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14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT) 14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT)

Description

14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information 14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information

Subjects

macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research | macroeconomics research | analytical tools | analytical tools | analysis | analysis | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | coordintation | coordintation | incomplete markets | incomplete markets | technolgy | technolgy | distribution | distribution | employment | employment | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | demographics | demographics | complementarities | complementarities | amplification | amplification | recursive equilibria | recursive equilibria | uncertainty | uncertainty | morris | morris | shin | shin | global games | global games | policy | policy | price | price | aggregation | aggregation | social learning | social learning | dynamic adjustment | dynamic adjustment | business cycle | business cycle | heterogeneous agents | heterogeneous agents | savings | savings | utility | utility | aiyagari | aiyagari | steady state | steady state | krusell | krusell | smith | smith | idiosyncratic investment risk | idiosyncratic investment risk | growth | growth | fluctuations | fluctuations | heterogeneity | heterogeneity | optimal fiscal policy | optimal fiscal policy | time inconsistency | time inconsistency | reputation | reputation | information | information | coordination games | coordination games

License

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15.040 Game Theory for Managers (MIT) 15.040 Game Theory for Managers (MIT)

Description

This half-term course examines the choices that we make which affect others and the choices others make that affect us. Such situations are known as "games" and game-playing, while sounding whimsical, is serious business. Managers frequently play "games" both within the firm and outside it – with competitors, customers, regulators, and even capital markets! The goal of this course is to enhance a student's ability to think strategically in complex, interactive environments. Knowledge of game theory will give students an advantage in such strategic settings. The course is structured around three "themes for acquiring advantage in games": commitment / strategic moves, exploiting hidden information, and limited rationality. This half-term course examines the choices that we make which affect others and the choices others make that affect us. Such situations are known as "games" and game-playing, while sounding whimsical, is serious business. Managers frequently play "games" both within the firm and outside it – with competitors, customers, regulators, and even capital markets! The goal of this course is to enhance a student's ability to think strategically in complex, interactive environments. Knowledge of game theory will give students an advantage in such strategic settings. The course is structured around three "themes for acquiring advantage in games": commitment / strategic moves, exploiting hidden information, and limited rationality.

Subjects

game theory | game theory | strategy games | strategy games | strategic thinking | strategic thinking | business strategy | business strategy | strategic reasoning | strategic reasoning | rationality | rationality | dominant strategies | dominant strategies | first-mover advantage | first-mover advantage | conflict strategies | conflict strategies | strategic substitutes | strategic substitutes | strategic complements | strategic complements | dynamic pricing | dynamic pricing | entering new markets | entering new markets | new market entry | new market entry | brinksmanship | brinksmanship | negotiation | negotiation | negotiating | negotiating | auctions | auctions | auction theory | auction theory | revenue equivalence | revenue equivalence | bidding | bidding | information uncertainty | information uncertainty | risk manipulation | risk manipulation | adverse selection | adverse selection | moral hazard | moral hazard | strategic irrationality | strategic irrationality | prisoner's dilemma | prisoner's dilemma

License

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14.147 Topics in Game Theory (MIT) 14.147 Topics in Game Theory (MIT)

Description

This course is an advanced topics course on market and mechanism design. We will study existing or new market institutions, understand their properties, and think about whether they can be re-engineered or improved. Topics discussed include mechanism design, auction theory, one-sided matching in house allocation, two-sided matching, stochastic matching mechanisms, student assignment, and school choice. This course is an advanced topics course on market and mechanism design. We will study existing or new market institutions, understand their properties, and think about whether they can be re-engineered or improved. Topics discussed include mechanism design, auction theory, one-sided matching in house allocation, two-sided matching, stochastic matching mechanisms, student assignment, and school choice.

Subjects

game theory | game theory | mechanism design | mechanism design | auction theory | auction theory | one-sided matching | one-sided matching | house allocation | house allocation | market problems | market problems | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | stability | stability | many-to-one | many-to-one | one-to-one | one-to-one | small cores | small cores | large markets | large markets | stochastic matching mechanisms | stochastic matching mechanisms | student assignment | student assignment | school choice | school choice | resale markets | resale markets | dynamics | dynamics | simplicity | simplicity | robustness | robustness | limited rationality | limited rationality | message spaces | message spaces | sharing risk | sharing risk | decentralized exchanges | decentralized exchanges | over-the-counter exchanges | over-the-counter exchanges

License

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14.462 Advanced Macroeconomics II (MIT)

Description

14.462 is the second semester of the second-year Ph.D. macroeconomics sequence. The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets Optimal Fiscal Policy Time Inconsistency Reputation Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities Information

Subjects

macroeconomics research; analytical tools; analysis; endogenous growth; coordintation; incomplete markets; technolgy; distribution; employment; intellectual property rights; bounded rationality; demographics; complementarities; amplification; recursive equilibria; uncertainty; morris; shin; global games; policy; price; aggregation; social learning; dynamic adjustment; business cycle; heterogeneous agents; savings; utility; aiyagari; steady state; krusell; smith; idiosyncratic investment risk | macroeconomics research | analytical tools | analysis | endogenous growth | coordintation | incomplete markets | technolgy | distribution | employment | intellectual property rights | bounded rationality | demographics | complementarities | amplification | recursive equilibria | uncertainty | morris | shin | global games | policy | price | aggregation | social learning | dynamic adjustment | business cycle | heterogeneous agents | savings | utility | aiyagari | steady state | krusell | smith | idiosyncratic investment risk | growth | fluctuations | heterogeneity | optimal fiscal policy | time inconsistency | reputation | information | coordination games

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.727 Topics in Algebraic Geometry: Algebraic Surfaces (MIT) 18.727 Topics in Algebraic Geometry: Algebraic Surfaces (MIT)

Description

The main aims of this seminar will be to go over the classification of surfaces (Enriques-Castelnuovo for characteristic zero, Bombieri-Mumford for characteristic p), while working out plenty of examples, and treating their geometry and arithmetic as far as possible. The main aims of this seminar will be to go over the classification of surfaces (Enriques-Castelnuovo for characteristic zero, Bombieri-Mumford for characteristic p), while working out plenty of examples, and treating their geometry and arithmetic as far as possible.

Subjects

near equivalence | near equivalence | algebraic equivalence | algebraic equivalence | numerical equivalence | numerical equivalence | birational | birational | rational | rational | maps | maps | surfaces | surfaces | ruled surfaces | ruled surfaces | rational surfaces | rational surfaces | linear systems | linear systems | castelnuovo's criterion | castelnuovo's criterion | rationality | rationality | picard | picard | albanese | albanese | classification | classification | K3 | K3 | elliptic | elliptic | Kodaira dimension | Kodaira dimension | bielliptic | bielliptic

License

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24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT) 24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology, and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; and, virtues and character traits. This course is a CI-M course. This course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology, and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; and, virtues and character traits. This course is a CI-M course.

Subjects

action | action | motivation | motivation | social psychology | social psychology | sociology | sociology | belief | belief | desire | desire | moral motivation | moral motivation | sympathy | sympathy | empathy | empathy | intention | intention | will | will | addiction | addiction | resolution | resolution | rationality | rationality | identification | identification | autonomy | autonomy | egoism | egoism | altruism | altruism | intentions | intentions | Humean theory of motivation | Humean theory of motivation | willing | willing | wanting | wanting | waiting | waiting | weakness | weakness | Akrasia | Akrasia | self-control | self-control | temptation | temptation | self-regulation | self-regulation | free will | free will | self-deception | self-deception | moral psychology | moral psychology | empirical work | empirical work | autism | autism | ethical judgment | ethical judgment | moral luck | moral luck | virtue | virtue

License

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15.040 Game Theory for Managers (MIT)

Description

This half-term course examines the choices that we make which affect others and the choices others make that affect us. Such situations are known as "games" and game-playing, while sounding whimsical, is serious business. Managers frequently play "games" both within the firm and outside it – with competitors, customers, regulators, and even capital markets! The goal of this course is to enhance a student's ability to think strategically in complex, interactive environments. Knowledge of game theory will give students an advantage in such strategic settings. The course is structured around three "themes for acquiring advantage in games": commitment / strategic moves, exploiting hidden information, and limited rationality.

Subjects

game theory | strategy games | strategic thinking | business strategy | strategic reasoning | rationality | dominant strategies | first-mover advantage | conflict strategies | strategic substitutes | strategic complements | dynamic pricing | entering new markets | new market entry | brinksmanship | negotiation | negotiating | auctions | auction theory | revenue equivalence | bidding | information uncertainty | risk manipulation | adverse selection | moral hazard | strategic irrationality | prisoner's dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT) 14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena. This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect | prospect | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | economics | economics | behavior | behavior | preferences | preferences | cognition | cognition | trust | trust | vengence | vengence | impatience | impatience | impulsivity | impulsivity | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | reinforcement | reinforcement | classical conditioning | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | loss-aversion | over-confidence | over-confidence | self-serving biases | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | equilibrium | rational choice | rational choice | utility maximization | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | game theory | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT) 14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process. This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | heuristics | heuristics | noise | noise | confusion | confusion | competition | competition | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | games | games | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | consumption | hyperbolics | hyperbolics | temptation | temptation | assets | assets | puzzles | puzzles | bubbles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

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Philosophy of language and mind

Description

Language and Mind: What is rationality? What is consciousness? How do we manage to express our thoughts and experiences in language? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | rationality | consciousness | philosophy | rationality | consciousness

License

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24.03 Relativism, Reason, and Reality (MIT) 24.03 Relativism, Reason, and Reality (MIT)

Description

Are moral standards relative to cultures and/or moral frameworks? Are there incompatible or non-comparable ways of thinking about the world that are somehow equally good? Is science getting closer to the truth? Is rationality--the notion of a good reason to believe something--relative to cultural norms? What are selves? Is there a coherent form of relativism about the self? Guided by the writings of Thomas Kuhn, Gilbert Harman, Judith Thomson, John Perry and Derek Parfit, we attempt to make these vague questions precise, and we make a start at answering them. Are moral standards relative to cultures and/or moral frameworks? Are there incompatible or non-comparable ways of thinking about the world that are somehow equally good? Is science getting closer to the truth? Is rationality--the notion of a good reason to believe something--relative to cultural norms? What are selves? Is there a coherent form of relativism about the self? Guided by the writings of Thomas Kuhn, Gilbert Harman, Judith Thomson, John Perry and Derek Parfit, we attempt to make these vague questions precise, and we make a start at answering them.

Subjects

relativism | relativism | moral standards | moral standards | science | science | truth | truth | rationality | rationality | cultural norms | cultural norms | Thomas Kuhn | Thomas Kuhn | Karl Popper | Karl Popper | Gilbert Harman | Gilbert Harman | Judith Thomson | Judith Thomson | Derek Parfit | Derek Parfit

License

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Philosophy of language and mind

Description

Language and Mind: What is rationality? What is consciousness? How do we manage to express our thoughts and experiences in language? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

philosophy | rationality | consciousness | philosophy | rationality | consciousness

License

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24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT) 24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT)

Description

The course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; virtues and character traits. The course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; virtues and character traits.

Subjects

action | action | motivation | motivation | social psychology | social psychology | sociology | sociology | beleif | beleif | desire | desire | moral motivation | moral motivation | sympathy | sympathy | empathy | empathy | intention | intention | will | will | addiction | addiction | resolution | resolution | rationality | rationality | identification | identification | autonomy | autonomy

License

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24.951 Introduction to Syntax (MIT) 24.951 Introduction to Syntax (MIT)

Description

This course is concerned with the concepts and principles which have been of central significance in the recent development of syntactic theory, with special focus on the "Government and Binding" (GB) / "Principles and Parameters" (P&P) / "Minimalist Program" (MP) approach. It is the first of a series of two courses (24.951 is taught during the Fall and 24.952 is taught in the Spring). This course deals mostly with phrase structure, argument structure and its syntactic expression, including "A-movement". Though other issues (e.g. wh-movement, antecedent-contained deletion, extraposition) may be mentioned during the semester, the course will not systematically investigate these topics in class until 24.952. The goal of the course is to understand This course is concerned with the concepts and principles which have been of central significance in the recent development of syntactic theory, with special focus on the "Government and Binding" (GB) / "Principles and Parameters" (P&P) / "Minimalist Program" (MP) approach. It is the first of a series of two courses (24.951 is taught during the Fall and 24.952 is taught in the Spring). This course deals mostly with phrase structure, argument structure and its syntactic expression, including "A-movement". Though other issues (e.g. wh-movement, antecedent-contained deletion, extraposition) may be mentioned during the semester, the course will not systematically investigate these topics in class until 24.952. The goal of the course is to understand

Subjects

linguistics | linguistics | syntax | syntax | government | government | binding theory | binding theory | principles | principles | parameters | parameters | minimalist program | minimalist program | phrase structure | phrase structure | argument | argument | syntactic expression | syntactic expression | passives | passives | unaccusativity | unaccusativity | relational grammar | relational grammar | lexical | lexical | functional | functional | case | case | licensing | licensing | null bubjects | null bubjects | control | control | head movement | head movement | nonconfigurationality | nonconfigurationality | double objects | double objects | psych verbs | psych verbs

License

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21L.017 The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability (MIT) 21L.017 The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability (MIT)

Description

"The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course "The Art of the Probable" addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world. Our course

Subjects

philosophy | philosophy | scientific thought | scientific thought | scientific method | scientific method | mathematics | mathematics | chance | chance | risk | risk | statistics | statistics | history of science | history of science | quantitative measurement | quantitative measurement | chaos | chaos | uncertainty | uncertainty | induction | induction | deduction | deduction | inference | inference | luck | luck | gambling | gambling | cause and effect | cause and effect | games of chance | games of chance | fate | fate | prediction | prediction | rationality | rationality | decision making | decision making | religion | religion | randomness | randomness | knowledge | knowledge | fact | fact | human nature | human nature | mind | mind | senses | senses | intelligence | intelligence | metaphor | metaphor | Darwinism | Darwinism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ES.113 Ancient Greek Philosophy and Mathematics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics. We investigate how ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality / irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry. The course examines how discovery of the incommensurability of magnitudes challenged the Greek presumption that the cosmos is fully understandable. Students explore the influence of mathematics on ancient Greek ethical theories. We read such authors as: Euclid, Plato, Aristotle, Nicomachus, Theon of Smyrna, Bacon, Descartes, Dedekind, and Newton.

Subjects

Greek | philosophy | mathematics | definition | reason | argument | proof | rationality | irrationality | truth | ethics | Euclid | Plato | Aristotle | Nicomachus | Theon of Smyrna | Bacon | Descartes | Dededkind | Newton

License

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17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT) 17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT)

Description

This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed. This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed.

Subjects

social action | social action | rational choice | rational choice | riots | riots | rebellions | rebellions | revolutions | revolutions | rationality | rationality | j-curve | j-curve | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | peasant movement | peasant movement | Vietnam | Vietnam | politics | politics | insurgency | insurgency | civil war | civil war | ethnicity | ethnicity | race riot | race riot | urban riot | urban riot | Rodney King | Rodney King | relative deprivation | relative deprivation | Spilerman | Spilerman | racial disturbances | racial disturbances | protest | protest | nationalist violence | nationalist violence | USSR | USSR | Balkans | Balkans | ethnic polarization | ethnic polarization | Kosovo | Kosovo | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Mali | Mali

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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John Broome on Rationality

Description

John Broome, White's Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Oxford, gives an explanation of reason and rationality, and then discusses his understanding of the 'the normative question'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

reason | philosophy | normative | rationality | reason | philosophy | normative | rationality

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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15.040 Game Theory for Managers (MIT)

Description

This half-term course examines the choices that we make which affect others and the choices others make that affect us. Such situations are known as "games" and game-playing, while sounding whimsical, is serious business. Managers frequently play "games" both within the firm and outside it – with competitors, customers, regulators, and even capital markets! The goal of this course is to enhance a student's ability to think strategically in complex, interactive environments. Knowledge of game theory will give students an advantage in such strategic settings. The course is structured around three "themes for acquiring advantage in games": commitment / strategic moves, exploiting hidden information, and limited rationality.

Subjects

game theory | strategy games | strategic thinking | business strategy | strategic reasoning | rationality | dominant strategies | first-mover advantage | conflict strategies | strategic substitutes | strategic complements | dynamic pricing | entering new markets | new market entry | brinksmanship | negotiation | negotiating | auctions | auction theory | revenue equivalence | bidding | information uncertainty | risk manipulation | adverse selection | moral hazard | strategic irrationality | prisoner's dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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John Broome on Rationality

Description

John Broome, White's Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Oxford, gives an explanation of reason and rationality, and then discusses his understanding of the 'the normative question'.

Subjects

reason | philosophy | normative | rationality | reason | philosophy | normative | rationality

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21A.260 Culture, Embodiment and the Senses (MIT) 21A.260 Culture, Embodiment and the Senses (MIT)

Description

Culture, Embodiment, and the Senses will provide an historical and cross-cultural analysis of the politics of sensory experience. The subject will address western philosophical debates about mind, brain, emotion, and the body and the historical value placed upon sight, reason, and rationality, versus smell, taste, and touch as acceptable modes of knowing and knowledge production. We will assess cultural traditions that challenge scientific interpretations of experience arising from western philosophical and physiological models. The class will examine how sensory experience lies beyond the realm of individual physiological or psychological responses and occurs within a culturally elaborated field of social relations. Finally, we will debate how discourse about the senses is a product of pa Culture, Embodiment, and the Senses will provide an historical and cross-cultural analysis of the politics of sensory experience. The subject will address western philosophical debates about mind, brain, emotion, and the body and the historical value placed upon sight, reason, and rationality, versus smell, taste, and touch as acceptable modes of knowing and knowledge production. We will assess cultural traditions that challenge scientific interpretations of experience arising from western philosophical and physiological models. The class will examine how sensory experience lies beyond the realm of individual physiological or psychological responses and occurs within a culturally elaborated field of social relations. Finally, we will debate how discourse about the senses is a product of pa

Subjects

Anthropology | Anthropology | culture | culture | embodiment | embodiment | senses | senses | historical | historical | cross-cultural analysis | cross-cultural analysis | politics | politics | sensory experience | sensory experience | western philosophical debates | western philosophical debates | mind | mind | brain | brain | emotion | emotion | body | body | sight | sight | reason | reason | rationality | rationality | smell | smell | taste | taste | touch | touch | knowing | knowing | knowledge production | knowledge production | scientific interpretations | scientific interpretations | western philosophical | western philosophical | physiological models | physiological models | individual physiological | individual physiological | psychological responses | psychological responses | social relations | social relations | power relations | power relations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT) 21A.460J Medicine, Religion and Politics in Africa and the African Diaspora (MIT)

Description

This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora. This course provides an exploration of colonial and postcolonial clashes between theories of healing and embodiment in the African world and those of western bio-medicine. It examines how Afro-Atlantic religious traditions have challenged western conceptions of illness, healing, and the body and have also offered alternative notions of morality, rationality, kinship, gender, and sexuality. It also analyzes whether contemporary western bio-medical interventions reinforce colonial or imperial power in the effort to promote global health in Africa and the African diaspora.

Subjects

21A.460 | 21A.460 | WGS.620 | WGS.620 | Medicine | Medicine | Religion | Religion | Politics Africa | Politics Africa | African Diaspora | African Diaspora | colonial | colonial | postcolonial clashes | postcolonial clashes | theories of healing | theories of healing | embodiment; western | embodiment; western | bio-medicine | bio-medicine | Afro-Atlantic | Afro-Atlantic | traditions | traditions | illness | illness | healing | healing | body | body | alternative | alternative | morality | morality | rationality | rationality | kinship | kinship | gender | gender | sexuality; imperial | sexuality; imperial | power | power | global | global | health. | health. | embodiment | embodiment | western | western | sexuality | sexuality | imperial | imperial | health | health | SP.620J | SP.620J | SP.620 | SP.620

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.271 Industrial Organization I (MIT) 14.271 Industrial Organization I (MIT)

Description

The course provides a graduate level introduction to Industrial Organization. It is designed to provide a broad introduction to topics and industries that current researchers are studying as well as to expose students to a wide variety of techniques. It will start the process of preparing economics PhD students to conduct thesis research in the area, and may also be of interest to doctoral students working in other areas of economics and related fields. The course integrates theoretical models and empirical studies. The course provides a graduate level introduction to Industrial Organization. It is designed to provide a broad introduction to topics and industries that current researchers are studying as well as to expose students to a wide variety of techniques. It will start the process of preparing economics PhD students to conduct thesis research in the area, and may also be of interest to doctoral students working in other areas of economics and related fields. The course integrates theoretical models and empirical studies.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | economics | economics | theoretical models | theoretical models | empirical studies | empirical studies | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | durable goods | durable goods | price discrimination | price discrimination | static competition | static competition | differentiation models | differentiation models | oligopoly | oligopoly | networks | networks | dynamic competition | dynamic competition | two-sided markets | two-sided markets | mergers | mergers | pricing | pricing | industry | industry | strategic investment | strategic investment | firm entry | firm entry | entry prevention | entry prevention | predation | predation | limit pricing | limit pricing | auction theory | auction theory | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | advertising | advertising | patents | patents | technology diffusion | technology diffusion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.040 Game Theory for Managers (MIT)

Description

This half-term course examines the choices that we make which affect others and the choices others make that affect us. Such situations are known as "games" and game-playing, while sounding whimsical, is serious business. Managers frequently play "games" both within the firm and outside it – with competitors, customers, regulators, and even capital markets! The goal of this course is to enhance a student's ability to think strategically in complex, interactive environments. Knowledge of game theory will give students an advantage in such strategic settings. The course is structured around three "themes for acquiring advantage in games": commitment / strategic moves, exploiting hidden information, and limited rationality.

Subjects

game theory | strategy games | strategic thinking | business strategy | strategic reasoning | rationality | dominant strategies | first-mover advantage | conflict strategies | strategic substitutes | strategic complements | dynamic pricing | entering new markets | new market entry | brinksmanship | negotiation | negotiating | auctions | auction theory | revenue equivalence | bidding | information uncertainty | risk manipulation | adverse selection | moral hazard | strategic irrationality | prisoner's dilemma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Reality (MIT) Reality (MIT)

Description

An examination of philosophical issues on the theme of relativism. Are moral standards relative to cultures and/or moral frameworks? Are there incompatible or non-comparable ways of thinking about the world that are somehow equally good? Is science getting closer to the truth? Is rationality--the notion of a good reason to believe something--relative to cultural norms? What are selves? Is there a coherent form of relativism about the self? Discussion of these questions through the writings of contemporary philosophers such as Thomas Kuhn, Karl Popper, Gilbert Harman, Judith Thomson, and Derek Parfit. Emphasis on ways of making these vague questions precise, and critical evaluation of philosophical arguments. An examination of philosophical issues on the theme of relativism. Are moral standards relative to cultures and/or moral frameworks? Are there incompatible or non-comparable ways of thinking about the world that are somehow equally good? Is science getting closer to the truth? Is rationality--the notion of a good reason to believe something--relative to cultural norms? What are selves? Is there a coherent form of relativism about the self? Discussion of these questions through the writings of contemporary philosophers such as Thomas Kuhn, Karl Popper, Gilbert Harman, Judith Thomson, and Derek Parfit. Emphasis on ways of making these vague questions precise, and critical evaluation of philosophical arguments.

Subjects

relativism | relativism | moral standards | moral standards | science | science | truth | truth | rationality | rationality | cultural norms | cultural norms | Thomas Kuhn | Thomas Kuhn | Karl Popper | Karl Popper | Gilbert Harman | Gilbert Harman | Judith Thomson | Judith Thomson | Derek Parfit | Derek Parfit

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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