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21A.500J Technology and Culture (MIT) 21A.500J Technology and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject examines relationships among technology, culture, and politics in a range of social and historical settings. The class is organized around two topics: Identity and infrastructure, and will combine interactive lectures, film screenings, readings, and discussion. This subject examines relationships among technology, culture, and politics in a range of social and historical settings. The class is organized around two topics: Identity and infrastructure, and will combine interactive lectures, film screenings, readings, and discussion.

Subjects

21A.500 | 21A.500 | STS.075 | STS.075 | technology | technology | technology and culture | technology and culture | biotechnology | biotechnology | computers and the self | computers and the self | digital world | digital world | science and religion | science and religion | racial economy | racial economy | ethics | ethics | technoscience | technoscience | bioterrorism | bioterrorism | cloning | cloning | genetically modified food | genetically modified food | GMO | GMO | gender identity | gender identity | information age | information age

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.240 Race and Science (MIT) 21A.240 Race and Science (MIT)

Description

This course examines one of the most enduring and influential forms of identity and experience in the Americas and Europe, and in particular the ways race and racism have been created, justified, or contested in scientific practice and discourse. Drawing on classical and contemporary readings from Du Bois to Gould to Gilroy, we ask whether the logic of race might be changing in the world of genomics and informatics, and with that changed logic, how we can respond today to new configurations of race, science, technology, and inequality. Considered are the rise of evolutionary racism; debates about eugenics in the early twentieth century; Nazi notions of "racial hygiene"; nation-building projects and race in Latin America; and the movement in modern biology from race to populations to gene This course examines one of the most enduring and influential forms of identity and experience in the Americas and Europe, and in particular the ways race and racism have been created, justified, or contested in scientific practice and discourse. Drawing on classical and contemporary readings from Du Bois to Gould to Gilroy, we ask whether the logic of race might be changing in the world of genomics and informatics, and with that changed logic, how we can respond today to new configurations of race, science, technology, and inequality. Considered are the rise of evolutionary racism; debates about eugenics in the early twentieth century; Nazi notions of "racial hygiene"; nation-building projects and race in Latin America; and the movement in modern biology from race to populations to gene

Subjects

race | race | eugenics | eugenics | scientific racism | scientific racism | racial hygiene | racial hygiene | racial economy | racial economy | human biodiversity | human biodiversity | apartheid | apartheid | race and gender | race and gender | monogenist | monogenist | polygenist | polygenist | alchemy of race | alchemy of race | nazi medicine | nazi medicine | nazi racism | nazi racism | sociology of science | sociology of science | race and culture | race and culture | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | raciology. | raciology.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

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21A.500J Technology and Culture (MIT)

Description

This subject examines relationships among technology, culture, and politics in a range of social and historical settings. The class is organized around two topics: Identity and infrastructure, and will combine interactive lectures, film screenings, readings, and discussion.

Subjects

21A.500 | STS.075 | technology | technology and culture | biotechnology | computers and the self | digital world | science and religion | racial economy | ethics | technoscience | bioterrorism | cloning | genetically modified food | GMO | gender identity | information age

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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21A.240 Race and Science (MIT)

Description

This course examines one of the most enduring and influential forms of identity and experience in the Americas and Europe, and in particular the ways race and racism have been created, justified, or contested in scientific practice and discourse. Drawing on classical and contemporary readings from Du Bois to Gould to Gilroy, we ask whether the logic of race might be changing in the world of genomics and informatics, and with that changed logic, how we can respond today to new configurations of race, science, technology, and inequality. Considered are the rise of evolutionary racism; debates about eugenics in the early twentieth century; Nazi notions of "racial hygiene"; nation-building projects and race in Latin America; and the movement in modern biology from race to populations to gene

Subjects

race | eugenics | scientific racism | racial hygiene | racial economy | human biodiversity | apartheid | race and gender | monogenist | polygenist | alchemy of race | nazi medicine | nazi racism | sociology of science | race and culture | genetic engineering | raciology.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21A.xml

Attribution

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