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9.59J Psycholinguistics (MIT) 9.59J Psycholinguistics (MIT)

Description

Central topics in language processing. The structure of language. Sentence processing. Discourse processing. Morphological processing. The storage and access of words in the mental dictionary. Speech processing. The relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism. Ambiguity resolution. Discussion of computational modeling, including connectionist models. The relationship between language and thought. Issues in language acquisition including critical period phenomena, the acquisition of speech, and the acquisition of words. Experimental methodologies such as self-paced reading, eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and neural imaging methods. Central topics in language processing. The structure of language. Sentence processing. Discourse processing. Morphological processing. The storage and access of words in the mental dictionary. Speech processing. The relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism. Ambiguity resolution. Discussion of computational modeling, including connectionist models. The relationship between language and thought. Issues in language acquisition including critical period phenomena, the acquisition of speech, and the acquisition of words. Experimental methodologies such as self-paced reading, eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and neural imaging methods.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | Language | Language | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | storage | storage | access | access | Speech processing | Speech processing | computation | computation | Ambiguity | Ambiguity | connectionist models | connectionist models | thought | thought | acquisition | acquisition | critical period phenomena | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | word acquisition | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods. | neural imaging methods. | 9.59 | 9.59 | 24.905 | 24.905

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9.591J Language Processing (MIT) 9.591J Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations. This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | language | language | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | storage | storage | access | access | Speech processing | Speech processing | computation | computation | Ambiguity | Ambiguity | connectionist models | connectionist models | thought | thought | acquisition | acquisition | critical period phenomena | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | word acquisition | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods | neural imaging methods | 9.591 | 9.591 | 24.945 | 24.945

License

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9.591J Language Processing (MIT) 9.591J Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations. This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | language | language | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | storage | storage | access | access | Speech processing | Speech processing | computation | computation | Ambiguity | Ambiguity | connectionist models | connectionist models | thought | thought | acquisition | acquisition | critical period phenomena | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | word acquisition | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods | neural imaging methods | 9.591 | 9.591 | 24.945 | 24.945

License

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT) 9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports. Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | structure | structure | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | storage | storage | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | Ambiguity resolution | Ambiguity resolution | computational modeling | computational modeling | connectionist models | connectionist models | critical period | critical period | Speech acquisition | Speech acquisition | word acquisition | word acquisition | self-paced reading | self-paced reading | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | maging | maging | language acquisition | language acquisition

License

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT) 9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports. Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

language processing | language processing | structure | structure | Sentence processing | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Discourse processing | storage | storage | Morphological processing | Morphological processing | Ambiguity resolution | Ambiguity resolution | computational modeling | computational modeling | connectionist models | connectionist models | critical period | critical period | Speech acquisition | Speech acquisition | word acquisition | word acquisition | self-paced reading | self-paced reading | eye-tracking | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | cross-modal priming | maging | maging | language acquisition | language acquisition

License

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6.152J Microelectronics Processing Technology (MIT) 6.152J Microelectronics Processing Technology (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the theory and technology of micro/nano fabrication. Lectures and laboratory sessions focus on basic processing techniques such as diffusion, oxidation, photolithography, chemical vapor deposition, and more. Through team lab assignments, students are expected to gain an understanding of these processing techniques, and how they are applied in concert to device fabrication. Students enrolled in this course have a unique opportunity to fashion and test micro/nano-devices, using modern techniques and technology. This course introduces the theory and technology of micro/nano fabrication. Lectures and laboratory sessions focus on basic processing techniques such as diffusion, oxidation, photolithography, chemical vapor deposition, and more. Through team lab assignments, students are expected to gain an understanding of these processing techniques, and how they are applied in concert to device fabrication. Students enrolled in this course have a unique opportunity to fashion and test micro/nano-devices, using modern techniques and technology.

Subjects

microelectronics | microelectronics | Microelectronics processing | Microelectronics processing | integrated circuits | vacuum | chemical vapor deposition | CVD | oxidation | diffusion | implantation | lithography | soft lithography | etching | sputtering | evaporation | interconnect | metallization | crystal growth | reliability | fabrication | processing | photolithography | physical vapor deposition | MOS | MOS capacitor | microcantilever | microfluidic | integrated circuits | vacuum | chemical vapor deposition | CVD | oxidation | diffusion | implantation | lithography | soft lithography | etching | sputtering | evaporation | interconnect | metallization | crystal growth | reliability | fabrication | processing | photolithography | physical vapor deposition | MOS | MOS capacitor | microcantilever | microfluidic | integrated circuits;vacuum;chemical vapor deposition;CVD;oxidation;diffusion;implantation;lithography;soft lithography;etching;sputtering;evaporation;interconnect;metallization;crystal growth;reliability;fabrication;processing;photolithography;physical vapor deposition;MOS;MOS capacitor;microcantilever;microfluidic | integrated circuits;vacuum;chemical vapor deposition;CVD;oxidation;diffusion;implantation;lithography;soft lithography;etching;sputtering;evaporation;interconnect;metallization;crystal growth;reliability;fabrication;processing;photolithography;physical vapor deposition;MOS;MOS capacitor;microcantilever;microfluidic | integrated circuits | integrated circuits | vacuum | vacuum | chemical vapor deposition | chemical vapor deposition | CVD | CVD | oxidation | oxidation | diffusion | diffusion | implantation | implantation | lithography | lithography | soft lithography | soft lithography | etching | etching | sputtering | sputtering | evaporation | evaporation | interconnect | interconnect | metallization | metallization | crystal growth | crystal growth | reliability | reliability | fabrication | fabrication | processing | processing | photolithography | photolithography | physical vapor deposition | physical vapor deposition | MOS | MOS | MOS capacitor | MOS capacitor | microcantilever | microcantilever | microfluidic | microfluidic | 6.152 | 6.152 | 3.155 | 3.155

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3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT) 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more. As its name implies, the 3.042 Materials Project Laboratory involves working with such operations as investment casting of metals, injection molding of polymers, and sintering of ceramics. After all the abstraction and theory in the lecture part of the DMSE curriculum, many students have found this hands-on experience with materials to be very fun stuff - several have said that 3.042/3.082 was their favorite DMSE subject. The lab is more than operating processing equipment, however. It is intended also to emulate professional practice in materials engineering project management, with aspects of design, analysis, teamwork, literature and patent searching, Web creation and oral presentation, and more.

Subjects

Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | Student project teams design and fabricate a materials engineering prototype using processing technologies (injection molding | thermoforming | thermoforming | investment casting | investment casting | powder processing | powder processing | three-dimensional printing | three-dimensional printing | physical vapor deposition | physical vapor deposition | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | etc.) appropriate for the materials and device of interest. Goals include using MSE fundamentals in a practical application; understanding trade-offs between design | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | processing and performance; and fabrication of a deliverable prototype. Emphasis on teamwork | project management | project management | communications and computer skills | communications and computer skills | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided. | and hands-on work using student and MIT laboratory shops. Teams document their progress and final results by means of web pages and weekly oral presentations. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided.

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6.003 Signals and Systems (MIT) 6.003 Signals and Systems (MIT)

Description

This course covers fundamentals of signal and system analysis, with applications drawn from filtering, audio and image processing, communications, and automatic control. Topics include convolution, Fourier series and transforms, sampling and discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals, modulation, Laplace and Z-transforms, and feedback systems. This course covers fundamentals of signal and system analysis, with applications drawn from filtering, audio and image processing, communications, and automatic control. Topics include convolution, Fourier series and transforms, sampling and discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals, modulation, Laplace and Z-transforms, and feedback systems.

Subjects

signal and system analysis | signal and system analysis | filtering | filtering | audio | audio | audio processing | audio processing | image processing | image processing | communications | communications | automatic control | automatic control | convolution | convolution | Fourier series | Fourier series | fourier transforms | fourier transforms | sampling | sampling | discrete-time processing | discrete-time processing | modulation | modulation | Laplace transforms | Laplace transforms | Z-transforms | Z-transforms | feedback systems | feedback systems

License

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6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT) 6.864 Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject. This course is a graduate introduction to natural language processing - the study of human language from a computational perspective. It covers syntactic, semantic and discourse processing models, emphasizing machine learning or corpus-based methods and algorithms. It also covers applications of these methods and models in syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, dialogue systems, and summarization. The subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

NLP | NLP | voice processing | voice processing | voice response | voice response | speech recognition | speech recognition | linguistics | linguistics | translation | translation | machine learning | machine learning | speech processing | speech processing | parsing | parsing | syntax | syntax | language model | language model | dialogue | dialogue | comprehension | comprehension | understanding | understanding | lexicon | lexicon | lexical | lexical | text processing | text processing | speech generation | speech generation

License

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9.591J Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations.

Subjects

language processing | language | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | storage | access | Speech processing | computation | Ambiguity | connectionist models | thought | acquisition | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods | 9.591 | 24.945

License

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9.59J Psycholinguistics (MIT)

Description

Central topics in language processing. The structure of language. Sentence processing. Discourse processing. Morphological processing. The storage and access of words in the mental dictionary. Speech processing. The relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism. Ambiguity resolution. Discussion of computational modeling, including connectionist models. The relationship between language and thought. Issues in language acquisition including critical period phenomena, the acquisition of speech, and the acquisition of words. Experimental methodologies such as self-paced reading, eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and neural imaging methods.

Subjects

language processing | Language | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | storage | access | Speech processing | computation | Ambiguity | connectionist models | thought | acquisition | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods. | 9.59 | 24.905

License

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9.591J Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations.

Subjects

language processing | language | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | storage | access | Speech processing | computation | Ambiguity | connectionist models | thought | acquisition | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods | 9.591 | 24.945

License

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9.591J Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations.

Subjects

language processing | language | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | storage | access | Speech processing | computation | Ambiguity | connectionist models | thought | acquisition | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods | 9.591 | 24.945

License

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9.591J Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a seminar in real-time language comprehension. It considers models of sentence and discourse comprehension from the linguistic, psychology, and artificial intelligence literature, including symbolic and connectionist models. Topics include ambiguity resolution and linguistic complexity; the use of lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, contextual and prosodic information in language comprehension; the relationship between the computational resources available in working memory and the language processing mechanism; and the psychological reality of linguistic representations.

Subjects

language processing | language | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | Morphological processing | storage | access | Speech processing | computation | Ambiguity | connectionist models | thought | acquisition | critical period phenomena | acquisition of speech | word acquisition | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | neural imaging methods | 9.591 | 24.945

License

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6.152J Microelectronics Processing Technology (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the theory and technology of micro/nano fabrication. Lectures and laboratory sessions focus on basic processing techniques such as diffusion, oxidation, photolithography, chemical vapor deposition, and more. Through team lab assignments, students are expected to gain an understanding of these processing techniques, and how they are applied in concert to device fabrication. Students enrolled in this course have a unique opportunity to fashion and test micro/nano-devices, using modern techniques and technology.

Subjects

microelectronics | Microelectronics processing | integrated circuits | vacuum | chemical vapor deposition | CVD | oxidation | diffusion | implantation | lithography | soft lithography | etching | sputtering | evaporation | interconnect | metallization | crystal growth | reliability | fabrication | processing | photolithography | physical vapor deposition | MOS | MOS capacitor | microcantilever | microfluidic | integrated circuits;vacuum;chemical vapor deposition;CVD;oxidation;diffusion;implantation;lithography;soft lithography;etching;sputtering;evaporation;interconnect;metallization;crystal growth;reliability;fabrication;processing;photolithography;physical vapor deposition;MOS;MOS capacitor;microcantilever;microfluidic | integrated circuits | vacuum | chemical vapor deposition | CVD | oxidation | diffusion | implantation | lithography | soft lithography | etching | sputtering | evaporation | interconnect | metallization | crystal growth | reliability | fabrication | processing | photolithography | physical vapor deposition | MOS | MOS capacitor | microcantilever | microfluidic | 6.152 | 3.155

License

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9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT) 9.65 Cognitive Processes (MIT)

Description

An introduction to human information processing and learning; topics include the nature of mental representation and processing; the architecture of memory; pattern recognition; attention; imagery and mental codes; concepts and prototypes; reasoning and problem solving. An introduction to human information processing and learning; topics include the nature of mental representation and processing; the architecture of memory; pattern recognition; attention; imagery and mental codes; concepts and prototypes; reasoning and problem solving.

Subjects

human | human | information processing | information processing | learning | learning | mental representation | mental representation | processing | processing | architecture of memory | architecture of memory | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | attention | attention | imagery | imagery | mental codes | mental codes | concepts | concepts | prototypes | prototypes | reasoning | reasoning | problem solving | problem solving

License

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT) 3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091. This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | materials of nature | objects of material culture | objects of material culture | glass | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | metals | Mesoamerica | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | materials development | ancient glass | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | rubber processing | materials processing | materials processing | materials engineering | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | pre-modern technology | ceramics | ceramics | fibers | fibers | ideology | ideology | values | values | anthropology | anthropology | archaeology | archaeology | history | history | culture | culture

License

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

language processing | structure | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | storage | Morphological processing | Ambiguity resolution | computational modeling | connectionist models | critical period | Speech acquisition | word acquisition | self-paced reading | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | maging | language acquisition

License

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6.774 Physics of Microfabrication: Front End Processing (MIT) 6.774 Physics of Microfabrication: Front End Processing (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is offered to graduates and focuses on understanding the fundamental principles of the "front-end" processes used in the fabrication of devices for silicon integrated circuits. This includes advanced physical models and practical aspects of major processes, such as oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, and epitaxy. Other topics covered include: high performance MOS and bipolar devices including ultra-thin gate oxides, implant-damage enhanced diffusion, advanced metrology, and new materials such as Silicon Germanium (SiGe). Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is offered to graduates and focuses on understanding the fundamental principles of the "front-end" processes used in the fabrication of devices for silicon integrated circuits. This includes advanced physical models and practical aspects of major processes, such as oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, and epitaxy. Other topics covered include: high performance MOS and bipolar devices including ultra-thin gate oxides, implant-damage enhanced diffusion, advanced metrology, and new materials such as Silicon Germanium (SiGe).

Subjects

fabrication processes | fabrication processes | silicon | silicon | integrated circuits | integrated circuits | monolithic integrated circuits | monolithic integrated circuits | physical models | physical models | bulk crystal growth | bulk crystal growth | thermal oxidation | thermal oxidation | solid-state diffusion | solid-state diffusion | ion implantation | ion implantation | epitaxial deposition | epitaxial deposition | chemical vapor deposition | chemical vapor deposition | physical vapor deposition | physical vapor deposition | refractory metal silicides | refractory metal silicides | plasma and reactive ion etching | plasma and reactive ion etching | rapid thermal processing | rapid thermal processing | process modeling | process modeling | process simulation | process simulation | technological limitations | technological limitations | integrated circuit design | integrated circuit design | integrated circuit fabrication | integrated circuit fabrication | device operation | device operation | sige materials | sige materials | processing | processing

License

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3.044 Materials Processing (MIT) 3.044 Materials Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is focused on physical understanding of materials processing, and the scaling laws that govern process speed, volume, and material quality. In particular, this course will cover the transport of heat and matter as these topics apply to materials processing. This course is focused on physical understanding of materials processing, and the scaling laws that govern process speed, volume, and material quality. In particular, this course will cover the transport of heat and matter as these topics apply to materials processing.

Subjects

materials processing | materials processing | heat conduction | heat conduction | heat transfer | heat transfer | Biot number | Biot number | glass fibers | glass fibers | thermal spray | thermal spray | 2D analysis | 2D analysis | friction welding | friction welding | radiation | radiation | black bodies | black bodies | emessivity | emessivity | solidification | solidification | sand casting | sand casting | lost foam | lost foam | molds | molds | binary solidification | binary solidification | microstructures | microstructures | fluid flow | fluid flow | glass production | glass production | Pilkington glass | Pilkington glass | drag force | drag force | Newtonian | Newtonian | non-Newtonian | non-Newtonian | blow molding | blow molding | compressive forming | compressive forming | powder | powder | sintering | sintering | slurry | slurry | and colloid processing | and colloid processing | steel making | steel making | electronics manufacturing | electronics manufacturing

License

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6.152J Micro/Nano Processing Technology (MIT) 6.152J Micro/Nano Processing Technology (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the theory and technology of micro/nano fabrication. Lectures and laboratory sessions focus on basic processing techniques such as diffusion, oxidation, photolithography, chemical vapor deposition, and more. Through team lab assignments, students are expected to gain an understanding of these processing techniques, and how they are applied in concert to device fabrication. Students enrolled in this course have a unique opportunity to fashion and test micro/nano-devices, using modern techniques and technology. This course introduces the theory and technology of micro/nano fabrication. Lectures and laboratory sessions focus on basic processing techniques such as diffusion, oxidation, photolithography, chemical vapor deposition, and more. Through team lab assignments, students are expected to gain an understanding of these processing techniques, and how they are applied in concert to device fabrication. Students enrolled in this course have a unique opportunity to fashion and test micro/nano-devices, using modern techniques and technology.

Subjects

microelectronics | microelectronics | Microelectronics processing | Microelectronics processing | integrated circuits | integrated circuits | vacuum | vacuum | chemical vapor deposition | chemical vapor deposition | CVD | CVD | oxidation | oxidation | diffusion | diffusion | implantation | implantation | lithography | lithography | soft lithography | soft lithography | etching | etching | sputtering | sputtering | evaporation | evaporation | interconnect | interconnect | metallization | metallization | crystal growth | crystal growth | reliability | reliability | fabrication | fabrication | processing | processing | photolithography | photolithography | physical vapor deposition | physical vapor deposition | MOS | MOS | MOS capacitor | MOS capacitor | microcantilever | microcantilever | microfluidic. | microfluidic.

License

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HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT) HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis (MIT)

Description

This team-taught multidisciplinary course provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. It begins with in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include: fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, and building and applying statistical models for fMRI data; and human subject issues including informed consent, institutional review board requirements and safety in the high field environment. Additional Facul This team-taught multidisciplinary course provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. It begins with in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for image signals. Parenchymal and cerebrovascular neuroanatomy and application of sophisticated structural analysis algorithms for segmentation and registration of functional data are discussed. Additional topics include: fMRI experimental design including block design, event related and exploratory data analysis methods, and building and applying statistical models for fMRI data; and human subject issues including informed consent, institutional review board requirements and safety in the high field environment. Additional Facul

Subjects

medical imaging | medical imaging | medical lab | medical lab | medical technology | medical technology | magnetic resonance imaging | magnetic resonance imaging | MRI | MRI | fMRI | fMRI | signal processing | signal processing | human brain mapping | human brain mapping | function | function | image formation physics | image formation physics | metabolism | metabolism | psychology | psychology | physiology | physiology | image signals | image signals | image processing | image processing | parenchymal | parenchymal | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | cerebrovascular neuroanatomy | neurology | neurology | functional data analysis | functional data analysis | experimental design | experimental design | statistical models | statistical models | human subjects | human subjects | informed consent | informed consent | institutional review board requirements | institutional review board requirements | safety | safety | medical | medical | brain scan | brain scan | brain imaging | brain imaging | DTI | DTI | vision | vision

License

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HST.582J Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (MIT) HST.582J Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (MIT)

Description

This course presents the fundamentals of digital signal processing with particular emphasis on problems in biomedical research and clinical medicine. It covers principles and algorithms for processing both deterministic and random signals. Topics include data acquisition, imaging, filtering, coding, feature extraction, and modeling. The focus of the course is a series of labs that provide practical experience in processing physiological data, with examples from cardiology, speech processing, and medical imaging. The labs are done in MATLAB® during weekly lab sessions that take place in an electronic classroom. Lectures cover signal processing topics relevant to the lab exercises, as well as background on the biological signals processed in the labs. This course presents the fundamentals of digital signal processing with particular emphasis on problems in biomedical research and clinical medicine. It covers principles and algorithms for processing both deterministic and random signals. Topics include data acquisition, imaging, filtering, coding, feature extraction, and modeling. The focus of the course is a series of labs that provide practical experience in processing physiological data, with examples from cardiology, speech processing, and medical imaging. The labs are done in MATLAB® during weekly lab sessions that take place in an electronic classroom. Lectures cover signal processing topics relevant to the lab exercises, as well as background on the biological signals processed in the labs.

Subjects

HST.582 | HST.582 | 6.555 | 6.555 | 16.456 | 16.456 | signal processing | signal processing | medicine | medicine | biological signal | biological signal | diagnosis | diagnosis | diagnostic tool | diagnostic tool | physiology | physiology | cardiology | cardiology | speech recognition | speech recognition | speech processing | speech processing | imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | MRI | MRI | ultrasound | ultrasound | ECG | ECG | electrocardiogram | electrocardiogram | fourier | fourier | FFT | FFT | applications of probabilitym | applications of probabilitym | noise | noise | MATLAB | MATLAB | digital filter | digital filter | DSP | DSP

License

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9.04 Sensory Systems (MIT) 9.04 Sensory Systems (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course examines the neural bases of sensory perception. The focus is on physiological and anatomical studies of the mammalian nervous system as well as behavioral studies of animals and humans. Topics include visual pattern, color and depth perception, auditory responses and sound localization, and somatosensory perception. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course examines the neural bases of sensory perception. The focus is on physiological and anatomical studies of the mammalian nervous system as well as behavioral studies of animals and humans. Topics include visual pattern, color and depth perception, auditory responses and sound localization, and somatosensory perception.

Subjects

sensory systems | sensory systems | visual system | visual system | auditory system | auditory system | visual processing | visual processing | auditory processing | auditory processing | perception | perception | sensorimotor control | sensorimotor control | nervous system | nervous system | depth perception | depth perception | auditory responses | auditory responses | speech coding | speech coding | spatial localization | spatial localization | retina | retina | lateral geniculate nucleus | lateral geniculate nucleus | visual cortex | visual cortex | auditory nerve | auditory nerve | Cochlear | Cochlear | brainstem reflexes | brainstem reflexes | sound localization | sound localization | auditory cortex | auditory cortex | echolocation | echolocation

License

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9.63 Laboratory in Cognitive Science (MIT)

Description

Teaches principles of experimental methods in human perception and cognition, including design and statistical analysis. Combines lectures and hands-on experimental exercises; requires an independent experimental project. Some experience in programming desirable. To foster improved writing and presentation skills in conducting and critiquing research in cognitive science, students are required to provide reports and give oral presentations of three team experiments; a fourth individually conducted experiment includes a proposal with revision, and concluding written and oral reports.

Subjects

language processing | structure | Sentence processing | Discourse processing | storage | Morphological processing | Ambiguity resolution | computational modeling | connectionist models | critical period | Speech acquisition | word acquisition | self-paced reading | eye-tracking | cross-modal priming | maging | language acquisition

License

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