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24.08J Philosophical Issues in Brain Science (MIT) 24.08J Philosophical Issues in Brain Science (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate or are they acquired by experience? And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'? Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course includes guest lectures by philosophers and cognitive scientists. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate or are they acquired by experience? And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'? Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course includes guest lectures by philosophers and cognitive scientists.

Subjects

brain | brain | philosophy | philosophy | science | science | holism | holism | cultural object | cultural object | contemporary media | contemporary media | society | society | cultural assumptions | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | neuroscience | anthropology | anthropology | history | history | semiotics | semiotics | cognitive sciences | cognitive sciences | historical views | historical views | digital images | digital images | psychopharmacology | psychopharmacology | mental illness | mental illness | neurotransmitters | neurotransmitters | brain science | brain science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.98 Neuropharmacology (MIT) 9.98 Neuropharmacology (MIT)

Description

The neuropharmacology course will discuss the drug-induced changes in functioning of the nervous system. The specific focus of this course will be to provide a description of the cellular and molecular actions of drugs on synaptic transmission. This course will also refer to specific diseases of the nervous system and their treatment in addition to giving an overview of the techniques used for the study of neuropharmacology. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. The neuropharmacology course will discuss the drug-induced changes in functioning of the nervous system. The specific focus of this course will be to provide a description of the cellular and molecular actions of drugs on synaptic transmission. This course will also refer to specific diseases of the nervous system and their treatment in addition to giving an overview of the techniques used for the study of neuropharmacology. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

antidepressant | antidepressant | psychopharmacology | psychopharmacology | neurology | neurology | neuroscience | neuroscience | pharmacology | pharmacology | synapse | synapse | seratonin | seratonin | drug | drug | disposition | disposition | tolerance | tolerance | physical dependence model | physical dependence model | depot binding | depot binding | classic antipsychotic drugs | classic antipsychotic drugs | experimental substance use | experimental substance use | anabolic steroid dependence | anabolic steroid dependence | biobehavioral effects | biobehavioral effects | positive reinforcement model | positive reinforcement model | phenethylamine hallucinogens | phenethylamine hallucinogens | discriminative stimulus effects | discriminative stimulus effects | nicotine reinforcement | nicotine reinforcement | somatodendritic autoreceptors | somatodendritic autoreceptors | selected brain areas | selected brain areas | many psychoactive drugs | many psychoactive drugs | terminal autoreceptors | terminal autoreceptors | abstinence signs | abstinence signs | motor side effects | motor side effects | drug reinforcement | drug reinforcement | other psychostimulants | other psychostimulants | postsynaptic cell | postsynaptic cell | nicotine tolerance | nicotine tolerance | abstinent smokers | abstinent smokers | behavioral tolerance | behavioral tolerance | chronic drug use | chronic drug use | susceptibility models | susceptibility models

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Neurotransmitters (MIT) Neurotransmitters (MIT)

Description

Subject examines the brain as a cultural object in contemporary media, science, and society. Explores cultural assumptions about neuroscience by drawing on anthropology, history, semiotics, and the cognitive sciences. Topics include historical views of the brain; digital images of the brain; psychopharmacology; mental illness; neurotransmitters; and the culture of brain science. Class assignments include three brief analytical papers and one oral presentation. Subject examines the brain as a cultural object in contemporary media, science, and society. Explores cultural assumptions about neuroscience by drawing on anthropology, history, semiotics, and the cognitive sciences. Topics include historical views of the brain; digital images of the brain; psychopharmacology; mental illness; neurotransmitters; and the culture of brain science. Class assignments include three brief analytical papers and one oral presentation.

Subjects

brain | brain | cultural object | cultural object | contemporary media | contemporary media | science | science | society | society | cultural assumptions | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | neuroscience | anthropology | anthropology | history | history | semiotics | semiotics | cognitive sciences | cognitive sciences | historical views | historical views | digital images | digital images | psychopharmacology | psychopharmacology | mental illness | mental illness | neurotransmitters | neurotransmitters | brain science | brain science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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24.08J Philosophical Issues in Brain Science (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to important philosophical questions about the mind, specifically those that are intimately connected with contemporary psychology and neuroscience. Are our concepts innate or are they acquired by experience? And what does it even mean to call a concept 'innate'? Are 'mental images' pictures in the head? Is color in the mind or in the world? Is the mind nothing more than the brain? Can there be a science of consciousness? The course includes guest lectures by philosophers and cognitive scientists.

Subjects

brain | philosophy | science | holism | cultural object | contemporary media | society | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | anthropology | history | semiotics | cognitive sciences | historical views | digital images | psychopharmacology | mental illness | neurotransmitters | brain science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

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9.98 Neuropharmacology (MIT)

Description

The neuropharmacology course will discuss the drug-induced changes in functioning of the nervous system. The specific focus of this course will be to provide a description of the cellular and molecular actions of drugs on synaptic transmission. This course will also refer to specific diseases of the nervous system and their treatment in addition to giving an overview of the techniques used for the study of neuropharmacology. This course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

antidepressant | psychopharmacology | neurology | neuroscience | pharmacology | synapse | seratonin | drug | disposition | tolerance | physical dependence model | depot binding | classic antipsychotic drugs | experimental substance use | anabolic steroid dependence | biobehavioral effects | positive reinforcement model | phenethylamine hallucinogens | discriminative stimulus effects | nicotine reinforcement | somatodendritic autoreceptors | selected brain areas | many psychoactive drugs | terminal autoreceptors | abstinence signs | motor side effects | drug reinforcement | other psychostimulants | postsynaptic cell | nicotine tolerance | abstinent smokers | behavioral tolerance | chronic drug use | susceptibility models

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alllifesciencescourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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Neurotransmitters (MIT)

Description

Subject examines the brain as a cultural object in contemporary media, science, and society. Explores cultural assumptions about neuroscience by drawing on anthropology, history, semiotics, and the cognitive sciences. Topics include historical views of the brain; digital images of the brain; psychopharmacology; mental illness; neurotransmitters; and the culture of brain science. Class assignments include three brief analytical papers and one oral presentation.

Subjects

brain | cultural object | contemporary media | science | society | cultural assumptions | neuroscience | anthropology | history | semiotics | cognitive sciences | historical views | digital images | psychopharmacology | mental illness | neurotransmitters | brain science

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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