq | queensland | queensland | plague | plague | statelibraryofqueensland | statelibraryofqueensland | maryborough | maryborough | primarypneumonicplague | primarypneumonicplague | drburnettham | drburnettham | nurses | nurses

License

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