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9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT) 9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT)

Description

Relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include: functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory. In order to improve writing skills in describing experiments and reviewing journal publications in neuroscience, students are required to complete four homework assignments and one literature review with revision. Technical RequirementsMedia player software, such as Quicktime Player, RealOne Player, or Windows Media Player, is required to run the .mp3 files found on this cou Relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include: functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory. In order to improve writing skills in describing experiments and reviewing journal publications in neuroscience, students are required to complete four homework assignments and one literature review with revision. Technical RequirementsMedia player software, such as Quicktime Player, RealOne Player, or Windows Media Player, is required to run the .mp3 files found on this cou

Subjects

functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sleep | dreaming | motivation | reward | emotional displays | higher functions" | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sleep | dreaming | motivation | reward | emotional displays | higher functions" | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | functional neuroanatomy | functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sensory systems | sleep | sleep | dreaming | dreaming | motivation | motivation | reward | reward | emotional displays | emotional displays | higher functions | higher functions | neocortex | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | neural processes in learning and memory | Neurobehavior | Neurobehavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 The Radical Consequences of Respiration: Reactive Oxygen Species in Aging and Disease (MIT) 7.343 The Radical Consequences of Respiration: Reactive Oxygen Species in Aging and Disease (MIT)

Description

This course will start with a survey of basic oxygen radical biochemistry followed by a discussion of the mechanisms of action of cellular as well as dietary antioxidants. After considering the normal physiological roles of oxidants, we will examine the effects of elevated ROS and a failure of cellular redox capacity on the rate of organismal and cellular aging as well as on the onset and progression of several major diseases that are often age-related. Topics will include ROS-induced effects on stem cell regeneration, insulin resistance, heart disease, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. The role of antioxidants in potential therapeutic strategies for modulating ROS levels will also be discussed. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology D This course will start with a survey of basic oxygen radical biochemistry followed by a discussion of the mechanisms of action of cellular as well as dietary antioxidants. After considering the normal physiological roles of oxidants, we will examine the effects of elevated ROS and a failure of cellular redox capacity on the rate of organismal and cellular aging as well as on the onset and progression of several major diseases that are often age-related. Topics will include ROS-induced effects on stem cell regeneration, insulin resistance, heart disease, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. The role of antioxidants in potential therapeutic strategies for modulating ROS levels will also be discussed. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology D

Subjects

reactive oxygen species | reactive oxygen species | oxygen | oxygen | ROS | ROS | energy | energy | mitochondria | mitochondria | cell signaling | cell signaling | anti-pathogen | anti-pathogen | oxidative damage | oxidative damage | oncogene | oncogene | antioxidant | antioxidant | insulin resistance | insulin resistance | diabetes | diabetes | stem cell | stem cell | neurodegenerative | neurodegenerative | ischemic | ischemic | ATP | ATP | pathways | pathways | NADPH | NADPH | nox | nox | psd | psd | programmed cell death | programmed cell death | apoptosis | apoptosis | hsc | hsc | hematopoietic | hematopoietic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT) 7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe

Subjects

ubiquitination | ubiquitination | ubiquitin | ubiquitin | proteasome | proteasome | post-translational mechanisms | post-translational mechanisms | ubiquitin-conjugation system | ubiquitin-conjugation system | neurodegenerative diseases | neurodegenerative diseases | immune response | immune response | cell cycle regulation | cell cycle regulation | apoptosis | apoptosis | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | protein degradation | protein degradation | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | ligases | ligases | translocated proteins | translocated proteins | misfolded proteins | misfolded proteins | trafficking membranes | trafficking membranes | cell cycle control | cell cycle control | programmed cell death | programmed cell death | Huntington's Disease | Huntington's Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT) 9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers the relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers the relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory.

Subjects

functional neuroanatomy | functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sensory systems | sleep | sleep | dreaming | dreaming | motivation | motivation | reward | reward | emotional displays | emotional displays | higher functions | higher functions | neocortex | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | neural processes in learning and memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.16 Experimental Molecular Biology: Biotechnology II (MIT) 7.16 Experimental Molecular Biology: Biotechnology II (MIT)

Description

The course applies molecular biology and reverse genetics approaches to the study of apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), in Drosophila cells. RNA interference (RNAi), or double stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing, will be used to inhibit expression of candidate apoptosis-related genes in cultured Drosophila cells. Teams of 2 or 3 students will design and carry out experiments to address questions about the genes involved in the regulation and execution of PCD in this system. Some projects involve the use of DNA damaging agents or other cytotoxic chemicals or drugs to help understand the pathways that control a cell's decision to undergo apoptosis. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are provided. The course applies molecular biology and reverse genetics approaches to the study of apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), in Drosophila cells. RNA interference (RNAi), or double stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing, will be used to inhibit expression of candidate apoptosis-related genes in cultured Drosophila cells. Teams of 2 or 3 students will design and carry out experiments to address questions about the genes involved in the regulation and execution of PCD in this system. Some projects involve the use of DNA damaging agents or other cytotoxic chemicals or drugs to help understand the pathways that control a cell's decision to undergo apoptosis. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are provided.

Subjects

RNAi | RNAi | RNA interference | RNA interference | programmed cell death | programmed cell death | Drosophilia | Drosophilia | PCD | PCD | mRNA | mRNA | lab notebook | lab notebook | scientific writing | scientific writing | RT-PCR | RT-PCR | S2 RNA | S2 RNA | S2 | S2 | cell culture | cell culture | genetic transcription | genetic transcription | dsRNA | dsRNA | bioinformatics | bioinformatics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Sistemas Operativos I Sistemas Operativos I

Description

La asignatura de Sistemas Operativos I se imparte en el segundo cuatrimestre del segundo curso y tiene asignados 6 créditos troncales (3 teóricos + 3 prácticos). Los descriptores según BOE de esta asignatura son los siguientes: Organización, Estructura y Servicio de los Sistemas Operativos. Gestión y administración de memoria y de procesos. Gestión de entrada/salida. Sistema de ficheros. La asignatura de Sistemas Operativos I se imparte en el segundo cuatrimestre del segundo curso y tiene asignados 6 créditos troncales (3 teóricos + 3 prácticos). Los descriptores según BOE de esta asignatura son los siguientes: Organización, Estructura y Servicio de los Sistemas Operativos. Gestión y administración de memoria y de procesos. Gestión de entrada/salida. Sistema de ficheros.

Subjects

thread scheduling | thread scheduling | process | process | Arquitectura y Tecnología de Computadores | Arquitectura y Tecnología de Computadores | proceso | proceso | paginación | paginación | programmed I/O | programmed I/O | process scheduling | process scheduling | entrada/salida | entrada/salida | planificación de procesos | planificación de procesos | controlador | controlador | virtual memory | virtual memory | input/output | input/output | disk space managemente | disk space managemente | E/S dirigida por interrupciones | E/S dirigida por interrupciones | system call | system call | gestión de espacio en disco | gestión de espacio en disco | files | files | llamada al sistema | llamada al sistema | entrada salida programada | entrada salida programada | page replacement algorithms | page replacement algorithms | discos | discos | intercambio | intercambio | controller | controller | pages tables | pages tables | algoritmos de reemplazamiento de páginas | algoritmos de reemplazamiento de páginas | directorios | directorios | ficheros | ficheros | swapping | swapping | thread | thread | tabla de páginas | tabla de páginas | dispositivo | dispositivo | directories | directories | disks | disks | devices | devices | paging | paging | gestión de memoria | gestión de memoria | interrupt-driven I/O | interrupt-driven I/O | memoria virtual | memoria virtual | memory management | memory management

License

Copyright 2009, by the Contributing Authors http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT) 6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 is reputed to be one of the most demanding classes at MIT, exhausting many students' time and creativity. The course covers digital design topics such as digital logic, sequential building blocks, finite-state machines, FPGAs, timing and synchronization. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, video, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs on state-of-the-art FPGA. 6.111 is reputed to be one of the most demanding classes at MIT, exhausting many students' time and creativity. The course covers digital design topics such as digital logic, sequential building blocks, finite-state machines, FPGAs, timing and synchronization. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, video, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs on state-of-the-art FPGA.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | digital systems laboratory | laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | digital logic | Boolean algebra | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | flip-flops | finite-state machines | finite-state machines | FSM | FSM | microprogrammed systems | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PAL | PROM | PROM | VHDL | VHDL | digital circuit design | digital circuit design | FPGA | FPGA | counters | counters | timing | timing | synchronization | synchronization | digital filters | digital filters | wireless communications | wireless communications | verilog | verilog

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT) 6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 covers digital design topics such as digital logic, flipflops, PALs, CPLDs, FPGAs, counters, timing, synchronization, and finite-state machines. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs. 6.111 covers digital design topics such as digital logic, flipflops, PALs, CPLDs, FPGAs, counters, timing, synchronization, and finite-state machines. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | digital systems laboratory | laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | digital logic | Boolean algebra | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | flip-flops | finite-state machines | finite-state machines | FSM | FSM | microprogrammed systems | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PAL | PROM | PROM | VHDL | VHDL | digital circuit design | digital circuit design | FPGA | FPGA | counters | counters | timing | timing | synchronization | synchronization | digital filters | digital filters | wireless communications | wireless communications | verilog | verilog | combinational logic | combinational logic | simple sequential circuits | simple sequential circuits | memories | memories | configurable logic | configurable logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT)

Description

Relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include: functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory. In order to improve writing skills in describing experiments and reviewing journal publications in neuroscience, students are required to complete four homework assignments and one literature review with revision. Technical RequirementsMedia player software, such as Quicktime Player, RealOne Player, or Windows Media Player, is required to run the .mp3 files found on this cou

Subjects

functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sleep | dreaming | motivation | reward | emotional displays | higher functions" | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sleep | dreaming | motivation | reward | emotional displays | higher functions | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory | Neurobehavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT) 6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 consists of lectures and labs on digital logic, flipflops, PALs, counters, timing, synchronization, finite-state machines, and microprogrammed systems. Students are expected to design and implement a final project of their choice: games, music, digital filters, graphics, etc. The course requires extensive use of VHDL for describing and implementing digital logic designs. 6.111 is worth 12 Engineering Design Points. 6.111 consists of lectures and labs on digital logic, flipflops, PALs, counters, timing, synchronization, finite-state machines, and microprogrammed systems. Students are expected to design and implement a final project of their choice: games, music, digital filters, graphics, etc. The course requires extensive use of VHDL for describing and implementing digital logic designs. 6.111 is worth 12 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | digital systems laboratory | laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | digital logic | Boolean algebra | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | flip-flops | finite-state machines | finite-state machines | FSM | FSM | microprogrammed systems | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PAL | PROM | PROM | VHDL | VHDL | digital circuit design | digital circuit design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.344 Tumor Suppressor Gene p53: How the Guardian of our Genome Prevents Cancer (MIT) 7.344 Tumor Suppressor Gene p53: How the Guardian of our Genome Prevents Cancer (MIT)

Description

Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Cancer involves uncontrolled cell growth, resistance to cell death, failure to differentiate into a particular cell type, and increased cellular motility. A family of gate-keeper genes, known as tumor suppressor genes, plays important roles in preventing the initiation and progression of cancer. Among these, p53 is the most famous. Because of its essential role in maintaining genomic integrity, p53 is often called the guardian of the genome. During this course, we will study how p53 serves as a pivotal tumor suppressor gene in preventing cancer.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to disc Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Cancer involves uncontrolled cell growth, resistance to cell death, failure to differentiate into a particular cell type, and increased cellular motility. A family of gate-keeper genes, known as tumor suppressor genes, plays important roles in preventing the initiation and progression of cancer. Among these, p53 is the most famous. Because of its essential role in maintaining genomic integrity, p53 is often called the guardian of the genome. During this course, we will study how p53 serves as a pivotal tumor suppressor gene in preventing cancer.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to disc

Subjects

tumor suppressor gene | tumor suppressor gene | p53 | p53 | p53 protein | p53 protein | cancer | cancer | cell-growth signals | cell-growth signals | cell cycle regulation | cell cycle regulation | DNA damage | DNA damage | DNA repair | DNA repair | programmed cell death | programmed cell death | apoptosis | apoptosis | genome integrity | genome integrity | oncogenes | oncogenes | p53 mutations | p53 mutations | mouse cancer models | mouse cancer models | Mdm2 | Mdm2 | microRNA | microRNA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe

Subjects

ubiquitination | ubiquitin | proteasome | post-translational mechanisms | ubiquitin-conjugation system | neurodegenerative diseases | immune response | cell cycle regulation | apoptosis | signal transduction pathways | tumorigenesis | protein degradation | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | ligases | translocated proteins | misfolded proteins | trafficking membranes | cell cycle control | programmed cell death | Huntington's Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 covers digital design topics such as digital logic, flipflops, PALs, CPLDs, FPGAs, counters, timing, synchronization, and finite-state machines. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | finite-state machines | FSM | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PROM | VHDL | digital circuit design | FPGA | counters | timing | synchronization | digital filters | wireless communications | verilog | combinational logic | simple sequential circuits | memories | configurable logic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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U-Boat 110, the Torpedo Room showing an overhead arrangement

Description

This photograph shows the U-Boat 110, a German Submarine that was sunk and risen in 1918. This photograph shows the Submarine's forward Torpedo Room. Reference: DS.SWH/5/3/2/14/1/9 This image is taken from an album of photographs found in the Swan Hunter shipbuilders collection at Tyne & Wear Archives. The album is from 1918 and documents the U.B. 110 before she was scrapped on the dry docks of Swan Hunter Wigham Richardson Ltd, Wallsend. The twin-screw German submarine U.B. 110 was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. On the 19th July 1918, when attacking a convoy of merchant ships near Hartlepool, she herself was attacked by H.M. Motor-Launch No. 263 and suffered from depth charges. Coming to the surface she was rammed by H.M.S. Garry, a torpedo boat destroyer, and sunk. In September she was salvaged and placed in the admiralty dock off Jarrow slake. She was then berthed at Swan Hunter's dry docks department with an order to restore her as a fighting unit. The Armistice on 11th November 1918 caused work on her to be stopped. She was towed on the 19th December 1918 from Wallsend to the Northumberland Dock at Howdon and was subsequently sold as scrap. The album of photographs, taken by Frank & Sons of South Shields, documents the U.B. 110 in extensive detail. The photographs provide a rare glimpse into the mechanics and atmosphere of the raised German submarine. More images of the U-Boat 110 can be viewed here. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

submarine | uboat | german | firstworldwar | steampunk | wheels | maritimeheritage | naval | blackandwhitephotograph | uboat110 | torpedoroom | overheadarrangement | germansubmarine | sunk | risen | 1918 | forwardtorpedoroom | swanhuntershipbuilderscollection | service | bloh | swanhunterwighamrichardsonltd | wallsend | blohmvoss | tube | pipe | hamburg | 19thjuly1918 | attacked | hmmotorlaunchno263 | depthcharges | rammed | hmsgarry | torpedoboatdestroyer | sinking | salvaged | admiraltydock | jarrowslake | berthed | drydocksdepartment | swanhunters | restoration | armistice | 11november1918 | 19december1918 | northumberlanddock | howden | scrap | franksons | southshields | mechanical | mechanics | impressive | industry | industrial | parts | cylinder | wire | wheel | handle | blur | detail | grain | mark | bolt | nut | metal | steel | plate | lid | number | identification | thesinkingandraisingofuboat110 | surreal | fastener | label

License

No known copyright restrictions

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9.01 Neuroscience and Behavior (MIT)

Description

This course covers the relation of structure and function at various levels of neuronal integration. Topics include functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, centrally programmed behavior, sensory systems, sleep and dreaming, motivation and reward, emotional displays of various types, "higher functions" and the neocortex, and neural processes in learning and memory.

Subjects

functional neuroanatomy | functional neurophysiology | motor systems | centrally programmed behavior | sensory systems | sleep | dreaming | motivation | reward | emotional displays | higher functions | neocortex | neural processes in learning and memory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.344 Tumor Suppressor Gene p53: How the Guardian of our Genome Prevents Cancer (MIT)

Description

Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Cancer involves uncontrolled cell growth, resistance to cell death, failure to differentiate into a particular cell type, and increased cellular motility. A family of gate-keeper genes, known as tumor suppressor genes, plays important roles in preventing the initiation and progression of cancer. Among these, p53 is the most famous. Because of its essential role in maintaining genomic integrity, p53 is often called the guardian of the genome. During this course, we will study how p53 serves as a pivotal tumor suppressor gene in preventing cancer.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to disc

Subjects

tumor suppressor gene | p53 | p53 protein | cancer | cell-growth signals | cell cycle regulation | DNA damage | DNA repair | programmed cell death | apoptosis | genome integrity | oncogenes | p53 mutations | mouse cancer models | Mdm2 | microRNA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 is reputed to be one of the most demanding classes at MIT, exhausting many students' time and creativity. The course covers digital design topics such as digital logic, sequential building blocks, finite-state machines, FPGAs, timing and synchronization. The semester begins with lectures and problem sets, to introduce fundamental topics before students embark on lab assignments and ultimately, a digital design project. The students design and implement a final digital project of their choice, in areas such as games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, video, and graphics. The course relies on extensive use of Verilog® for describing and implementing digital logic designs on state-of-the-art FPGA.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | finite-state machines | FSM | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PROM | VHDL | digital circuit design | FPGA | counters | timing | synchronization | digital filters | wireless communications | verilog

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 The Radical Consequences of Respiration: Reactive Oxygen Species in Aging and Disease (MIT)

Description

This course will start with a survey of basic oxygen radical biochemistry followed by a discussion of the mechanisms of action of cellular as well as dietary antioxidants. After considering the normal physiological roles of oxidants, we will examine the effects of elevated ROS and a failure of cellular redox capacity on the rate of organismal and cellular aging as well as on the onset and progression of several major diseases that are often age-related. Topics will include ROS-induced effects on stem cell regeneration, insulin resistance, heart disease, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. The role of antioxidants in potential therapeutic strategies for modulating ROS levels will also be discussed. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology D

Subjects

reactive oxygen species | oxygen | ROS | energy | mitochondria | cell signaling | anti-pathogen | oxidative damage | oncogene | antioxidant | insulin resistance | diabetes | stem cell | neurodegenerative | ischemic | ATP | pathways | NADPH | nox | psd | programmed cell death | apoptosis | hsc | hematopoietic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.16 Experimental Molecular Biology: Biotechnology II (MIT)

Description

The course applies molecular biology and reverse genetics approaches to the study of apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), in Drosophila cells. RNA interference (RNAi), or double stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing, will be used to inhibit expression of candidate apoptosis-related genes in cultured Drosophila cells. Teams of 2 or 3 students will design and carry out experiments to address questions about the genes involved in the regulation and execution of PCD in this system. Some projects involve the use of DNA damaging agents or other cytotoxic chemicals or drugs to help understand the pathways that control a cell's decision to undergo apoptosis. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are provided.

Subjects

RNAi | RNA interference | programmed cell death | Drosophilia | PCD | mRNA | lab notebook | scientific writing | RT-PCR | S2 RNA | S2 | cell culture | genetic transcription | dsRNA | bioinformatics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe

Subjects

ubiquitination | ubiquitin | proteasome | post-translational mechanisms | ubiquitin-conjugation system | neurodegenerative diseases | immune response | cell cycle regulation | apoptosis | signal transduction pathways | tumorigenesis | protein degradation | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | ligases | translocated proteins | misfolded proteins | trafficking membranes | cell cycle control | programmed cell death | Huntington's Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.111 Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.111 consists of lectures and labs on digital logic, flipflops, PALs, counters, timing, synchronization, finite-state machines, and microprogrammed systems. Students are expected to design and implement a final project of their choice: games, music, digital filters, graphics, etc. The course requires extensive use of VHDL for describing and implementing digital logic designs. 6.111 is worth 12 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

digital systems laboratory | laboratory | digital logic | Boolean algebra | flip-flops | finite-state machines | FSM | microprogrammed systems | digital abstractions | digital paradigm | digital oscilloscopes | PAL | PROM | VHDL | digital circuit design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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