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16.83X Space Systems Engineering (MIT) 16.83X Space Systems Engineering (MIT)

Description

Space Systems Engineering (16.83X) is the astronautical capstone course option in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.  Between Spring 2002 and Spring 2003, the course was offered in a 3-semester format, using a Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate (C-D-I-O) teaching model. 16.83X is shorthand for the three course numbers: 16.83, 16.831, and 16.832. The first semester (16.83) is the Conceive-Design phase of the project, which results in a detailed system design, but precedes assembly.  The second semester (16.831) is the Implement phase, and involves building the students' system.  The final semester (16.832) is the Operate phase, in which the system is tested and readied to perform in its intended environment. This year's project obj Space Systems Engineering (16.83X) is the astronautical capstone course option in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.  Between Spring 2002 and Spring 2003, the course was offered in a 3-semester format, using a Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate (C-D-I-O) teaching model. 16.83X is shorthand for the three course numbers: 16.83, 16.831, and 16.832. The first semester (16.83) is the Conceive-Design phase of the project, which results in a detailed system design, but precedes assembly.  The second semester (16.831) is the Implement phase, and involves building the students' system.  The final semester (16.832) is the Operate phase, in which the system is tested and readied to perform in its intended environment. This year's project obj

Subjects

space systems engineering | space systems engineering | CDIO | CDIO | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | trajectory analysis | trajectory analysis | entry dynamics | entry dynamics | propulsion | propulsion | power | power | structural design | structural design | avionics | avionics | thermal control | thermal control | environmental control | environmental control | human factors | human factors | support systems | support systems | weight estimates | weight estimates | cost estimates | cost estimates | student projects | student projects | integrated vehicle design | integrated vehicle design | team communication | team communication | electromagnetic formation flight | electromagnetic formation flight | satellites | satellites | TARR preparation | TARR preparation | subsystem design | subsystem design | subsystem prototyping | subsystem prototyping | trade analysis and requirements review | trade analysis and requirements review

License

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SP.725 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) SP.725 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | co-creation | co-creation

License

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4.510 Digital Design Fabrication (MIT) 4.510 Digital Design Fabrication (MIT)

Description

This course will guide graduate students through the process of using rapid prototyping and CAD/CAM devices in a studio environment. The class has a theoretical focus on machine use within the process of design. Each student is expected to have completed one graduate level of design computing with a full understanding of solid modeling in CAD. Students are also expected to have completed at least one graduate design studio. This course will guide graduate students through the process of using rapid prototyping and CAD/CAM devices in a studio environment. The class has a theoretical focus on machine use within the process of design. Each student is expected to have completed one graduate level of design computing with a full understanding of solid modeling in CAD. Students are also expected to have completed at least one graduate design studio.

Subjects

digital fabrication | digital fabrication | design | design | cad | cad | cam | cam | digital manufacturing | digital manufacturing | assembly | assembly | design geometry | design geometry | fabrication | fabrication | drafting | drafting | modeling | modeling | printing | printing | waterjet cutting | waterjet cutting | cnc manufacturing | cnc manufacturing | generative fabrication | generative fabrication | construction grammars | construction grammars | prototyping | prototyping | boston water taxi | boston water taxi

License

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EC.S06 Prototypes to Products (MIT) EC.S06 Prototypes to Products (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. For students and teams who have started a sustainable-development project in D-Lab (EC.701J or EC.720J), Product Engineering Processes (2.009), or elsewhere, this class provides a setting to continue developing projects for field implementation. Topics covered include prototyping techniques, materials selection, design-for-manufacturing, field-testing, and project management. All classwork will directly relate to the students' projects, and the instructor will consult on the projects during weekly lab time. There are no exams. Teams are encouraged to enroll together. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. For students and teams who have started a sustainable-development project in D-Lab (EC.701J or EC.720J), Product Engineering Processes (2.009), or elsewhere, this class provides a setting to continue developing projects for field implementation. Topics covered include prototyping techniques, materials selection, design-for-manufacturing, field-testing, and project management. All classwork will directly relate to the students' projects, and the instructor will consult on the projects during weekly lab time. There are no exams. Teams are encouraged to enroll together.

Subjects

solar water disinfection | solar water disinfection | SODIS | SODIS | internet kiosk | internet kiosk | developing nation | developing nation | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | international development | international development | prototyping | prototyping | product design | product design | Gantt chart | Gantt chart | Pert chart | Pert chart | SWOT | SWOT | funding | funding | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship

License

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SP.776 Design for Demining (MIT) SP.776 Design for Demining (MIT)

Description

Humanitarian Demining is the process of detecting, removing and disposing of landmines. Millions of landmines are buried in more than 80 countries resulting in 20,000 civilian victims every year. MIT Design for Demining is a design course that spans the entire product design and development process from identification of needs and idea generation to prototyping and blast testing to manufacture and deployment. Technical, business and customer aspects are addressed. Students learn about demining while they design, develop and deliver devices to aid the demining community. Past students have invented or improved hand tools, protective gear, safety equipment, educational graphics and teaching materials. Some tools designed in previous years are in use worldwide in the thousands. Course work is Humanitarian Demining is the process of detecting, removing and disposing of landmines. Millions of landmines are buried in more than 80 countries resulting in 20,000 civilian victims every year. MIT Design for Demining is a design course that spans the entire product design and development process from identification of needs and idea generation to prototyping and blast testing to manufacture and deployment. Technical, business and customer aspects are addressed. Students learn about demining while they design, develop and deliver devices to aid the demining community. Past students have invented or improved hand tools, protective gear, safety equipment, educational graphics and teaching materials. Some tools designed in previous years are in use worldwide in the thousands. Course work is

Subjects

humanitarian demining | humanitarian demining | landmines | landmines | landmine detection | landmine detection | landmine removal | landmine removal | landmine disposal | landmine disposal | landmines in 80 countries | landmines in 80 countries | 20 | 000 civilian victims per year | 20 | 000 civilian victims per year | MIT Design for Demining | MIT Design for Demining | product design | product design | development process | development process | identification of needs | identification of needs | idea generation | idea generation | prototyping | prototyping | blast testing | blast testing | manufacture | manufacture | deployment | deployment | demining community | demining community | hand tools | hand tools | protective gear | protective gear | safety equipment | safety equipment | educational graphics | educational graphics | teaching materials | teaching materials | field trip | field trip | US Army base | US Army base | demining training | demining training

License

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CMS.611J Creating Video Games (MIT) CMS.611J Creating Video Games (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions, AV lectures. CMS.611J / 6.073 Creating Video Games is a class that introduces students to the complexities of working in small, multidisciplinary teams to develop video games. Students will learn creative design and production methods, working together in small teams to design, develop, and thoroughly test their own original digital games. Design iteration across all aspects of video game development (game design, audio design, visual aesthetics, fiction and programming) will be stressed. Students will also be required to focus test their games, and will need to support and challenge their game design decisions with appropriate focus testing and data analysis. Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions, AV lectures. CMS.611J / 6.073 Creating Video Games is a class that introduces students to the complexities of working in small, multidisciplinary teams to develop video games. Students will learn creative design and production methods, working together in small teams to design, develop, and thoroughly test their own original digital games. Design iteration across all aspects of video game development (game design, audio design, visual aesthetics, fiction and programming) will be stressed. Students will also be required to focus test their games, and will need to support and challenge their game design decisions with appropriate focus testing and data analysis.

Subjects

CMS.611 | CMS.611 | game | game | videogame | videogame | software | software | prototyping | prototyping | play | play | test | test | scrum | scrum | agile | agile | code | code | project management | project management | game design | game design

License

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16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT) 16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline. Acknowledgements This course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline. Acknowledgements This course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teaching,

Subjects

engineering design | engineering design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | manufacturing | manufacturing | testing | testing | system components | system components | complex structural parts | complex structural parts | hand sketching | hand sketching | CAD | CAD | CAD modeling | CAD modeling | CAE | CAE | CAE analysis | CAE analysis | CAM programming | CAM programming | CNC | CNC | CNC machining | CNC machining | computer aided design | computer aided design | computer aided | computer aided | structual testing | structual testing | multiobjective design | multiobjective design | optimization | optimization | computational methods | computational methods | tools | tools | design process | design process | design competition | design competition | active learning | active learning | hands-on | hands-on | human creativity | human creativity | holistic | holistic | solidworks | solidworks | finite element | finite element | FEM | FEM | FEM analysis | FEM analysis | COSMOS | COSMOS | omax | omax | presentation | presentation | CDIO | CDIO

License

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MAS.S63 Engineering Health: Towards the Tricorder (MIT) MAS.S63 Engineering Health: Towards the Tricorder (MIT)

Description

Students will learn to fabricate, remix, and design detection and monitoring devices for health following the core focus of the Tricorder: a portable, handheld diagnostic device which can brings health solutions to consumers at home or in remote parts of the world. Inspired by the Tricorder X-Prize (with a purse of $10 million), students will aim to create specific component technologies that integrate into a comprehensive Tricorder mechanism capable of reading vital signs and specific disease biomarker detection. Component areas will include optical, electric, biochemical, and molecular diagnostics. Students will learn to fabricate, remix, and design detection and monitoring devices for health following the core focus of the Tricorder: a portable, handheld diagnostic device which can brings health solutions to consumers at home or in remote parts of the world. Inspired by the Tricorder X-Prize (with a purse of $10 million), students will aim to create specific component technologies that integrate into a comprehensive Tricorder mechanism capable of reading vital signs and specific disease biomarker detection. Component areas will include optical, electric, biochemical, and molecular diagnostics.

Subjects

Medical | Medical | tricorder | tricorder | prototyping | prototyping | diagnostic | diagnostic | health | health | microscopy | microscopy | imaging | imaging | antibodies | antibodies | Crusher | Crusher | nanoparticles | nanoparticles | sensor | sensor | pulse | pulse | bones | bones | McCoy | McCoy | biomarker | biomarker | nerd | nerd | microfluid | microfluid | Beverly | Beverly | immunoassay | immunoassay | immune | immune | telemedicine | telemedicine

License

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CMS.611J Creating Video Games (MIT) CMS.611J Creating Video Games (MIT)

Description

Students will learn creative design and production methods, working together in small teams to design, develop, and thoroughly test their own original digital games. Design iteration across all aspects of video game development (game design, audio design, visual aesthetics, fiction, and programming) will be stressed. Students will also be required to focus test their games, and will need to support and challenge their game design decisions with appropriate focus testing and data analysis. Students will learn creative design and production methods, working together in small teams to design, develop, and thoroughly test their own original digital games. Design iteration across all aspects of video game development (game design, audio design, visual aesthetics, fiction, and programming) will be stressed. Students will also be required to focus test their games, and will need to support and challenge their game design decisions with appropriate focus testing and data analysis.

Subjects

game | game | videogame | videogame | software | software | prototyping | prototyping | play | play | test | test | scrum | scrum | agile | agile | code | code | smell | smell | postmortem | postmortem | ennui | ennui | amnesident | amnesident

License

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4.131 Architectural Design, Level II: Material Essence: The Glass House (MIT) 4.131 Architectural Design, Level II: Material Essence: The Glass House (MIT)

Description

The theme that unites the Level II studios in the fall semester is a focus upon the 'making of architecture and built form' as a tectonic, technical and materially driven endeavor. It is a design investigation that is rooted in a larger culture of materiality and the associated phenomena, but a study of the language and production of built form as an integrated response to the conceptual proposition of the project. The studio will look to works of architecture where the material tectonic and its resultant technology or fabrication become instrumental to the realization of the ideas, in whatever form they may take. This becomes the 'art of technology' -- suggesting a level of innovation and creative manipulation as part of the design process to transform material into a composition of b The theme that unites the Level II studios in the fall semester is a focus upon the 'making of architecture and built form' as a tectonic, technical and materially driven endeavor. It is a design investigation that is rooted in a larger culture of materiality and the associated phenomena, but a study of the language and production of built form as an integrated response to the conceptual proposition of the project. The studio will look to works of architecture where the material tectonic and its resultant technology or fabrication become instrumental to the realization of the ideas, in whatever form they may take. This becomes the 'art of technology' -- suggesting a level of innovation and creative manipulation as part of the design process to transform material into a composition of b

Subjects

architecture | architecture | tectonics | tectonics | materials | materials | relationships | relationships | interventions | interventions | physics | physics | place and space | place and space | wellesley campus | wellesley campus | thomson island | thomson island | glass | glass | structures | structures | advanced design | advanced design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | environmental control | environmental control | "art of technology" | "art of technology" | fabrication | fabrication | design from detailing | design from detailing | built form | built form | technical | technical | design investigation | design investigation | materiality | materiality | art of technology | art of technology | glasshouse | glasshouse

License

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16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT) 16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline. Acknowledgements This course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teachin Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid prototyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline. Acknowledgements This course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teachin

Subjects

engineering design | engineering design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | manufacturing | manufacturing | testing | testing | system components | system components | complex structural parts | complex structural parts | hand sketching | hand sketching | CAD | CAD | CAD modeling | CAD modeling | CAE | CAE | CAE analysis | CAE analysis | CAM programming | CAM programming | CNC | CNC | CNC machining | CNC machining | computer aided design | computer aided design | computer aided | computer aided | structual testing | structual testing | multiobjective design | multiobjective design | optimization | optimization | computational methods | computational methods | tools | tools | design process | design process | design competition | design competition | active learning | active learning | hands-on | hands-on | human creativity | human creativity | holistic | holistic | solidworks | solidworks | finite element | finite element | FEM | FEM | FEM analysis | FEM analysis | COSMOS | COSMOS | omax | omax | presentation | presentation | CDIO | CDIO | structural testing | structural testing

License

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6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT) 6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT)

Description

6.831/6.813 examines human-computer interaction in the context of graphical user interfaces. The course covers human capabilities, design principles, prototyping techniques, evaluation techniques, and the implementation of graphical user interfaces. Deliverables include short programming assignments and a semester-long group project. Students taking the graduate version also have readings from current literature and additional assignments. 6.831/6.813 examines human-computer interaction in the context of graphical user interfaces. The course covers human capabilities, design principles, prototyping techniques, evaluation techniques, and the implementation of graphical user interfaces. Deliverables include short programming assignments and a semester-long group project. Students taking the graduate version also have readings from current literature and additional assignments.

Subjects

human-computer interaction | human-computer interaction | user interfaces | user interfaces | human capabilities | human capabilities | design principles | design principles | prototyping techniques | prototyping techniques | evaluation techniques | evaluation techniques

License

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CMS.608 Game Design (MIT) CMS.608 Game Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course provides practical instruction in the design and analysis of non-digital games. Students cover the texts, tools, references and historical context to analyze and compare game designs across a variety of genres, including sports, game shows, games of chance, card games, schoolyard games, board games, and role–playing games. In teams, students design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games to understand the interaction and evolution of game rules. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course provides practical instruction in the design and analysis of non-digital games. Students cover the texts, tools, references and historical context to analyze and compare game designs across a variety of genres, including sports, game shows, games of chance, card games, schoolyard games, board games, and role–playing games. In teams, students design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games to understand the interaction and evolution of game rules. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.

Subjects

games | games | puzzles | puzzles | narrative | narrative | playtestin | playtestin | chance | chance | competition | competition | strategy | strategy | rules | rules | gambling | gambling | emergence | emergence | progression | progression | randomness | randomness | cooperation | cooperation | iterative design | iterative design | prototyping | prototyping | game mechanics | game mechanics | aesthetics | aesthetics

License

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Lecture 4: Prototyping Lecture 4: Prototyping

Description

Description: Before games come to market, they undergo several tests: Are there technical glitches? Can players easily get started? Is the gameplay what the designers intended? Sara Verrilli discusses how and why to conduct focus testing. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: playtesting, prototyping, strategy, user feedback, technical testing, design specification, player experience, focus testing, usability testing, target audience, accessibility, marketing, surveys, data collection, board games, video games, card games, teamwork, diplomacy, dynamic, aesthetic, mechanicTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Before games come to market, they undergo several tests: Are there technical glitches? Can players easily get started? Is the gameplay what the designers intended? Sara Verrilli discusses how and why to conduct focus testing. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: playtesting, prototyping, strategy, user feedback, technical testing, design specification, player experience, focus testing, usability testing, target audience, accessibility, marketing, surveys, data collection, board games, video games, card games, teamwork, diplomacy, dynamic, aesthetic, mechanicTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

playtesting | playtesting | prototyping | prototyping | strategy | strategy | user feedback | user feedback | technical testing | technical testing | design specification | design specification | player experience | player experience | focus testing | focus testing | usability testing | usability testing | target audience | target audience | accessibility | accessibility | marketing | marketing | surveys | surveys | data collection | data collection | board games | board games | video games | video games | card games | card games | teamwork | teamwork | diplomacy | diplomacy | dynamic | dynamic | aesthetic | aesthetic | mechanic | mechanic

License

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Lecture 21: Games as Teaching Tools Lecture 21: Games as Teaching Tools

Description

Description: A panel of game developers from the Education Arcade and Learning Games Network talk about their research, effectively connecting learning and games, engaging a target audience, defining and evaluating success, and common design pitfalls. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Konstantin Mitgutsch, Dan Roy, Scot OsterweilKeywords: education, target audience, accessibility, literacy, user feedback, evaluation, playtesting, prototyping, usability, math, science, language, puzzles, teaching, pedagogy, learningTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: A panel of game developers from the Education Arcade and Learning Games Network talk about their research, effectively connecting learning and games, engaging a target audience, defining and evaluating success, and common design pitfalls. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Konstantin Mitgutsch, Dan Roy, Scot OsterweilKeywords: education, target audience, accessibility, literacy, user feedback, evaluation, playtesting, prototyping, usability, math, science, language, puzzles, teaching, pedagogy, learningTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

education | education | target audience | target audience | accessibility | accessibility | literacy | literacy | user feedback | user feedback | evaluation | evaluation | playtesting | playtesting | prototyping | prototyping | usability | usability | math | math | science | science | language | language | puzzles | puzzles | teaching | teaching | pedagogy | pedagogy | learning | learning

License

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11.522 Research Seminar on Urban Information Systems (MIT) 11.522 Research Seminar on Urban Information Systems (MIT)

Description

Seminar participants and invited guests will lead critical discussions of current literature and ongoing research. Each student will be responsible for identifying, reviewing, and presenting one structured discussion of articles from the current literature that are relevant to their research topic. The remaining time will be spent working on individual projects or thesis proposals. This fall, the seminar will focus on the following core issues that underlie most implementations of urban information systems and decision support tools: the sustainable acquisition and representation of urban knowledge; the emergent technological infrastructure for supporting metropolitan decision-making; and the innovative organizational and institutional arrangements that can take advantage of modern urban i Seminar participants and invited guests will lead critical discussions of current literature and ongoing research. Each student will be responsible for identifying, reviewing, and presenting one structured discussion of articles from the current literature that are relevant to their research topic. The remaining time will be spent working on individual projects or thesis proposals. This fall, the seminar will focus on the following core issues that underlie most implementations of urban information systems and decision support tools: the sustainable acquisition and representation of urban knowledge; the emergent technological infrastructure for supporting metropolitan decision-making; and the innovative organizational and institutional arrangements that can take advantage of modern urban i

Subjects

communication technologies | communication technologies | geographic information systems | geographic information systems | multimedia technologies | multimedia technologies | institutional analysis | institutional analysis | prototyping | prototyping | urban planning tools | urban planning tools | metropolitan information infrastructure | metropolitan information infrastructure | emergent technological infrastructure | emergent technological infrastructure | representing urban knowledge | representing urban knowledge

License

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15.783J Product Design and Development (MIT) 15.783J Product Design and Development (MIT)

Description

Product Design and Development is a project-based course that covers modern tools and methods for product design and development. The cornerstone is a project in which teams of management, engineering, and industrial design students conceive, design and prototype a physical product. Class sessions are conducted in workshop mode and employ cases and hands-on exercises to reinforce the key ideas. Topics include identifying customer needs, concept generation, product architecture, industrial design, and design-for-manufacturing. Product Design and Development is a project-based course that covers modern tools and methods for product design and development. The cornerstone is a project in which teams of management, engineering, and industrial design students conceive, design and prototype a physical product. Class sessions are conducted in workshop mode and employ cases and hands-on exercises to reinforce the key ideas. Topics include identifying customer needs, concept generation, product architecture, industrial design, and design-for-manufacturing.

Subjects

product design | product design | product development | product development | prototyping | prototyping | machining | machining | fabrication | fabrication | design | design | CAD/CAM | CAD/CAM | marketing | marketing | product placement | product placement | innovation | innovation | marketplace analysis | marketplace analysis | industrial design | industrial design | modern design | modern design | design tools | design tools | 15.783 | 15.783 | 2.739 | 2.739

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21W.789 Communicating with Mobile Technology (MIT) 21W.789 Communicating with Mobile Technology (MIT)

Description

Students work in small collaborative design teams to propose, build, and document a semester-long project focused on mobile applications for cell phones. Additional assignments include creating several small mobile applications such as context-aware mobile media capture and games. Students document their work through a series of written and oral proposals, progress reports, and final reports. This course covers the basics of J2ME and explores mobile imaging and media creation, GPS location, user-centered design, usability testing, and prototyping. Java experience is recommended. Students work in small collaborative design teams to propose, build, and document a semester-long project focused on mobile applications for cell phones. Additional assignments include creating several small mobile applications such as context-aware mobile media capture and games. Students document their work through a series of written and oral proposals, progress reports, and final reports. This course covers the basics of J2ME and explores mobile imaging and media creation, GPS location, user-centered design, usability testing, and prototyping. Java experience is recommended.

Subjects

smartphone applications | smartphone applications | app building | app building | programming | programming | android | android | iphone | iphone | project management | project management | design | design | mobile imaging | mobile imaging | media creation | media creation | GBS location | GBS location | user design | user design | usability testing | usability testing | prototyping | prototyping

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6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT) 6.831 User Interface Design and Implementation (MIT)

Description

6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, perception, motor skills, color, attention, and errors) and using those capabilities to drive design techniques: task analysis, user-centered design, iterative design, usability guidelines, interaction styles, and graphic design principles. Implementation: Techniques for building user interfaces, including low-fidelity prototypes, Wizard of Oz, and other prototyping tools; input models, output models, model-view-controller, layout, constraints, and toolkits. Evaluation: Techniques for evaluating and measuring interface usability, including heuristic evaluation, predicti 6.831 introduces the principles of user interface development, focusing on three key areas: Design: How to design good user interfaces, starting with human capabilities (including the human information processor model, perception, motor skills, color, attention, and errors) and using those capabilities to drive design techniques: task analysis, user-centered design, iterative design, usability guidelines, interaction styles, and graphic design principles. Implementation: Techniques for building user interfaces, including low-fidelity prototypes, Wizard of Oz, and other prototyping tools; input models, output models, model-view-controller, layout, constraints, and toolkits. Evaluation: Techniques for evaluating and measuring interface usability, including heuristic evaluation, predicti

Subjects

human-computer interfaces | human-computer interfaces | human capabilities | human capabilities | human information processor | human information processor | perception | perception | Fitts's Law | Fitts's Law | color | color | hearing | hearing | task analysis | task analysis | user-centered design | user-centered design | iterative design | iterative design | low-fidelity prototyping | low-fidelity prototyping | heuristic evaluation | heuristic evaluation | keystroke-level models | keystroke-level models | formative evaluation | formative evaluation | input models | input models | output models | output models | model-view-controller | model-view-controller | toolkits | toolkits | programming project | programming project | GUI | GUI | Java | Java

License

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EC.722 Special Topics at Edgerton Center:Developing World Prosthetics (MIT) EC.722 Special Topics at Edgerton Center:Developing World Prosthetics (MIT)

Description

D-Lab World Prosthetics is a collaboration between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Jaipur Foot Organization to improve the design, manufacture, and distribution of rehabilitation devices in the developing world. The course welcomes individuals interested in physical rehabilitation to work on multidisciplinary teams of students with bioengineering, mechanical engineering, material science, and medical or pre-medical backgrounds. Students will learn about the basics of human walking, different types of gait disabilities, as well as the technologies that seek to address those disabilities. Patient perspectives and current research areas are presented. Lecture topics focus on lower-limb disabilities, including polio and above-knee and below-knee amputation, and will cover bot D-Lab World Prosthetics is a collaboration between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Jaipur Foot Organization to improve the design, manufacture, and distribution of rehabilitation devices in the developing world. The course welcomes individuals interested in physical rehabilitation to work on multidisciplinary teams of students with bioengineering, mechanical engineering, material science, and medical or pre-medical backgrounds. Students will learn about the basics of human walking, different types of gait disabilities, as well as the technologies that seek to address those disabilities. Patient perspectives and current research areas are presented. Lecture topics focus on lower-limb disabilities, including polio and above-knee and below-knee amputation, and will cover bot

Subjects

jaipur foot | jaipur foot | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | amputation | amputation | amputee | amputee | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | co-creation | co-creation | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | orthotics | orthotics | prosthesis | prosthesis | prosthetic technology | prosthetic technology | pediatric extendable prosthetic | pediatric extendable prosthetic | cosmetic shell | cosmetic shell | vacuum casting | vacuum casting

License

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EC.S06 Design for Demining (MIT) EC.S06 Design for Demining (MIT)

Description

Humanitarian Demining is the process of detecting, removing and disposing of landmines. Millions of landmines are buried in more than 80 countries resulting in more than 10,000 civilian victims every year. MIT Design for Demining is a design course that spans the entire product design and development process from identification of needs and idea generation to prototyping and blast testing to manufacture and deployment. Technical, business and customer aspects are addressed. Students learn about demining while they design, develop and deliver devices to aid the demining community. Past students have invented or improved hand tools, protective gear, safety equipment, educational graphics and teaching materials. Some tools designed in previous years are in use worldwide in the thousands. Cour Humanitarian Demining is the process of detecting, removing and disposing of landmines. Millions of landmines are buried in more than 80 countries resulting in more than 10,000 civilian victims every year. MIT Design for Demining is a design course that spans the entire product design and development process from identification of needs and idea generation to prototyping and blast testing to manufacture and deployment. Technical, business and customer aspects are addressed. Students learn about demining while they design, develop and deliver devices to aid the demining community. Past students have invented or improved hand tools, protective gear, safety equipment, educational graphics and teaching materials. Some tools designed in previous years are in use worldwide in the thousands. Cour

Subjects

SP.776 | SP.776 | SP.786 | SP.786 | humanitarian demining | humanitarian demining | landmines | landmines | landmine detection | landmine detection | landmine removal | landmine removal | landmine disposal | landmine disposal | landmines in 80 countries | landmines in 80 countries | 20 | 000 civilian victims per year | 20 | 000 civilian victims per year | MIT Design for Demining | MIT Design for Demining | product design | product design | development process | development process | identification of needs | identification of needs | idea generation | idea generation | prototyping | prototyping | blast testing | blast testing | manufacture | manufacture | deployment | deployment | demining community | demining community | hand tools | hand tools | protective gear | protective gear | safety equipment | safety equipment | educational graphics | educational graphics | teaching materials | teaching materials | field trip | field trip | US Army base | US Army base | demining training | demining training

License

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HST.410J Projects in Microscale Engineering for the Life Sciences (MIT) HST.410J Projects in Microscale Engineering for the Life Sciences (MIT)

Description

This course is a project-based introduction to manipulating and characterizing cells and biological molecules using microfabricated tools. It is designed for first year undergraduate students. In the first half of the term, students perform laboratory exercises designed to introduce (1) the design, manufacture, and use of microfluidic channels, (2) techniques for sorting and manipulating cells and biomolecules, and (3) making quantitative measurements using optical detection and fluorescent labeling. In the second half of the term, students work in small groups to design and test a microfluidic device to solve a real-world problem of their choosing. Includes exercises in written and oral communication and team building. This course is a project-based introduction to manipulating and characterizing cells and biological molecules using microfabricated tools. It is designed for first year undergraduate students. In the first half of the term, students perform laboratory exercises designed to introduce (1) the design, manufacture, and use of microfluidic channels, (2) techniques for sorting and manipulating cells and biomolecules, and (3) making quantitative measurements using optical detection and fluorescent labeling. In the second half of the term, students work in small groups to design and test a microfluidic device to solve a real-world problem of their choosing. Includes exercises in written and oral communication and team building.

Subjects

HST.410 | HST.410 | 6.07 | 6.07 | cell manipulation | cell manipulation | microchips | microchips | lithography | lithography | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | optical imaging of cells | optical imaging of cells | cell sorting | cell sorting | microfluidics | microfluidics | osmosis | osmosis | diffusion | diffusion | microfabrication | microfabrication | models of diffusion | models of diffusion | laminar flow | laminar flow | MATLAB data analysis | MATLAB data analysis | cell traps | cell traps | experimental design | experimental design | cytometry techniques | cytometry techniques | computer simulation of neural behavior | computer simulation of neural behavior | casting PDMS | casting PDMS | coulter counter | coulter counter | plasma bonding | plasma bonding

License

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CMS.608 Game Design (MIT) CMS.608 Game Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is built around practical instruction in the design and analysis of non-­digital games. It provides students the texts, tools, references, and historical context to analyze and compare game designs across a variety of genres. In teams, students design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games to better understand the interaction and evolution of game rules. Covers various genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, card games, schoolyard games, board games, and role-­playing games. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course is built around practical instruction in the design and analysis of non-­digital games. It provides students the texts, tools, references, and historical context to analyze and compare game designs across a variety of genres. In teams, students design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games to better understand the interaction and evolution of game rules. Covers various genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, card games, schoolyard games, board games, and role-­playing games.

Subjects

game | game | design | design | board | board | cards | cards | sport | sport | prototyping | prototyping | dice | dice | usability | usability | constraint | constraint | playground | playground | stratego | stratego | strategy | strategy | random | random | choice | choice | play | play | tabletop | tabletop | monopoly | monopoly | indoor | indoor | mechanic | mechanic | simulation | simulation | pitch | pitch | strategery | strategery | cooperative | cooperative | social | social | lockbox | lockbox | pandemic | pandemic | rules | rules | indie | indie

License

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SP.718 Special Topics at Edgerton Center: D-Lab Health: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) SP.718 Special Topics at Edgerton Center: D-Lab Health: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides multi-disciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break and work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address the challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides multi-disciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break and work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address the challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | co-creation | co-creation | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | medical ethics | medical ethics | infant mortality | infant mortality

License

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16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT) 16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping (MIT)

Description

This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid protyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline.AcknowledgmentsThis course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, Class of '72 Fund for Educationa This course provides students with an opportunity to conceive, design and implement a product, using rapid protyping methods and computer-aid tools. The first of two phases challenges each student team to meet a set of design requirements and constraints for a structural component. A course of iteration, fabrication, and validation completes this manual design cycle. During the second phase, each team conducts design optimization using structural analysis software, with their phase one prototype as a baseline.AcknowledgmentsThis course is made possible thanks to a grant by the alumni sponsored Teaching and Education Enhancement Program (Class of '51 Fund for Excellence in Education, Class of '55 Fund for Excellence in Teaching, Class of '72 Fund for Educationa

Subjects

engineering design | engineering design | rapid prototyping | rapid prototyping | manufacturing | manufacturing | testing | testing | system components | system components | complex structural parts | complex structural parts | hand sketching | hand sketching | CAD | CAD | CAD modeling | CAD modeling | CAE | CAE | CAE analysis | CAE analysis | CAM programming | CAM programming | CNC | CNC | CNC machining | CNC machining | computer aided design | computer aided design | computer aided | computer aided | structual testing | structual testing | multiobjective design | multiobjective design | optimization | optimization | computational methods | computational methods | tools | tools | design process | design process | design competition | design competition | active learning | active learning | hands-on | hands-on | human creativity | human creativity | holistic | holistic | solidworks | solidworks | finite element | finite element | FEM | FEM | FEM analysis | FEM analysis | COSMOS | COSMOS | omax | omax | presentation | presentation | CDIO | CDIO

License

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