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11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT) 11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT)

Description

This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial? This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial?

Subjects

how society should respond to poverty | how society should respond to poverty | race | race | politics of welfare | politics of welfare | out-of-wedlock births | out-of-wedlock births | homelessness | homelessness | crime | crime | drugs | drugs | knowledge about poverty and community | knowledge about poverty and community | empowerment from social science research | empowerment from social science research | public discourse and politics | public discourse and politics | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | social controversy | social controversy | 1990s | 1990s | poverty | poverty | welfare | welfare | extra-marital births | extra-marital births | values | values | politics | politics | public policy | public policy | social science research | social science research | public discourse | public discourse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT)

Description

This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial?

Subjects

how society should respond to poverty | race | politics of welfare | out-of-wedlock births | homelessness | crime | drugs | knowledge about poverty and community | empowerment from social science research | public discourse and politics | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | social controversy | 1990s | poverty | welfare | extra-marital births | values | politics | public policy | social science research | public discourse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

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11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT)

Description

This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial?

Subjects

how society should respond to poverty | race | politics of welfare | out-of-wedlock births | homelessness | crime | drugs | knowledge about poverty and community | empowerment from social science research | public discourse and politics | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | social controversy | 1990s | poverty | welfare | extra-marital births | values | politics | public policy | social science research | public discourse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Show Trials | Great Terror | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Galileo | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Stalin | Bukharin | Scopes | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | public discussion | legal system | legal reasoning | storytelling | evidence | interpretation | law | society | social issues | public discourse | narrative | dissenters | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

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University Writing Program

Description

Notre Dame OpenCourseware (OCW) offers free online educational resources for courses in the University Writing Program. All first year students at Notre Dame are required to take a one semester First Year Composition course, which introduces them to principles of academic discourse and ethical argumentation. Additionally, the University of Notre Dame Writing Program's Writing Center aims to create a culture of writing on the Notre Dame campus by working with student writers in intensive, one-on-one tutoring sessions.

Subjects

FYC | rhetoric | first year | free | course | online | public discourse | ethical argumentation | composition | OCW

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Show Trials | Great Terror | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Galileo | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Stalin | Bukharin | Scopes | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | public discussion | legal system | legal reasoning | storytelling | evidence | interpretation | law | society | social issues | public discourse | narrative | dissenters | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Show Trials | Great Terror | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Galileo | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Stalin | Bukharin | Scopes | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | public discussion | legal system | legal reasoning | storytelling | evidence | interpretation | law | society | social issues | public discourse | narrative | dissenters | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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