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22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT) 22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT)

Description

The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed. Examples from the current literature will be used to supplement lecture materi The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed. Examples from the current literature will be used to supplement lecture materi

Subjects

Interaction of radiation with biological material | Interaction of radiation with biological material | how different types of radiation deposit energy | how different types of radiation deposit energy | secondary radiations | secondary radiations | how radiation affects cells | how radiation affects cells | biological effects | biological effects | effects of radiation on biological systems | effects of radiation on biological systems | DNA damage | DNA damage | in vitro cell survival models | in vitro cell survival models | in vivo mammalian systems | in vivo mammalian systems | radiation therapy | radiation therapy | radiation syndromes in humans | radiation syndromes in humans | carcinogenesis | carcinogenesis | Environmental radiation sources | Environmental radiation sources | radiation protection | radiation protection | cells | cells | tissues | tissues | radiation interactions | radiation interactions | radiation chemistry | radiation chemistry | LET | LET | tracks | tracks | chromosome damags | chromosome damags | in vivo | in vivo | in vitro | in vitro | cell survival curves | cell survival curves | dose response | dose response | RBE | RBE | clustered damage | clustered damage | radiation response | radiation response | tumor kinetics | tumor kinetics | tumor radiobiology | tumor radiobiology | fractionation | fractionation | protons | protons | alpha particles | alpha particles | whole body exposure | whole body exposure | chronic exposure | chronic exposure | space | space | microbeams | microbeams | radon | radon | background radiation | background radiation | 22.55 | 22.55 | HST.560 | HST.560

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22.01 Introduction to Ionizing Radiation (MIT) 22.01 Introduction to Ionizing Radiation (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to basic properties of ionizing radiations and their uses in medicine, industry, science, and environmental studies. Discusses natural and man-made radiation sources, energy deposition and dose calculations, various physical, chemical, and biological processes and effects of radiation with examples of their uses, and principles of radiation protection. Term paper and oral presentation of paper required.This course was originally developed by Dr. Jacquelyn Yanch.  As such, significant portions of the materials presented here were derived from her work. This course is an introduction to basic properties of ionizing radiations and their uses in medicine, industry, science, and environmental studies. Discusses natural and man-made radiation sources, energy deposition and dose calculations, various physical, chemical, and biological processes and effects of radiation with examples of their uses, and principles of radiation protection. Term paper and oral presentation of paper required.This course was originally developed by Dr. Jacquelyn Yanch.  As such, significant portions of the materials presented here were derived from her work.

Subjects

ionizing radiations | ionizing radiations | radiation sources | radiation sources | energy deposition | energy deposition | dose calculations | dose calculations | principles of radiation protection | principles of radiation protection | ionizing | ionizing | radiation | radiation | medicine | medicine | industry | industry | science | science | environmental studies | environmental studies | natural radiation sources | natural radiation sources | man-made radiation | man-made radiation | radiation protection | radiation protection | material interaction | material interaction | biological material | biological material | radiation therapy | radiation therapy | medical imaging | medical imaging | non-destructive evaluation | non-destructive evaluation | food irradiation | food irradiation | radionuclide dating | radionuclide dating | well-logging | well-logging

License

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22.14 Materials in Nuclear Engineering (MIT) 22.14 Materials in Nuclear Engineering (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will lay the foundation for understanding how materials behave in nuclear systems. In particular, we will build on a solid base of nuclear material fundamentals in order to understand radiation damage and effects in fuels and structural materials. This course consists of a series of directed readings, lectures on video, problem sets, short research projects, and class discussions with worked examples. We will start with an overview of nuclear materials, where they are found in nuclear systems, and how they fail. We will then develop the formalism in crystallography as a common language for materials scientists everywhere. This will be followed by the development of phase diagrams from thermodynamics, which predict how binary alloy systems evolve towards equilibrium. Then In this course, we will lay the foundation for understanding how materials behave in nuclear systems. In particular, we will build on a solid base of nuclear material fundamentals in order to understand radiation damage and effects in fuels and structural materials. This course consists of a series of directed readings, lectures on video, problem sets, short research projects, and class discussions with worked examples. We will start with an overview of nuclear materials, where they are found in nuclear systems, and how they fail. We will then develop the formalism in crystallography as a common language for materials scientists everywhere. This will be followed by the development of phase diagrams from thermodynamics, which predict how binary alloy systems evolve towards equilibrium. Then

Subjects

radiation materials science | radiation materials science | radiation damage to materials | radiation damage to materials | radiation induced segregation | radiation induced segregation | void swelling | void swelling | radiation induced hardening | radiation induced hardening | radiation induced embrittlement | radiation induced embrittlement | nuclear power plant | nuclear power plant | phase diagram | phase diagram | defects | defects | deformation | deformation | radiation effects | radiation effects | irradiation | irradiation

License

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22.01 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering and Ionizing Radiation (MIT) 22.01 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering and Ionizing Radiation (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to nuclear science and its engineering applications. It describes basic nuclear models, radioactivity, nuclear reactions and kinematics; covers the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, with an emphasis on radiation detection, radiation shielding, and radiation effects on human health; and presents energy systems based on fission and fusion nuclear reactions, as well as industrial and medical applications of nuclear science. This course provides an introduction to nuclear science and its engineering applications. It describes basic nuclear models, radioactivity, nuclear reactions and kinematics; covers the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, with an emphasis on radiation detection, radiation shielding, and radiation effects on human health; and presents energy systems based on fission and fusion nuclear reactions, as well as industrial and medical applications of nuclear science.

Subjects

ionizing radiation | ionizing radiation | natural radiation | natural radiation | half-life | half-life | radioactive decay | radioactive decay | dose calculation | dose calculation | radiation protection | radiation protection | radiation shielding | radiation shielding | hormesis | hormesis | nuclear power | nuclear power | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | biological effects of radiation | biological effects of radiation | food irradiation | food irradiation | radiation risk | radiation risk | radioactive dating | radioactive dating

License

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22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT)

Description

The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed. Examples from the current literature will be used to supplement lecture materi

Subjects

Interaction of radiation with biological material | how different types of radiation deposit energy | secondary radiations | how radiation affects cells | biological effects | effects of radiation on biological systems | DNA damage | in vitro cell survival models | in vivo mammalian systems | radiation therapy | radiation syndromes in humans | carcinogenesis | Environmental radiation sources | radiation protection | cells | tissues | radiation interactions | radiation chemistry | LET | tracks | chromosome damags | in vivo | in vitro | cell survival curves | dose response | RBE | clustered damage | radiation response | tumor kinetics | tumor radiobiology | fractionation | protons | alpha particles | whole body exposure | chronic exposure | space | microbeams | radon | background radiation | 22.55 | HST.560

License

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22.55J Principles of Radiation Interactions (MIT)

Description

The central theme of this course is the interaction of radiation with biological material. The course is intended to provide a broad understanding of how different types of radiation deposit energy, including the creation and behavior of secondary radiations; of how radiation affects cells and why the different types of radiation have very different biological effects. Topics will include: the effects of radiation on biological systems including DNA damage; in vitro cell survival models; and in vivo mammalian systems. The course covers radiation therapy, radiation syndromes in humans and carcinogenesis. Environmental radiation sources on earth and in space, and aspects of radiation protection are also discussed. Examples from the current literature will be used to supplement lecture materi

Subjects

Interaction of radiation with biological material | how different types of radiation deposit energy | secondary radiations | how radiation affects cells | biological effects | effects of radiation on biological systems | DNA damage | in vitro cell survival models | in vivo mammalian systems | radiation therapy | radiation syndromes in humans | carcinogenesis | Environmental radiation sources | radiation protection | cells | tissues | radiation interactions | radiation chemistry | LET | tracks | chromosome damags | in vivo | in vitro | cell survival curves | dose response | RBE | clustered damage | radiation response | tumor kinetics | tumor radiobiology | fractionation | protons | alpha particles | whole body exposure | chronic exposure | space | microbeams | radon | background radiation | 22.55 | HST.560

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.01 Introduction to Ionizing Radiation (MIT) 22.01 Introduction to Ionizing Radiation (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the basic properties of ionizing radiations and their uses in medicine, industry, science, and environmental studies. We will discuss natural and man-made radiation sources, energy deposition and dose calculations, and various physical, chemical, and biological processes and effects of radiation, with examples of their uses, and principles of radiation protection. This course provides an introduction to the basic properties of ionizing radiations and their uses in medicine, industry, science, and environmental studies. We will discuss natural and man-made radiation sources, energy deposition and dose calculations, and various physical, chemical, and biological processes and effects of radiation, with examples of their uses, and principles of radiation protection.

Subjects

ionizing radiation | ionizing radiation | natural radiation | natural radiation | man-made radiation | man-made radiation | energy deposition | energy deposition | dose calculations | dose calculations | radiation protection | radiation protection | radiation damage | radiation damage | DNA | DNA | cell survival curves | cell survival curves | radioactive decay | radioactive decay | beta decay | beta decay | gamma decay | gamma decay | radiological dating | radiological dating | radiation interactions | radiation interactions | radon | radon | medical imaging | medical imaging

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.01 Introduction to Ionizing Radiation (MIT) 22.01 Introduction to Ionizing Radiation (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the basic properties of ionizing radiations and their uses in medicine, industry, science, and environmental studies. We will discuss natural and man-made radiation sources, energy deposition and dose calculations, and various physical, chemical, and biological processes and effects of radiation, with examples of their uses, and principles of radiation protection. This course provides an introduction to the basic properties of ionizing radiations and their uses in medicine, industry, science, and environmental studies. We will discuss natural and man-made radiation sources, energy deposition and dose calculations, and various physical, chemical, and biological processes and effects of radiation, with examples of their uses, and principles of radiation protection.

Subjects

ionizing radiation | ionizing radiation | natural radiation | natural radiation | man-made radiation | man-made radiation | energy deposition | energy deposition | dose calculations | dose calculations | radiation protection | radiation protection | radiation damage | radiation damage | DNA | DNA | cell survival curves | cell survival curves | radioactive decay | radioactive decay | beta decay | beta decay | gamma decay | gamma decay | radiological dating | radiological dating | radiation interactions | radiation interactions | radon | radon | medical imaging | medical imaging

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.01 Introduction to Ionizing Radiation (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to basic properties of ionizing radiations and their uses in medicine, industry, science, and environmental studies. Discusses natural and man-made radiation sources, energy deposition and dose calculations, various physical, chemical, and biological processes and effects of radiation with examples of their uses, and principles of radiation protection. Term paper and oral presentation of paper required.This course was originally developed by Dr. Jacquelyn Yanch.  As such, significant portions of the materials presented here were derived from her work.

Subjects

ionizing radiations | radiation sources | energy deposition | dose calculations | principles of radiation protection | ionizing | radiation | medicine | industry | science | environmental studies | natural radiation sources | man-made radiation | radiation protection | material interaction | biological material | radiation therapy | medical imaging | non-destructive evaluation | food irradiation | radionuclide dating | well-logging

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.322 Quantum Theory II (MIT) 8.322 Quantum Theory II (MIT)

Description

8.322 is the second semester of a two-semester subject on quantum theory, stressing principles. Topics covered include: time-dependent perturbation theory and applications to radiation, quantization of EM radiation field, adiabatic theorem and Berry's phase, symmetries in QM, many-particle systems, scattering theory, relativistic quantum mechanics, and Dirac equation. 8.322 is the second semester of a two-semester subject on quantum theory, stressing principles. Topics covered include: time-dependent perturbation theory and applications to radiation, quantization of EM radiation field, adiabatic theorem and Berry's phase, symmetries in QM, many-particle systems, scattering theory, relativistic quantum mechanics, and Dirac equation.

Subjects

uncertainty relation | uncertainty relation | observables | observables | eigenstates | eigenstates | eigenvalues | eigenvalues | probabilities of the results of measurement | probabilities of the results of measurement | transformation theory | transformation theory | equations of motion | equations of motion | constants of motion | constants of motion | Symmetry in quantum mechanics | Symmetry in quantum mechanics | representations of symmetry groups | representations of symmetry groups | Variational and perturbation approximations | Variational and perturbation approximations | Systems of identical particles and applications | Systems of identical particles and applications | Time-dependent perturbation theory | Time-dependent perturbation theory | Scattering theory: phase shifts | Scattering theory: phase shifts | Born approximation | Born approximation | The quantum theory of radiation | The quantum theory of radiation | Second quantization and many-body theory | Second quantization and many-body theory | Relativistic quantum mechanics of one electron | Relativistic quantum mechanics of one electron | probability | probability | measurement | measurement | motion equations | motion equations | motion constants | motion constants | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | variational approximations | variational approximations | perturbation approximations | perturbation approximations | identical particles | identical particles | time-dependent perturbation theory | time-dependent perturbation theory | scattering theory | scattering theory | phase shifts | phase shifts | quantum theory of radiation | quantum theory of radiation | second quantization | second quantization | many-body theory | many-body theory | relativistic quantum mechanics | relativistic quantum mechanics | one electron | one electron | quantization | quantization | EM radiation field | EM radiation field | electromagnetic radiation field | electromagnetic radiation field | adiabatic theorem | adiabatic theorem | Berry?s phase | Berry?s phase | many-particle systems | many-particle systems | Dirac equation | Dirac equation | Hilbert spaces | Hilbert spaces | time evolution | time evolution | Schrodinger picture | Schrodinger picture | Heisenberg picture | Heisenberg picture | interaction picture | interaction picture | classical mechanics | classical mechanics | path integrals | path integrals | EM fields | EM fields | electromagnetic fields | electromagnetic fields | angular momentum | angular momentum | density operators | density operators | quantum measurement | quantum measurement | quantum statistics | quantum statistics | quantum dynamics | quantum dynamics

License

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2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (MIT) 2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (MIT)

Description

2.51 is a 12-unit subject, serving as the Mechanical Engineering Department's advanced undergraduate course in heat and mass transfer. The prerequisites for this course are the undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, specifically Thermal Fluids Engineering I and Thermal Fluids Engineering II or their equivalents. This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in those courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations. Course 2.51 is directed at undergraduates having a strong interest in thermal science and graduate students who have not previously studied heat transfer. 2.51 is a 12-unit subject, serving as the Mechanical Engineering Department's advanced undergraduate course in heat and mass transfer. The prerequisites for this course are the undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, specifically Thermal Fluids Engineering I and Thermal Fluids Engineering II or their equivalents. This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in those courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations. Course 2.51 is directed at undergraduates having a strong interest in thermal science and graduate students who have not previously studied heat transfer.

Subjects

heat transfer | heat transfer | mass transfer | mass transfer | Unsteady heat conduction | Unsteady heat conduction | evaporation | evaporation | solar radiation | solar radiation | spectral radiation | spectral radiation | grey radiation networks | grey radiation networks | black bodies | black bodies | thermal radiation | thermal radiation | external configurations | external configurations | natural convection | natural convection | forced convection | forced convection | steady conduction in multidimensional configurations | steady conduction in multidimensional configurations

License

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2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (MIT) 2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (MIT)

Description

2.51 is a 12-unit subject, serving as the Mechanical Engineering Department's advanced undergraduate course in heat and mass transfer. The prerequisites for this course are the undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, specifically Thermal Fluids Engineering I and Thermal Fluids Engineering II or their equivalents. This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in those courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations. Course 2.51 is directed at undergraduates having a strong interest in thermal science and graduate students who have not previously studied heat transfer. 2.51 is a 12-unit subject, serving as the Mechanical Engineering Department's advanced undergraduate course in heat and mass transfer. The prerequisites for this course are the undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, specifically Thermal Fluids Engineering I and Thermal Fluids Engineering II or their equivalents. This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in those courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations. Course 2.51 is directed at undergraduates having a strong interest in thermal science and graduate students who have not previously studied heat transfer.

Subjects

heat transfer | heat transfer | mass transfer | mass transfer | Unsteady heat conduction | Unsteady heat conduction | evaporation | evaporation | solar radiation | solar radiation | spectral radiation | spectral radiation | grey radiation networks | grey radiation networks | black bodies | black bodies | thermal radiation | thermal radiation | external configurations | external configurations | natural convection | natural convection | forced convection | forced convection | steady conduction in multidimensional configurations | steady conduction in multidimensional configurations

License

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22.01 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering and Ionizing Radiation (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to nuclear science and its engineering applications. It describes basic nuclear models, radioactivity, nuclear reactions and kinematics; covers the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, with an emphasis on radiation detection, radiation shielding, and radiation effects on human health; and presents energy systems based on fission and fusion nuclear reactions, as well as industrial and medical applications of nuclear science.

Subjects

ionizing radiation | natural radiation | half-life | radioactive decay | dose calculation | radiation protection | radiation shielding | hormesis | nuclear power | nuclear energy | biological effects of radiation | food irradiation | radiation risk | radioactive dating

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.14 Materials in Nuclear Engineering (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will lay the foundation for understanding how materials behave in nuclear systems. In particular, we will build on a solid base of nuclear material fundamentals in order to understand radiation damage and effects in fuels and structural materials. This course consists of a series of directed readings, lectures on video, problem sets, short research projects, and class discussions with worked examples. We will start with an overview of nuclear materials, where they are found in nuclear systems, and how they fail. We will then develop the formalism in crystallography as a common language for materials scientists everywhere. This will be followed by the development of phase diagrams from thermodynamics, which predict how binary alloy systems evolve towards equilibrium. Then

Subjects

radiation materials science | radiation damage to materials | radiation induced segregation | void swelling | radiation induced hardening | radiation induced embrittlement | nuclear power plant | phase diagram | defects | deformation | radiation effects | irradiation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.01 Introduction to Ionizing Radiation (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the basic properties of ionizing radiations and their uses in medicine, industry, science, and environmental studies. We will discuss natural and man-made radiation sources, energy deposition and dose calculations, and various physical, chemical, and biological processes and effects of radiation, with examples of their uses, and principles of radiation protection.

Subjects

ionizing radiation | natural radiation | man-made radiation | energy deposition | dose calculations | radiation protection | radiation damage | DNA | cell survival curves | radioactive decay | beta decay | gamma decay | radiological dating | radiation interactions | radon | medical imaging

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.105 Electromagnetic Interactions (MIT) 22.105 Electromagnetic Interactions (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate level subject on electromagnetic theory with particular emphasis on basics and applications to Nuclear Science and Engineering. The basic topics covered include electrostatics, magnetostatics, and electromagnetic radiation. The applications include transmission lines, waveguides, antennas, scattering, shielding, charged particle collisions, Bremsstrahlung radiation, and Cerenkov radiation. Acknowledgments Professor Freidberg would like to acknowledge the immense contributions made to this course by its previous instructors, Ian Hutchinson and Ron Parker. This course is a graduate level subject on electromagnetic theory with particular emphasis on basics and applications to Nuclear Science and Engineering. The basic topics covered include electrostatics, magnetostatics, and electromagnetic radiation. The applications include transmission lines, waveguides, antennas, scattering, shielding, charged particle collisions, Bremsstrahlung radiation, and Cerenkov radiation. Acknowledgments Professor Freidberg would like to acknowledge the immense contributions made to this course by its previous instructors, Ian Hutchinson and Ron Parker.

Subjects

electrostatics | electrostatics | coulomb's law | coulomb's law | gauss's law | gauss's law | potentials | potentials | laplace equations | laplace equations | poisson equations | poisson equations | capacitors | capacitors | resistors | resistors | child-langmuir law | child-langmuir law | magnetostatics | magnetostatics | ampere's law | ampere's law | biot-savart law | biot-savart law | magnets | magnets | inductors | inductors | superconducting magnets | superconducting magnets | single particle motion | single particle motion | lorentz force | lorentz force | quasi-statics | quasi-statics | faraday's law | faraday's law | maxwell equations | maxwell equations | plane waves | plane waves | reflection | reflection | refraction | refraction | klystrons | klystrons | gyrotrons | gyrotrons | lienard-wiechert potentials | lienard-wiechert potentials | thomson scattering | thomson scattering | compton scattering | compton scattering | synchrotron radiation | synchrotron radiation | bremsstrahlung radiation | bremsstrahlung radiation | cerenkov radiation | cerenkov radiation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.105 Electromagnetic Interactions (MIT) 22.105 Electromagnetic Interactions (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate level subject on electromagnetic theory with particular emphasis on basics and applications to Nuclear Science and Engineering. The basic topics covered include electrostatics, magnetostatics, and electromagnetic radiation. The applications include transmission lines, waveguides, antennas, scattering, shielding, charged particle collisions, Bremsstrahlung radiation, and Cerenkov radiation. Acknowledgments Professor Freidberg would like to acknowledge the immense contributions made to this course by its previous instructors, Ian Hutchinson and Ron Parker. This course is a graduate level subject on electromagnetic theory with particular emphasis on basics and applications to Nuclear Science and Engineering. The basic topics covered include electrostatics, magnetostatics, and electromagnetic radiation. The applications include transmission lines, waveguides, antennas, scattering, shielding, charged particle collisions, Bremsstrahlung radiation, and Cerenkov radiation. Acknowledgments Professor Freidberg would like to acknowledge the immense contributions made to this course by its previous instructors, Ian Hutchinson and Ron Parker.

Subjects

electrostatics | electrostatics | coulomb's law | coulomb's law | gauss's law | gauss's law | potentials | potentials | laplace equations | laplace equations | poisson equations | poisson equations | capacitors | capacitors | resistors | resistors | child-langmuir law | child-langmuir law | magnetostatics | magnetostatics | ampere's law | ampere's law | biot-savart law | biot-savart law | magnets | magnets | inductors | inductors | superconducting magnets | superconducting magnets | single particle motion | single particle motion | lorentz force | lorentz force | quasi-statics | quasi-statics | faraday's law | faraday's law | maxwell equations | maxwell equations | plane waves | plane waves | reflection | reflection | refraction | refraction | klystrons | klystrons | gyrotrons | gyrotrons | lienard-wiechert potentials | lienard-wiechert potentials | thomson scattering | thomson scattering | compton scattering | compton scattering | synchrotron radiation | synchrotron radiation | bremsstrahlung radiation | bremsstrahlung radiation | cerenkov radiation | cerenkov radiation

License

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8.07 Electromagnetism II (MIT) 8.07 Electromagnetism II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second in a series on Electromagnetism beginning with Electromagnetism I (8.02 or 8.022). It is a survey of basic electromagnetic phenomena: electrostatics; magnetostatics; electromagnetic properties of matter; time-dependent electromagnetic fields; Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic waves; emission, absorption, and scattering of radiation; and relativistic electrodynamics and mechanics.   This course is the second in a series on Electromagnetism beginning with Electromagnetism I (8.02 or 8.022). It is a survey of basic electromagnetic phenomena: electrostatics; magnetostatics; electromagnetic properties of matter; time-dependent electromagnetic fields; Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic waves; emission, absorption, and scattering of radiation; and relativistic electrodynamics and mechanics.  

Subjects

electromagnetic phenomena | electromagnetic phenomena | electrostatics | electrostatics | magnetostatics | magnetostatics | electromagnetic fields | electromagnetic fields | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves | emission of radiation | emission of radiation | absorption of radiation | absorption of radiation | scattering of radiation | scattering of radiation | relativistic electrodynamics | relativistic electrodynamics

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12.091 Radon Research in Multidisciplines: A Review (MIT) 12.091 Radon Research in Multidisciplines: A Review (MIT)

Description

This course introduces fundamentals of radon physics, geology, radiation biology; provides hands on experience of measurement of radon in MIT environments, and discusses current radon research in the fields of geology, environment, building and construction, medicine and health physics. The course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This course introduces fundamentals of radon physics, geology, radiation biology; provides hands on experience of measurement of radon in MIT environments, and discusses current radon research in the fields of geology, environment, building and construction, medicine and health physics. The course is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

fieldwork | fieldwork | laboratory science | laboratory science | radon | radon | radiation physics | radiation physics | ions | ions | ionizing radiation | ionizing radiation | radon decay | radon decay | radon geology | radon geology | environmental research | environmental research | medicine | medicine | medical research | medical research | radiation health physics | radiation health physics | planetary sciences | planetary sciences | radon research | radon research

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2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (MIT)

Description

2.51 is a 12-unit subject, serving as the Mechanical Engineering Department's advanced undergraduate course in heat and mass transfer. The prerequisites for this course are the undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, specifically Thermal Fluids Engineering I and Thermal Fluids Engineering II or their equivalents. This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in those courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations. Course 2.51 is directed at undergraduates having a strong interest in thermal science and graduate students who have not previously studied heat transfer.

Subjects

heat transfer | mass transfer | Unsteady heat conduction | evaporation | solar radiation | spectral radiation | grey radiation networks | black bodies | thermal radiation | external configurations | natural convection | forced convection | steady conduction in multidimensional configurations

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2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer (MIT)

Description

2.51 is a 12-unit subject, serving as the Mechanical Engineering Department's advanced undergraduate course in heat and mass transfer. The prerequisites for this course are the undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, specifically Thermal Fluids Engineering I and Thermal Fluids Engineering II or their equivalents. This course covers problems of heat and mass transfer in greater depth and complexity than is done in those courses and incorporates many subjects that are not included or are treated lightly in those courses; analysis is given greater emphasis than the use of correlations. Course 2.51 is directed at undergraduates having a strong interest in thermal science and graduate students who have not previously studied heat transfer.

Subjects

heat transfer | mass transfer | Unsteady heat conduction | evaporation | solar radiation | spectral radiation | grey radiation networks | black bodies | thermal radiation | external configurations | natural convection | forced convection | steady conduction in multidimensional configurations

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22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT) 22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics (MIT)

Description

The topics covered under this course include elements of nuclear physics for engineering students, basic properties of the nucleus and nuclear radiations, quantum mechanical calculations of deuteron bound-state wave function and energy, n-p scattering cross-section, transition probability per unit time and barrier transmission probability. Also explored are binding energy and nuclear stability, interactions of charged particles, neutrons, and gamma rays with matter, radioactive decays, energetics and general cross-section behavior in nuclear reactions. The topics covered under this course include elements of nuclear physics for engineering students, basic properties of the nucleus and nuclear radiations, quantum mechanical calculations of deuteron bound-state wave function and energy, n-p scattering cross-section, transition probability per unit time and barrier transmission probability. Also explored are binding energy and nuclear stability, interactions of charged particles, neutrons, and gamma rays with matter, radioactive decays, energetics and general cross-section behavior in nuclear reactions.

Subjects

Nuclear physics | Nuclear physics | Nuclear reaction | Nuclear reaction | Nucleus | Nucleus | Nuclear radiation | Nuclear radiation | Quantum mechanics | Quantum mechanics | Deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | Deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | n-p scattering cross-section | n-p scattering cross-section | Transition probability per unit time | Transition probability per unit time | Barrier transmission probability | Barrier transmission probability | Binding energy | Binding energy | Nuclear stability | Nuclear stability | Interactions of charged particles neutrons and gamma rays with matter | Interactions of charged particles neutrons and gamma rays with matter | Radioactive decay | Radioactive decay | Energetics | Energetics | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | nuclear reaction | nuclear reaction | nucleus | nucleus | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | deuteron bound-state wave function and energy | transition probability per unit time | transition probability per unit time | barrier transmission probability | barrier transmission probability | nuclear stability | nuclear stability | Interactions of charged particles | Interactions of charged particles | neutrons | neutrons | and gamma rays with matter | and gamma rays with matter | energetics | energetics

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8.044 Statistical Physics I (MIT) 8.044 Statistical Physics I (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to probability, statistical mechanics, and thermodynamics. Numerous examples are used to illustrate a wide variety of physical phenomena such as magnetism, polyatomic gases, thermal radiation, electrons in solids, and noise in electronic devices. This course offers an introduction to probability, statistical mechanics, and thermodynamics. Numerous examples are used to illustrate a wide variety of physical phenomena such as magnetism, polyatomic gases, thermal radiation, electrons in solids, and noise in electronic devices.

Subjects

probability | probability | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | random variables | random variables | joint and conditional probability densities | joint and conditional probability densities | functions of a random variable | functions of a random variable | macroscopic variables | macroscopic variables | thermodynamic equilibrium | thermodynamic equilibrium | fundamental assumption of statistical mechanics | fundamental assumption of statistical mechanics | microcanonical and canonical ensembles | microcanonical and canonical ensembles | First | First | second | second | and third laws of thermodynamics | and third laws of thermodynamics | magnetism | magnetism | polyatomic gases | polyatomic gases | hermal radiation | hermal radiation | thermal radiation | thermal radiation | electrons in solids | electrons in solids | and noise in electronic devices | and noise in electronic devices | First | second | and third laws of thermodynamics | First | second | and third laws of thermodynamics

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8.044 Statistical Physics I (MIT) 8.044 Statistical Physics I (MIT)

Description

Introduction to probability, statistical mechanics, and thermodynamics. Random variables, joint and conditional probability densities, and functions of a random variable. Concepts of macroscopic variables and thermodynamic equilibrium, fundamental assumption of statistical mechanics, microcanonical and canonical ensembles. First, second, and third laws of thermodynamics. Numerous examples illustrating a wide variety of physical phenomena such as magnetism, polyatomic gases, thermal radiation, electrons in solids, and noise in electronic devices. Concurrent enrollment in 8.04, Quantum Physics I, is recommended. Introduction to probability, statistical mechanics, and thermodynamics. Random variables, joint and conditional probability densities, and functions of a random variable. Concepts of macroscopic variables and thermodynamic equilibrium, fundamental assumption of statistical mechanics, microcanonical and canonical ensembles. First, second, and third laws of thermodynamics. Numerous examples illustrating a wide variety of physical phenomena such as magnetism, polyatomic gases, thermal radiation, electrons in solids, and noise in electronic devices. Concurrent enrollment in 8.04, Quantum Physics I, is recommended.

Subjects

probability | probability | statistical mechanics | statistical mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | random variables | random variables | joint and conditional probability densities | joint and conditional probability densities | functions of a random variable | functions of a random variable | macroscopic variables | macroscopic variables | thermodynamic equilibrium | thermodynamic equilibrium | fundamental assumption of statistical mechanics | fundamental assumption of statistical mechanics | microcanonical and canonical ensembles | microcanonical and canonical ensembles | First | First | second | second | and third laws of thermodynamics | and third laws of thermodynamics | magnetism | magnetism | polyatomic gases | polyatomic gases | hermal radiation | hermal radiation | thermal radiation | thermal radiation | electrons in solids | electrons in solids | and noise in electronic devices | and noise in electronic devices | First | second | and third laws of thermodynamics | First | second | and third laws of thermodynamics

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT) 8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models. Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | solar system | stars | stars | interstellar medium | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Galaxy | the Universe | the Universe | planets | planets | planet formation | planet formation | star formation | star formation | stellar evolution | stellar evolution | supernovae | supernovae | compact objects | compact objects | white dwarfs | white dwarfs | neutron stars | neutron stars | black holes | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | star clusters | globular and open clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | binary X-ray sources | gas | gas | dust | dust | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | cosmic rays | galaxy | galaxy | universe | universe | astrophysics | astrophysics | Sun | Sun | supernova | supernova | globular clusters | globular clusters | open clusters | open clusters | jets | jets | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | dynamical expansion | thermal history | thermal history | normal galaxies | normal galaxies | active galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | Greek astronomy | physics | physics | Copernicus | Copernicus | Tycho | Tycho | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | classical mechanics | classical mechanics | circular orbits | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | electromagnetic radiation | matter | matter | telescopes | telescopes | detectors | detectors | 8.282 | 8.282 | 12.402 | 12.402 | plusars | plusars | galaxies | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | normal and active galaxies | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe

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