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1.963 Globalization of the Engineering and Construction Industry (MIT) 1.963 Globalization of the Engineering and Construction Industry (MIT)

Description

This course explores the challenges and risks faced by senior managers of construction, engineering and architecture companies in entering global markets in general, and sponsoring concessions in particular. The course includes a discussion of innovative approaches to nation building, partnering, finance, utilization of specialized delivery systems, privatization, outsourcing and concessions; opportunities created by advanced information technology; and appropriate strategies for entering attractive and rapidly expanding international fields and markets. This course explores the challenges and risks faced by senior managers of construction, engineering and architecture companies in entering global markets in general, and sponsoring concessions in particular. The course includes a discussion of innovative approaches to nation building, partnering, finance, utilization of specialized delivery systems, privatization, outsourcing and concessions; opportunities created by advanced information technology; and appropriate strategies for entering attractive and rapidly expanding international fields and markets.

Subjects

management | construction | engineering | architecture | global markets | concessions | partnering | finance | privatization | outsourcing | information technology | international | globalization | greatest construction projects | Mexican road privatization | management | construction | engineering | architecture | global markets | concessions | partnering | finance | privatization | outsourcing | information technology | international | globalization | greatest construction projects | Mexican road privatization | management | management | construction | construction | engineering | engineering | architecture | architecture | global markets | global markets | concessions | concessions | partnering | partnering | finance | finance | privatization | privatization | outsourcing | outsourcing | information technology | information technology | international | international | globalization | globalization | greatest construction projects | greatest construction projects | Mexican road privatization | Mexican road privatization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.123 Big Plans (MIT) 11.123 Big Plans (MIT)

Description

This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered. This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered.

Subjects

large projects | large projects | debate and commitment in advance of action | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | technology | politics | politics | economics | economics | culture | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | ways of generating public support | ways of generating public support | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | environmental impacts | environmental impacts | political accountability | political accountability | health and safety factors | health and safety factors | social equity | social equity | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.83X Space Systems Engineering (MIT) 16.83X Space Systems Engineering (MIT)

Description

Space Systems Engineering (16.83X) is the astronautical capstone course option in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.  Between Spring 2002 and Spring 2003, the course was offered in a 3-semester format, using a Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate (C-D-I-O) teaching model. 16.83X is shorthand for the three course numbers: 16.83, 16.831, and 16.832. The first semester (16.83) is the Conceive-Design phase of the project, which results in a detailed system design, but precedes assembly.  The second semester (16.831) is the Implement phase, and involves building the students' system.  The final semester (16.832) is the Operate phase, in which the system is tested and readied to perform in its intended environment. This year's project obj Space Systems Engineering (16.83X) is the astronautical capstone course option in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.  Between Spring 2002 and Spring 2003, the course was offered in a 3-semester format, using a Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate (C-D-I-O) teaching model. 16.83X is shorthand for the three course numbers: 16.83, 16.831, and 16.832. The first semester (16.83) is the Conceive-Design phase of the project, which results in a detailed system design, but precedes assembly.  The second semester (16.831) is the Implement phase, and involves building the students' system.  The final semester (16.832) is the Operate phase, in which the system is tested and readied to perform in its intended environment. This year's project obj

Subjects

space systems engineering | space systems engineering | CDIO | CDIO | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | trajectory analysis | trajectory analysis | entry dynamics | entry dynamics | propulsion | propulsion | power | power | structural design | structural design | avionics | avionics | thermal control | thermal control | environmental control | environmental control | human factors | human factors | support systems | support systems | weight estimates | weight estimates | cost estimates | cost estimates | student projects | student projects | integrated vehicle design | integrated vehicle design | team communication | team communication | electromagnetic formation flight | electromagnetic formation flight | satellites | satellites | TARR preparation | TARR preparation | subsystem design | subsystem design | subsystem prototyping | subsystem prototyping | trade analysis and requirements review | trade analysis and requirements review

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Prema Kuman making Kolam art in Jacksonville

Description

Subjects

women | florida | jacksonville | decorativearts | materialculture | duvalcounty | eastindians | ethnicarts | eastindianart | kumanprema | eastindianwomen | ethnicityindian | ethnicityasian | asianamericanarts | duvalcountyfolkartsineducation | folklifeandfolkloreprojects | housemarks | bureauoffloridafolklifeprograms | kolamhousemarks | projectsinterstate

License

No known copyright restrictions

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4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT) 4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT)

Description

4.42J (or 2.66J or 1.044J), Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings, is an undergraduate class offered in the Department of Architecture, and jointly in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. It provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. Throughout the course, the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings are introduced.  Two design projects play a major part in this class. They will require creative use of the principles and information given in the course to solve a particular problem, relating to energy consumption in buildings. The students will be asked to propose and assess innovativ 4.42J (or 2.66J or 1.044J), Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings, is an undergraduate class offered in the Department of Architecture, and jointly in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. It provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. Throughout the course, the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings are introduced.  Two design projects play a major part in this class. They will require creative use of the principles and information given in the course to solve a particular problem, relating to energy consumption in buildings. The students will be asked to propose and assess innovativ

Subjects

energy in buildings | energy in buildings | thermo-sciences | thermo-sciences | energy | energy | ventilation | ventilation | air conditioning and comfort in buildings | air conditioning and comfort in buildings | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | electricity | electricity | architecture | architecture | building technology | building technology | civil engineering | civil engineering | buildings | buildings | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | air-water vapor mixtures | air-water vapor mixtures | thermal comfort | thermal comfort | heat pumps | heat pumps | refrigeration cycles | refrigeration cycles | thermodynamic performance | thermodynamic performance | heat transfer | heat transfer | creative design projects | creative design projects | air conditioning | air conditioning | energy consumption | energy consumption | building designs | building designs | building technologies | building technologies | operating schemes | operating schemes | properties of gases | properties of gases | properties of liquids | properties of liquids | power producing systems | power producing systems | energy losses | energy losses | building envelope | building envelope | 4.42 | 4.42 | 1.044 | 1.044 | 2.66 | 2.66

License

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11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations: How Organizations Behave (MIT) 11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations: How Organizations Behave (MIT)

Description

This class analyzes how organizations behave, both government and nongovernment, drawing on the literature of the sociology of organizations, political science, and public administration. The class seeks to demonstrate rationality in otherwise seemingly chaotic organizational environments and implementation experiences. It builds analytical skills for evaluating programs and projects, organizations, and environments, and draws equally on developing-country and developed-country literature. This class analyzes how organizations behave, both government and nongovernment, drawing on the literature of the sociology of organizations, political science, and public administration. The class seeks to demonstrate rationality in otherwise seemingly chaotic organizational environments and implementation experiences. It builds analytical skills for evaluating programs and projects, organizations, and environments, and draws equally on developing-country and developed-country literature.

Subjects

organizations | organizations | organizational behavior | organizational behavior | government and nongovernment | government and nongovernment | sociology of organizations | sociology of organizations | political science | political science | public administration | public administration | chaotic organizational environments | chaotic organizational environments | implementation experience | implementation experience | analytical skills | analytical skills | projects | projects | and environments | and environments | developing-country and developed-country | developing-country and developed-country

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.670 Mechanical Engineering Tools (MIT) 2.670 Mechanical Engineering Tools (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the fundamentals of machine tool and computer tool use. Students work with a variety of machine tools including the bandsaw, milling machine, and lathe. Instruction given on MATLAB®, MAPLE®, XESS™, and CAD. Emphasis is on problem solving, not programming or algorithmic development. Assignments are project-oriented relating to mechanical engineering topics. It is recommended that students take this subject in the first IAP after declaring the major in Mechanical Engineering. This course was co-created by Prof. Douglas Hart and Dr. Kevin Otto. This course introduces the fundamentals of machine tool and computer tool use. Students work with a variety of machine tools including the bandsaw, milling machine, and lathe. Instruction given on MATLAB®, MAPLE®, XESS™, and CAD. Emphasis is on problem solving, not programming or algorithmic development. Assignments are project-oriented relating to mechanical engineering topics. It is recommended that students take this subject in the first IAP after declaring the major in Mechanical Engineering. This course was co-created by Prof. Douglas Hart and Dr. Kevin Otto.

Subjects

fundamentals of machine tool and computer tool use | fundamentals of machine tool and computer tool use | bandsaw | bandsaw | milling machine | milling machine | lathe | lathe | MATLAB | MATLAB | MAPLE | MAPLE | XESS | XESS | CAD | CAD | problem solving | problem solving | project-oriented | project-oriented | machine tool use | machine tool use | computer tool use | computer tool use | mechanical engineering projects | mechanical engineering projects | Inter Activities Period | Inter Activities Period | IAP | IAP | engine design | engine design | engine construction | engine construction | Stirling engines | Stirling engines

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications. Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications.

Subjects

Phenomenology | Phenomenology | mechanical behavior | mechanical behavior | material structure | material structure | deformation | deformation | failure | failure | elasticity | elasticity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | creep | creep | fracture | fracture | fatigue | fatigue | metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | thin films | thin films | carbon nanotubes | carbon nanotubes | battery materials | battery materials | superelastic alloys | superelastic alloys | defect nucleation | defect nucleation | student projects | student projects | viral capsides | viral capsides

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.298 Art of Color (MIT) SP.298 Art of Color (MIT)

Description

This seminar introduces, through studio projects, the basic principles regarding the use of color in the visual arts. Students explore a range of topics, including the historical uses of color in the arts, the interactions between colors, and the psychology of color. This seminar introduces, through studio projects, the basic principles regarding the use of color in the visual arts. Students explore a range of topics, including the historical uses of color in the arts, the interactions between colors, and the psychology of color.

Subjects

visual design | visual design | studio projects | studio projects | color | color | visual arts | visual arts | color and value balance | color and value balance | warm colors | warm colors | cold colors | cold colors | interaction of colors | interaction of colors | science of color | science of color | color theory | color theory | multi-media | multi-media | ESG.SP298 | ESG.SP298

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.869 Political Science Scope and Methods (MIT) 17.869 Political Science Scope and Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to provide an introduction to a variety of empirical research methods used by political scientists. The primary aims of the course are to make you a more sophisticated consumer of diverse empirical research and to allow you to conduct sophisticated independent work in your junior and senior years. This is not a course in data analysis. Rather, it is a course on how to approach political science research. This course is designed to provide an introduction to a variety of empirical research methods used by political scientists. The primary aims of the course are to make you a more sophisticated consumer of diverse empirical research and to allow you to conduct sophisticated independent work in your junior and senior years. This is not a course in data analysis. Rather, it is a course on how to approach political science research.

Subjects

political science | political science | empirical research | empirical research | scientific method | scientific method | research design | research design | models | models | samping | samping | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | measurement | measurement | ethics | ethics | empirical | empirical | research | research | scientific | scientific | methods | methods | statistics | statistics | statistical | statistical | analysis | analysis | political | political | politics | politics | science | science | design | design | sampling | sampling | theoretical | theoretical | observation | observation | data | data | case studies | case studies | cases | cases | empirical research methods | empirical research methods | political scientists | political scientists | empirical analysis | empirical analysis | theoretical analysis | theoretical analysis | research projects | research projects | department faculty | department faculty | inference | inference | writing | writing | revision | revision | oral presentations | oral presentations | experimental method | experimental method | theories | theories | political implications | political implications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.63J System Safety (MIT) 16.63J System Safety (MIT)

Description

This class introduces the concepts of system safety and how to analyze and design safer systems. Topics include the causes of accidents in general, and recent major accidents in particular; hazard analysis, safety-driven design techniques; design of human-automation interaction; integrating safety into the system engineering process; and managing and operating safety-critical systems. This class introduces the concepts of system safety and how to analyze and design safer systems. Topics include the causes of accidents in general, and recent major accidents in particular; hazard analysis, safety-driven design techniques; design of human-automation interaction; integrating safety into the system engineering process; and managing and operating safety-critical systems.

Subjects

16.63 | 16.63 | ESD.03 | ESD.03 | hazard analysis | hazard analysis | system safety | system safety | accident analysis | accident analysis | design for safety | design for safety | accident causality mode | accident causality mode | hindsight bias | hindsight bias | accident report | accident report | occupational safety | occupational safety | CAST analysis | CAST analysis | human factors | human factors | safety control structure | safety control structure | operations | operations | safety management | safety management | critical projects | critical projects | STPA hazard analysis | STPA hazard analysis | STAMP | STAMP

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT) 11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT)

Description

This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are (1) employment and local economic development, particularly as related to the informal sector, small and medium enterprises, and workers; (2) the political economy of local economic-development initiatives; (3) lessons from policy and implementation experiences; (4) worker conditions, standards, and rights; and (5) associations among small (and often medium) firms, and among workers. The course links these approaches to the broader literature on poverty reduction, economic development, politics, and the reform of government. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are (1) employment and local economic development, particularly as related to the informal sector, small and medium enterprises, and workers; (2) the political economy of local economic-development initiatives; (3) lessons from policy and implementation experiences; (4) worker conditions, standards, and rights; and (5) associations among small (and often medium) firms, and among workers. The course links these approaches to the broader literature on poverty reduction, economic development, politics, and the reform of government. It discusses the types of initiatives, tasks, and

Subjects

public sector | public sector | policies | policies | programs | programs | projects | projects | poverty | poverty | unemployment | unemployment | developing countries | developing countries | local economic development | local economic development | informal sector | informal sector | small enterprises | small enterprises | political economy | political economy | local economic development initiatives | local economic development initiatives | implementation | implementation | worker conditions | worker conditions | associations | associations | government reform | government reform | poverty reduction | poverty reduction | equitable outcomes | equitable outcomes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations (MIT) 11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations (MIT)

Description

Organizations and their programs often seem, at first glance, chaotic and without order. Students embarking on evaluations and similar research, therefore, feel perplexed when faced with a live organization. This is because we have been taught to expect a certain kind of rationality in the way organizations behave that is often different than that which actually drives them. As a result of this seeming mismatch between what we expect and the actual reality, students of planning and planners, and researchers and professional evaluators, often recoil from the chaos of reality, wondering why the organization is not doing what it is "supposed" to be doing; correspondingly, they often make recommendations for change that are unrealistic, or draw conclusions from evaluations of success or fail Organizations and their programs often seem, at first glance, chaotic and without order. Students embarking on evaluations and similar research, therefore, feel perplexed when faced with a live organization. This is because we have been taught to expect a certain kind of rationality in the way organizations behave that is often different than that which actually drives them. As a result of this seeming mismatch between what we expect and the actual reality, students of planning and planners, and researchers and professional evaluators, often recoil from the chaos of reality, wondering why the organization is not doing what it is "supposed" to be doing; correspondingly, they often make recommendations for change that are unrealistic, or draw conclusions from evaluations of success or fail

Subjects

organizations | organizations | organizational behavior | organizational behavior | government and nongovernment | government and nongovernment | sociology of organizations | sociology of organizations | political science | political science | public administration | public administration | chaotic organizational environments | chaotic organizational environments | implementation experience | implementation experience | analytical skills | analytical skills | projects | projects | and environments | and environments | developing-country and developed-country | developing-country and developed-country

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations (MIT) 11.235 Analyzing Projects and Organizations (MIT)

Description

This course teaches students how to understand the rationality behind how organizations and their programs behave, and to be comfortable and analytical with a live organization. It thereby builds analytic skills for evaluating programs and projects, organizations, and environments. It draws on the literature of the sociology of organizations, political science, public administration, and historical experience-and is based on both developing-country and developed-country experience. This course teaches students how to understand the rationality behind how organizations and their programs behave, and to be comfortable and analytical with a live organization. It thereby builds analytic skills for evaluating programs and projects, organizations, and environments. It draws on the literature of the sociology of organizations, political science, public administration, and historical experience-and is based on both developing-country and developed-country experience.

Subjects

analyzing projects | analyzing projects | analyzing organizations | analyzing organizations | evaluation | organizational behavior | evaluation | organizational behavior | street-level bureaucrats | street-level bureaucrats | public management reforms | public management reforms | public management models | public management models | compliance | compliance | international organizations | international organizations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.347 Doctoral Seminar in Research Methods I (MIT) 15.347 Doctoral Seminar in Research Methods I (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to lay the foundations of good empirical research in the social sciences. It does not deal with specific techniques per se, but rather with the assumptions and the logic underlying social research. Students become acquainted with a variety of approaches to research design, and are helped to develop their own research projects and to evaluate the products of empirical research. This course is designed to lay the foundations of good empirical research in the social sciences. It does not deal with specific techniques per se, but rather with the assumptions and the logic underlying social research. Students become acquainted with a variety of approaches to research design, and are helped to develop their own research projects and to evaluate the products of empirical research.

Subjects

good empirical research | good empirical research | social sciences | social sciences | assumptions and the logic underlying social research | assumptions and the logic underlying social research | research design | research design | research projects | research projects | products of empirical research | products of empirical research

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.163 Strobe Project Laboratory (MIT) 6.163 Strobe Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This is a laboratory experience course with a focus on photography, electronic imaging, and light measurement, much of it at short duration. In addition to teaching these techniques, the course provides students with experience working in a laboratory and teaches good work habits and techniques for approaching laboratory work. A major purpose of 6.163 is to provide students with many opportunities to sharpen their communication skills: oral, written, and visual. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This is a laboratory experience course with a focus on photography, electronic imaging, and light measurement, much of it at short duration. In addition to teaching these techniques, the course provides students with experience working in a laboratory and teaches good work habits and techniques for approaching laboratory work. A major purpose of 6.163 is to provide students with many opportunities to sharpen their communication skills: oral, written, and visual.

Subjects

strobe | strobe | edgerton | edgerton | electronic imaging | electronic imaging | light measurement | light measurement | strobe laboratory | strobe laboratory | electronic flash sources | electronic flash sources | measurement | measurement | fundamentals of photography | fundamentals of photography | experiments on application of electronic flash to photography | stroboscopy | motion analysis | and high-speed videography | experiments on application of electronic flash to photography | stroboscopy | motion analysis | and high-speed videography | independent projects | independent projects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.672 Projects Laboratory (MIT) 2.672 Projects Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This is an engineering laboratory subject for mechanical engineering juniors and seniors. Major emphasis is on interplay between analytical and experimental methods in solution of research and development problems. Communication (written and oral) of results is also a strong component of the course. Groups of two or three students work together on three projects during the term. This is an engineering laboratory subject for mechanical engineering juniors and seniors. Major emphasis is on interplay between analytical and experimental methods in solution of research and development problems. Communication (written and oral) of results is also a strong component of the course. Groups of two or three students work together on three projects during the term.

Subjects

Engineering laboratory | Engineering laboratory | mechanical engineering | mechanical engineering | juniors | juniors | seniors | seniors | analytical and experimental methods | analytical and experimental methods | research and development problems | research and development problems | Communication (written and oral) | Communication (written and oral) | projects | projects | analytical method | analytical method | experimental method | experimental method | research and development | research and development | D | D

License

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2.72 Elements of Mechanical Design (MIT) 2.72 Elements of Mechanical Design (MIT)

Description

In 2.72, students will learn the theory and experience the practice of machine design in the context of real world machine design hardware projects. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of machine elements to the design process; including their availability, their uses, and the methods for determining their potential performance. Each group will complete and document a design layout for a prototype device. In 2.72, students will learn the theory and experience the practice of machine design in the context of real world machine design hardware projects. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of machine elements to the design process; including their availability, their uses, and the methods for determining their potential performance. Each group will complete and document a design layout for a prototype device.

Subjects

machine design | machine design | hardware projects | hardware projects | machine elements | machine elements | design process | design process | design layout | design layout | prototype | prototype

License

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Harley Cason making cane syrup at the Stephen Foster State Folk Culture Center in White Springs

Description

Subjects

cooking | florida | agriculture | cooks | sugarcane | kettles | hamiltoncounty | whitesprings | materialculture | syrupmaking | foodhabits | grahamandrea | floridafolklifeprogram | projectsinstate | folklifeandfolkloreprojects | stephenfosterstatefolkculturecenter | casonharley | folkartsandindustriesproject

License

No known copyright restrictions

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11.123 Big Plans (MIT)

Description

This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered.

Subjects

large projects | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | ways of generating public support | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | environmental impacts | political accountability | health and safety factors | social equity | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.360 Community Growth and Land Use Planning (MIT) 11.360 Community Growth and Land Use Planning (MIT)

Description

This course combines a seminar format with fieldwork to examine strategies of planning and control for growth and land use, chiefly at the municipal level. Specific topics include growth and its local consequences; land use planning approaches; and implementation tools including innovative zoning and regulatory techniques, physical design, and natural systems integration. Projects are arranged with small teams serving municipal clients. This course combines a seminar format with fieldwork to examine strategies of planning and control for growth and land use, chiefly at the municipal level. Specific topics include growth and its local consequences; land use planning approaches; and implementation tools including innovative zoning and regulatory techniques, physical design, and natural systems integration. Projects are arranged with small teams serving municipal clients.

Subjects

growth management | growth management | land use planning and change | land use planning and change | planning | planning | professional practice | professional practice | participatory processes | participatory processes | client-based projects | client-based projects | GIS | GIS | community particpation | community particpation | regional development | regional development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.360 Community Growth and Land Use Planning (MIT) 11.360 Community Growth and Land Use Planning (MIT)

Description

This course combines a seminar format with fieldwork to examine strategies of planning and control for growth and land use, chiefly at the municipal level. Specific topics include growth and its local consequences; land use planning approaches; and implementation tools including innovative zoning and regulatory techniques, physical design, and natural systems integration. Projects are arranged with small teams serving municipal clients. This course combines a seminar format with fieldwork to examine strategies of planning and control for growth and land use, chiefly at the municipal level. Specific topics include growth and its local consequences; land use planning approaches; and implementation tools including innovative zoning and regulatory techniques, physical design, and natural systems integration. Projects are arranged with small teams serving municipal clients.

Subjects

growth management | growth management | land use planning and change | land use planning and change | planning | planning | professional practice | professional practice | participatory processes | participatory processes | client-based projects | client-based projects | GIS | GIS | community particpation | community particpation | regional development | regional development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ESD.71 Engineering Systems Analysis for Design (MIT) ESD.71 Engineering Systems Analysis for Design (MIT)

Description

Engineering systems design must have the flexibility to take advantage of new opportunities while avoiding disasters. This subject develops "real options" analysis to create design flexibility and measure its value so that it can be incorporated into system optimization. It builds on essential concepts of system models, decision analysis, and financial concepts. Emphasis is placed on calculating value of real options with special attention given to efficient analysis and practical applications. The material is organized and presented to deal with the contextual reality of technological systems, that substantially distinguishes the analysis of real options in engineering systems from that of financial options. Note This MIT OpenCourseWare site is based on the materials from Profes Engineering systems design must have the flexibility to take advantage of new opportunities while avoiding disasters. This subject develops "real options" analysis to create design flexibility and measure its value so that it can be incorporated into system optimization. It builds on essential concepts of system models, decision analysis, and financial concepts. Emphasis is placed on calculating value of real options with special attention given to efficient analysis and practical applications. The material is organized and presented to deal with the contextual reality of technological systems, that substantially distinguishes the analysis of real options in engineering systems from that of financial options. Note This MIT OpenCourseWare site is based on the materials from Profes

Subjects

real options | real options | flexibility | flexibility | flexible design | flexible design | engineering systems | engineering systems | complex projects | complex projects | evaluation over time | evaluation over time | risk | risk | uncertainty | uncertainty | valuation | valuation | timing | timing | uncertainty modeling | uncertainty modeling | flexibility valuation | flexibility valuation | methods | methods | design analysis | design analysis | lattice analysis | lattice analysis | monte carlo simulation | monte carlo simulation | flexibility identification. | flexibility identification.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.011 Project Evaluation (MIT) 1.011 Project Evaluation (MIT)

Description

1.011 Project Evaluation covers methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale and long-lived and involve many economic, financial, social and environmental factors. The course places an emphasis on dealing with uncertainty. Students learn basic techniques of engineering economics, including net present value analysis, life-cycle costing, benefit-cost analysis, and other approaches to project evaluation. Examples are drawn from both contemporary and historical projects in various fields, including transportation systems, urban development, energy and environmental projects, water resource management, telecommunications systems, and other elements of the public and private projects and programs. 1.011 Project Evaluation covers methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale and long-lived and involve many economic, financial, social and environmental factors. The course places an emphasis on dealing with uncertainty. Students learn basic techniques of engineering economics, including net present value analysis, life-cycle costing, benefit-cost analysis, and other approaches to project evaluation. Examples are drawn from both contemporary and historical projects in various fields, including transportation systems, urban development, energy and environmental projects, water resource management, telecommunications systems, and other elements of the public and private projects and programs.

Subjects

civil engineering project | civil engineering project | engineering economics | engineering economics | net present value | net present value | life-cycle costing | life-cycle costing | benefit-cost analysis | benefit-cost analysis | project evaluation | project evaluation | cost estimation | cost estimation | large-scale infrastructure | large-scale infrastructure | building design | building design | construction | construction | transportation systems | transportation systems | urban development | urban development | environmental projects | environmental projects | water resource management | water resource management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.463J The Impact of Globalization on the Built Environment (MIT) 1.463J The Impact of Globalization on the Built Environment (MIT)

Description

The course is designed to provide a better understanding of the built environment, globalization, the current financial crisis and the impact of these factors on the rapidly changing and evolving international architecture, engineering, construction fields. We will, hopefully, obtain a better understanding of how these forces of globalization and the current financial crisis are having an impact on the built environment and how they will affect firms and your future career opportunities. We will also identify, review and discuss best practices and lessons that can be learned from recent events. We will explore the "international built environment" in detail, examining how it functions and asking what are the managerial, entrepreneurial and professional opportunities, challenges a The course is designed to provide a better understanding of the built environment, globalization, the current financial crisis and the impact of these factors on the rapidly changing and evolving international architecture, engineering, construction fields. We will, hopefully, obtain a better understanding of how these forces of globalization and the current financial crisis are having an impact on the built environment and how they will affect firms and your future career opportunities. We will also identify, review and discuss best practices and lessons that can be learned from recent events. We will explore the "international built environment" in detail, examining how it functions and asking what are the managerial, entrepreneurial and professional opportunities, challenges a

Subjects

1.463 | 1.463 | 11.342 | 11.342 | ESD.53 | ESD.53 | management | management | construction | construction | engineering | engineering | architecture | architecture | global markets | global markets | concessions | concessions | partnering | partnering | finance | finance | privatization | privatization | outsourcing | outsourcing | information technology | information technology | international | international | globalization | globalization | greatest construction projects | greatest construction projects | project delivery system | project delivery system | risk management | risk management | megacities | megacities | competitiveness | competitiveness

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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