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7.88J Protein Folding Problem (MIT) 7.88J Protein Folding Problem (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the mechanisms by which the amino acid sequence of polypeptide chains (proteins), determine their three-dimensional conformation. Topics in this course include sequence determinants of secondary structure, the folding of newly synthesized polypeptide chains within cells, folding intermediates aggregation and competing off-pathway reactions, and the unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro. Additional topics covered are the role of helper proteins such as chaperonins and isomerases, protein recovery problems in the biotechnology industry, and diseases found associated with protein folding defects. This course focuses on the mechanisms by which the amino acid sequence of polypeptide chains (proteins), determine their three-dimensional conformation. Topics in this course include sequence determinants of secondary structure, the folding of newly synthesized polypeptide chains within cells, folding intermediates aggregation and competing off-pathway reactions, and the unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro. Additional topics covered are the role of helper proteins such as chaperonins and isomerases, protein recovery problems in the biotechnology industry, and diseases found associated with protein folding defects.

Subjects

amino acid sequence | amino acid sequence | polypeptide chains | polypeptide chains | sequence determinants | sequence determinants | folding | folding | synthesized polypeptide chains within cells | synthesized polypeptide chains within cells | unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro | unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro | folding intermediates aggregation | folding intermediates aggregation | competing off-pathway reactions | competing off-pathway reactions | chaperonins | chaperonins | isomerases | isomerases | helper proteins | helper proteins | protein recovery problems | protein recovery problems | biotechnology industry | biotechnology industry | protein folding defects | protein folding defects | 3-D conformation | 3-D conformation | globular proteins | globular proteins | fibrous proteins | fibrous proteins | kinetics | kinetics | in vitro refolding | in vitro refolding | pathways | pathways | in vivo folding | in vivo folding | synthesized proteins | synthesized proteins | aggregation | aggregation | protein misfolding | protein misfolding | human disease | human disease | protein folding | protein folding | genome sequences | genome sequences | 7.88 | 7.88 | 5.48 | 5.48 | 7.24 | 7.24 | 10.543 | 10.543

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7.88J Protein Folding Problem (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the mechanisms by which the amino acid sequence of polypeptide chains (proteins), determine their three-dimensional conformation. Topics in this course include sequence determinants of secondary structure, the folding of newly synthesized polypeptide chains within cells, folding intermediates aggregation and competing off-pathway reactions, and the unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro. Additional topics covered are the role of helper proteins such as chaperonins and isomerases, protein recovery problems in the biotechnology industry, and diseases found associated with protein folding defects.

Subjects

amino acid sequence | polypeptide chains | sequence determinants | folding | synthesized polypeptide chains within cells | unfolding and refolding of proteins in vitro | folding intermediates aggregation | competing off-pathway reactions | chaperonins | isomerases | helper proteins | protein recovery problems | biotechnology industry | protein folding defects | 3-D conformation | globular proteins | fibrous proteins | kinetics | in vitro refolding | pathways | in vivo folding | synthesized proteins | aggregation | protein misfolding | human disease | protein folding | genome sequences | 7.88 | 5.48 | 7.24 | 10.543

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT) 7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe

Subjects

ubiquitination | ubiquitination | ubiquitin | ubiquitin | proteasome | proteasome | post-translational mechanisms | post-translational mechanisms | ubiquitin-conjugation system | ubiquitin-conjugation system | neurodegenerative diseases | neurodegenerative diseases | immune response | immune response | cell cycle regulation | cell cycle regulation | apoptosis | apoptosis | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | protein degradation | protein degradation | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | ligases | ligases | translocated proteins | translocated proteins | misfolded proteins | misfolded proteins | trafficking membranes | trafficking membranes | cell cycle control | cell cycle control | programmed cell death | programmed cell death | Huntington's Disease | Huntington's Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

License

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3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering. This course gives an introduction to the interactions between proteins, cells and surfaces of biomaterials. It includes surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers and ceramics, modification of biomaterials surfaces, and surface characterization methodology; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture and methods of statistical analysis; organ replacement therapies and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. The course includes topics in biosensors, drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Subjects

Interactions between proteins | Interactions between proteins | cells | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Quantitative assays of cell behavior | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Biosensors | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Interactions between proteins | cells | Interactions between proteins | cells | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | Biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | BE.340J | BE.340J | 3.051 | 3.051 | BE.340 | BE.340 | 20.340 | 20.340

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7.342 Sweet Discoveries: Unraveling the Complex World of Sugars in Health and Disease (MIT) 7.342 Sweet Discoveries: Unraveling the Complex World of Sugars in Health and Disease (MIT)

Description

Glycans, which are complex assemblies of sugars, are the most prevalent class of macromolecules, surpassing nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Glycans are essential for life, as they are a required energy source, provide protection against cellular stresses and shape cellular structure. During this course, we will explore the many roles glycans play in human health and disease. For example, we will learn about the healthy glycosylation patterns of many mammalian proteins and the dynamic changes that glycan structures undergo during early development and cancer metastasis, the influence of dietary carbohydrates on glycan metabolism, and the role of densely glycosylated proteins involved in HIV infectivity. Concurrently, we will learn about the chemical and biological techniques used to det Glycans, which are complex assemblies of sugars, are the most prevalent class of macromolecules, surpassing nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Glycans are essential for life, as they are a required energy source, provide protection against cellular stresses and shape cellular structure. During this course, we will explore the many roles glycans play in human health and disease. For example, we will learn about the healthy glycosylation patterns of many mammalian proteins and the dynamic changes that glycan structures undergo during early development and cancer metastasis, the influence of dietary carbohydrates on glycan metabolism, and the role of densely glycosylated proteins involved in HIV infectivity. Concurrently, we will learn about the chemical and biological techniques used to det

Subjects

Glycans | Glycans | glycobiology | glycobiology | glycosylation patterns | glycosylation patterns | glycoproteins | glycoproteins | glycan metabolism | glycan metabolism | glycosylated proteins | glycosylated proteins | protein-glycan interactions | protein-glycan interactions | high-throughput glycan arrays | high-throughput glycan arrays | O-glycans | O-glycans | N-linked glycosylation | N-linked glycosylation | glycosyl-amino acids | glycosyl-amino acids | Metabolic glycan labeling | Metabolic glycan labeling | synthetic antigens | synthetic antigens

License

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7.346 Virus-host Interactions in Infectious Diseases (MIT) 7.346 Virus-host Interactions in Infectious Diseases (MIT)

Description

Co-evolution and adaptation between viruses and humans are often portrayed as a zero-sum biological arms race. Viruses enter host cells equipped with an array of mechanisms to evade the host defense responses and replicate. The rapid rate of mutation of viruses permits evolution of various methodologies for infection, which in turn drive development of non-specific but highly effective host mechanisms to restrict infection. This class will discuss the varied solutions each side has developed as a means for survival. We will use examples drawn from human disease-causing pathogens that contribute seriously to the global health burden, including HIV, influenza and dengue virus. Primary research papers will be discussed to help students learn to pose scientific questions and design and conduct Co-evolution and adaptation between viruses and humans are often portrayed as a zero-sum biological arms race. Viruses enter host cells equipped with an array of mechanisms to evade the host defense responses and replicate. The rapid rate of mutation of viruses permits evolution of various methodologies for infection, which in turn drive development of non-specific but highly effective host mechanisms to restrict infection. This class will discuss the varied solutions each side has developed as a means for survival. We will use examples drawn from human disease-causing pathogens that contribute seriously to the global health burden, including HIV, influenza and dengue virus. Primary research papers will be discussed to help students learn to pose scientific questions and design and conduct

Subjects

virus | virus | host | host | infection | infection | protein-protein interactions | protein-protein interactions | host mimicry | host mimicry | intra-cellular trafficking | intra-cellular trafficking | host-cell machinery | host-cell machinery | signaling pathways | signaling pathways | antiviral proteins | antiviral proteins | HIV | HIV | influenza | influenza | dengue virus | dengue virus | biotechnology | biotechnology | vaccine development | vaccine development | host sensors | host sensors | IFN production | IFN production | Secreted IFN | Secreted IFN | filoviruses | filoviruses | hCMV | hCMV | IFITM proteins | IFITM proteins

License

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Proteins

Description

A chapter describing protein structure and function, including 53 figures and 7 large tables. It is intended as ~9hrs study time at level 2/3. It also provides background reading for the experimental investigation on SDS-PAGE and Western-blotting (http://open.jorum.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/1579).

Subjects

glycoproteins | lipid-linked proteins | catalysis | bioukoer | ukoer | proteins | enzymes | protein structure | domains | peptide bond | polypeptide | Biological sciences | C000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.88J Protein Folding and Human Disease (MIT) 7.88J Protein Folding and Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course covers amino acid sequence control of protein folding, misfolding, amyloid polymerization and aggregation. Readings and discussions address topics such as chaperone structure and function, folding and assembly of fibrous proteins, and pathologies associated with protein misfolding and aggregation in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and other protein deposition diseases. Students are required to write and present a research paper. This course covers amino acid sequence control of protein folding, misfolding, amyloid polymerization and aggregation. Readings and discussions address topics such as chaperone structure and function, folding and assembly of fibrous proteins, and pathologies associated with protein misfolding and aggregation in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and other protein deposition diseases. Students are required to write and present a research paper.

Subjects

protein folding | protein folding | misfolding | misfolding | aggregation | aggregation | protein structures | protein structures | folding intermediates | folding intermediates | off-pathway aggregation | off-pathway aggregation | amyloid formation | amyloid formation | Key chaperones | Key chaperones | chaperonins | chaperonins | human protein deposition diseases | human protein deposition diseases | Alzheimer’s disease | Alzheimer’s disease | Parkinson’s disease | Parkinson’s disease | Huntington’s disease | Huntington’s disease | amyloids | amyloids | prions | prions | amino acid sequence | amino acid sequence | amyloid polymerization | amyloid polymerization | chaperone structure and function | chaperone structure and function | folding and assembly of fibrous proteins | folding and assembly of fibrous proteins

License

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7.344 Antibiotics, Toxins, and Protein Engineering (MIT) 7.344 Antibiotics, Toxins, and Protein Engineering (MIT)

Description

The lethal poison Ricin (best known as a weapon of bioterrorism), Diphtheria toxin (the causative agent of a highly contagious bacterial disease), and the widely used antibiotic tetracycline have one thing in common: They specifically target the cell's translational apparatus and disrupt protein synthesis. In this course, we will explore the mechanisms of action of toxins and antibiotics, their roles in everyday medicine, and the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We will also discuss the identification of new drug targets and how we can manipulate the protein synthesis machinery to provide powerful tools for protein engineering and potential new treatments for patients with devastating diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. This course is one of many Advanced Und The lethal poison Ricin (best known as a weapon of bioterrorism), Diphtheria toxin (the causative agent of a highly contagious bacterial disease), and the widely used antibiotic tetracycline have one thing in common: They specifically target the cell's translational apparatus and disrupt protein synthesis. In this course, we will explore the mechanisms of action of toxins and antibiotics, their roles in everyday medicine, and the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We will also discuss the identification of new drug targets and how we can manipulate the protein synthesis machinery to provide powerful tools for protein engineering and potential new treatments for patients with devastating diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. This course is one of many Advanced Und

Subjects

lethal poison | lethal poison | Ricin | Ricin | Diphtheria | Diphtheria | contagious bacterial disease | contagious bacterial disease | tetracycline | tetracycline | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | drug resistance | drug resistance | protein engineering | protein engineering | cystic fibrosis | cystic fibrosis | muscular dystrophy | muscular dystrophy | ribosome | ribosome | ribosomal proteins | ribosomal proteins | rRNA | rRNA | mRNA | mRNA | tRNA | tRNA | translation factors | translation factors | genetic code | genetic code | E. coli ribosome | E. coli ribosome | prokaryotes | prokaryotes | eukaryotes | eukaryotes | Shiga | Shiga | Diphtheria toxin | Diphtheria toxin | Pseudomonas exotoxin A | Pseudomonas exotoxin A | Chloramphenicol | Chloramphenicol | Aminoglycoside | Aminoglycoside

License

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Chemistry, epigenetics and drugs

Description

Alteration of gene expression is fundamental to many diseases. A better understanding of how epigenetic proteins affect diseases provides a starting point for therapy development and the discovery of new drug. Professor Paul Brennan research focusses on epigenetics: the mechanisms that control gene expression. He studies how chemical probes interfere with epigenetic enyzmes that can be targeted to treat various diseases. Epigenetics combined with disease biology will ultimately accelerate drug discovery. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

gene expression | Epigenetics | proteins | drug discovery | enzymes | gene expression | Epigenetics | proteins | drug discovery | enzymes

License

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Chemistry, epigenetics and drugs

Description

Alteration of gene expression is fundamental to many diseases. A better understanding of how epigenetic proteins affect diseases provides a starting point for therapy development and the discovery of new drug. Professor Paul Brennan research focusses on epigenetics: the mechanisms that control gene expression. He studies how chemical probes interfere with epigenetic enyzmes that can be targeted to treat various diseases. Epigenetics combined with disease biology will ultimately accelerate drug discovery. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

gene expression | Epigenetics | proteins | drug discovery | enzymes | gene expression | Epigenetics | proteins | drug discovery | enzymes

License

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7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe

Subjects

ubiquitination | ubiquitin | proteasome | post-translational mechanisms | ubiquitin-conjugation system | neurodegenerative diseases | immune response | cell cycle regulation | apoptosis | signal transduction pathways | tumorigenesis | protein degradation | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | ligases | translocated proteins | misfolded proteins | trafficking membranes | cell cycle control | programmed cell death | Huntington's Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

License

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7.343 Protein Folding, Misfolding and Human Disease (MIT) 7.343 Protein Folding, Misfolding and Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. The instructor for this course, Dr. Kosinski-Collins, is a member of the HHMI Education Group. Maintenance of the complex three-dimensional structure adopted by a protein in the cell is vital for function. Oftentimes, as a consequence of environmental stress, genetic mutation, and/or infection, the folded structure of a protein gets altered and multiple proteins stick and fall out of solution in a process known as aggregation. In many protein aggregation diseases, incorrectly folded proteins self-associate, for This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. The instructor for this course, Dr. Kosinski-Collins, is a member of the HHMI Education Group. Maintenance of the complex three-dimensional structure adopted by a protein in the cell is vital for function. Oftentimes, as a consequence of environmental stress, genetic mutation, and/or infection, the folded structure of a protein gets altered and multiple proteins stick and fall out of solution in a process known as aggregation. In many protein aggregation diseases, incorrectly folded proteins self-associate, for

Subjects

protein folding | protein folding | misfolded proteins | misfolded proteins | Mad Cow | Mad Cow | Creutzfedt-Jakob Disease | Creutzfedt-Jakob Disease | Alzheimer's Disease | Alzheimer's Disease | Huntington's Disease | Huntington's Disease | protein aggregation | protein aggregation | self-associate | self-associate | cell death | cell death | dementia | dementia | prions | prions | bovine spongiform encephalopathy | bovine spongiform encephalopathy | kuru | kuru | scrapie | scrapie | protein structure | protein structure | amyloid protein | amyloid protein | amyloidosis | amyloidosis | polyglutamine repeats | polyglutamine repeats | fibrils | fibrils

License

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3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT) 3.051J Materials for Biomedical Applications (MIT)

Description

This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. This class provides an introduction to the interactions between cells and the surfaces of biomaterials. The course covers: surface chemistry and physics of selected metals, polymers, and ceramics; surface characterization methodology; modification of biomaterials surfaces; quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture; biosensors and microarrays; bulk properties of implants; and acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials. General topics include biosensors, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

Subjects

interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | interactions between proteins | cells and surfaces of biomaterials | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | surface chemistry and physics of metals | polymers and ceramics | Surface characterization methodology | Surface characterization methodology | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Quantitative assays of cell behavior in culture | Organ replacement therapies | Organ replacement therapies | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | Acute and chronic response to implanted biomaterials | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering | biosensors | drug delivery and tissue engineering

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7.51 Graduate Biochemistry (MIT) 7.51 Graduate Biochemistry (MIT)

Description

The tools and analytical methods that biochemists use to dissect biological problems. Analysis of the mode of action and structure of regulatory, binding, and catalytic proteins. The tools and analytical methods that biochemists use to dissect biological problems. Analysis of the mode of action and structure of regulatory, binding, and catalytic proteins.

Subjects

catalytic proteins | catalytic proteins | protein binding | protein binding

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7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer),

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | human biology | human biology | inherited diseases | inherited diseases | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | human genetics | human genetics | human diseases | human diseases | infectious agents | infectious agents | infectious diseases | infectious diseases

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7.342 Sweet Discoveries: Unraveling the Complex World of Sugars in Health and Disease (MIT)

Description

Glycans, which are complex assemblies of sugars, are the most prevalent class of macromolecules, surpassing nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Glycans are essential for life, as they are a required energy source, provide protection against cellular stresses and shape cellular structure. During this course, we will explore the many roles glycans play in human health and disease. For example, we will learn about the healthy glycosylation patterns of many mammalian proteins and the dynamic changes that glycan structures undergo during early development and cancer metastasis, the influence of dietary carbohydrates on glycan metabolism, and the role of densely glycosylated proteins involved in HIV infectivity. Concurrently, we will learn about the chemical and biological techniques used to det

Subjects

Glycans | glycobiology | glycosylation patterns | glycoproteins | glycan metabolism | glycosylated proteins | protein-glycan interactions | high-throughput glycan arrays | O-glycans | N-linked glycosylation | glycosyl-amino acids | Metabolic glycan labeling | synthetic antigens

License

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7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer),

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | human biology | human biology | inherited diseases | inherited diseases | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | human genetics | human genetics | human diseases | human diseases | infectious agents | infectious agents | infectious diseases | infectious diseases

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.014 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.014 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.014 focuses on the application of these fundamental principles, toward an understanding of microorganisms as geochemical agents responsible for the evolution and renewal of the biosphere and of their role in human health The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.014 focuses on the application of these fundamental principles, toward an understanding of microorganisms as geochemical agents responsible for the evolution and renewal of the biosphere and of their role in human health

Subjects

microorganisms | microorganisms | geochemistry | geochemistry | geochemical agents | geochemical agents | biosphere | biosphere | bacterial genetics | bacterial genetics | carbon metabolism | carbon metabolism | energy metabolism | energy metabolism | productivity | productivity | biogeochemical cycles | biogeochemical cycles | molecular evolution | molecular evolution | population genetics | population genetics | evolution | evolution | population growth | population growth | biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | ecology | ecology | communities | communities

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.346 Virus-host Interactions in Infectious Diseases (MIT)

Description

Co-evolution and adaptation between viruses and humans are often portrayed as a zero-sum biological arms race. Viruses enter host cells equipped with an array of mechanisms to evade the host defense responses and replicate. The rapid rate of mutation of viruses permits evolution of various methodologies for infection, which in turn drive development of non-specific but highly effective host mechanisms to restrict infection. This class will discuss the varied solutions each side has developed as a means for survival. We will use examples drawn from human disease-causing pathogens that contribute seriously to the global health burden, including HIV, influenza and dengue virus. Primary research papers will be discussed to help students learn to pose scientific questions and design and conduct

Subjects

virus | host | infection | protein-protein interactions | host mimicry | intra-cellular trafficking | host-cell machinery | signaling pathways | antiviral proteins | HIV | influenza | dengue virus | biotechnology | vaccine development | host sensors | IFN production | Secreted IFN | filoviruses | hCMV | IFITM proteins

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT) 7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.012 focuses on the exploration of current research in cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, genomics, and molecular medicine.AcknowledgmentsThe study materials, problem sets, and quiz materials used during Fall 2004 for The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.012 focuses on the exploration of current research in cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, genomics, and molecular medicine.AcknowledgmentsThe study materials, problem sets, and quiz materials used during Fall 2004 for

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-4 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about the Cultures of Food (MIT) 21W.730-4 Writing on Contemporary Issues: Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about the Cultures of Food (MIT)

Description

"What people do with food is an act that reveals how they construe the world." - Marcella Hazan, The Classic Italian Cookbook If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. In this class, we explore many of the fascinating issues that surround food as both material fact and personal and cultural symbol. We read essays by Toni Morrison, Michael Pollan, Wendell Berry, and others on such topics as family meals, eating as an "agricultural act" (Berry), slow food, and food's ability to awaken us to "our own powers of enjoyment" (M. F. K. Fisher). We will also read Pollan's most recent book, In Defense of Food, and discuss the issues it raises as well as "What people do with food is an act that reveals how they construe the world." - Marcella Hazan, The Classic Italian Cookbook If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. In this class, we explore many of the fascinating issues that surround food as both material fact and personal and cultural symbol. We read essays by Toni Morrison, Michael Pollan, Wendell Berry, and others on such topics as family meals, eating as an "agricultural act" (Berry), slow food, and food's ability to awaken us to "our own powers of enjoyment" (M. F. K. Fisher). We will also read Pollan's most recent book, In Defense of Food, and discuss the issues it raises as well as

Subjects

food | food | hunger | hunger | good calories | good calories | lipid hypothesis | lipid hypothesis | diet | diet | nutrients | nutrients | unhappy meals | unhappy meals | nutritionism | nutritionism | cuisine | cuisine | carbohydrates | carbohydrates | fats | fats | proteins | proteins | water | water | plants | plants | animals | animals | fungus or fermented products like alcohol | fungus or fermented products like alcohol | human cultures | human cultures | hunting and gathering | hunting and gathering | farming | farming | ranching | ranching | fishing | fishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT) 7.012 Introduction to Biology (MIT)

Description

All three courses: 7.012, 7.013 and 7.014 cover the same core material which includes: the fundamental principles of biochemistry as they apply to introductory biology, genetics, molecular biology, basic recombinant DNA technology, and gene regulation.In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material, described below. Note: All three versions require a familiarity with some basic chemistry. For details, see the Chemistry Self-evaluation.7.012 focuses on cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, and includes an exploration into current research in cancer, genomics, and molecular medicine. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of cells, human genetics and diseases, infectious agents, cancer, immunology, molecular All three courses: 7.012, 7.013 and 7.014 cover the same core material which includes: the fundamental principles of biochemistry as they apply to introductory biology, genetics, molecular biology, basic recombinant DNA technology, and gene regulation.In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material, described below. Note: All three versions require a familiarity with some basic chemistry. For details, see the Chemistry Self-evaluation.7.012 focuses on cell biology, immunology, neurobiology, and includes an exploration into current research in cancer, genomics, and molecular medicine. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of cells, human genetics and diseases, infectious agents, cancer, immunology, molecular

Subjects

amino acids | amino acids | biochemistry | biochemistry | cancer | cancer | cell biology | cell biology | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | DNA | DNA | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | gene regulation | gene regulation | gene structure | gene structure | genetics | genetics | genomics | genomics | immunology | immunology | molecular biology | molecular biology | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | mRNA | mRNA | nervous system | nervous system | neurobiology | neurobiology | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | protein localization | protein localization | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | proteins | proteins | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | replication | replication | ribosome | ribosome | RNA | RNA | stem cells | stem cells | transcription | transcription | translation | translation | virology | virology | biology | biology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.530 Cellular and Molecular Computation (MIT) 9.530 Cellular and Molecular Computation (MIT)

Description

Life as an emergent property of networks of chemical reactions involving proteins and nucleic acids. Mathematical theories of metabolism, gene regulation, signal transduction, chemotaxis, excitability, motility, mitosis, development, and immunity. Applications to directed molecular evolution, DNA computing, and metabolic and genetic engineering. Life as an emergent property of networks of chemical reactions involving proteins and nucleic acids. Mathematical theories of metabolism, gene regulation, signal transduction, chemotaxis, excitability, motility, mitosis, development, and immunity. Applications to directed molecular evolution, DNA computing, and metabolic and genetic engineering.

Subjects

emergent | emergent | network | network | chemical reactions | chemical reactions | proteins | proteins | nucleic acids | nucleic acids | metabolism | metabolism | gene regulation | gene regulation | signal transduction | signal transduction | chemotaxis | chemotaxis | excitability | excitability | motility | motility | mitosis | mitosis | development | development | immunity | immunity | molecular evolution | molecular evolution | DNA computing | DNA computing | metabolic | metabolic | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | Neural networks | Neural networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Membrane proteins and drug development

Description

Dr Liz Carpenter talks about her research on membrane proteins and drug development. Membrane proteins are the gateways to our cells - with nutrients, waste products, and even DNA and proteins entering and leaving cells via these tightly controlled proteins. Drugs often target membrane proteins; therefore, understanding their molecular structure helps us design better drugs. Dr Liz Carpenter uses X-ray crystallography to solve membrane protein structures. This information is then used to improve treatments for heart disease and neurological diseases. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

membrane proteins | protein structure | high-throughput | drug discovery | ion channel | x-ray crystallography | membrane proteins | protein structure | high-throughput | drug discovery | ion channel | x-ray crystallography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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