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21G.049 French Photography (MIT) 21G.049 French Photography (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the world of French photography from its invention in the 1820s to the present. It provides exposure to major photographers and images of the French tradition, and encourages students to explore the social and cultural roles and meanings of photographs. The class is designed to help students navigate their own photo-saturated worlds and provides an opportunity to gain practical experience in photography. Taught in English. This course introduces students to the world of French photography from its invention in the 1820s to the present. It provides exposure to major photographers and images of the French tradition, and encourages students to explore the social and cultural roles and meanings of photographs. The class is designed to help students navigate their own photo-saturated worlds and provides an opportunity to gain practical experience in photography. Taught in English.

Subjects

French | French | France | France | photography | photography | role in modern society | role in modern society | visual and formal analysis | visual and formal analysis | printed forms | printed forms | historical analysis | historical analysis | aesthetic trends | aesthetic trends | Dagguerre | Dagguerre | Dagguerrotype | Dagguerrotype | Barthes | Barthes | portraiture | portraiture | carte de visite | carte de visite | resemblance | resemblance | surrealism | surrealism | abstraction | abstraction | realism | realism | street photography | street photography | Kertesz | Kertesz | Baudelaire | Baudelaire | calotypomania | calotypomania | urbanism | urbanism | picture-taking | picture-taking | picture postcards | picture postcards | neo-realism | neo-realism | Sontag | Sontag | war photography | war photography | fashion | fashion | digital images | digital images | photo-sharing | photo-sharing | instagram | instagram | Ducros | Ducros

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.230 Meta-ethics (MIT) 24.230 Meta-ethics (MIT)

Description

This course considers a range of philosophical questions about the foundations of morality, such as whether and in what sense morality is objective, the nature of moral discourse, and how we can come to know right from wrong. This course considers a range of philosophical questions about the foundations of morality, such as whether and in what sense morality is objective, the nature of moral discourse, and how we can come to know right from wrong.

Subjects

moral statements | moral statements | morality | morality | ethics | ethics | ethical inquiry | ethical inquiry | scientific inquiry | scientific inquiry | right and wrong | right and wrong | moral realism | moral realism | plato | plato | naturalism | naturalism | moral anti-realism | moral anti-realism | non-cognitivism | non-cognitivism | reason | reason

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.445 International Relations Theory in the Cyber Age (MIT) 17.445 International Relations Theory in the Cyber Age (MIT)

Description

This course examines cyber dynamics and processes in international relations from different theoretical perspectives. It considers alternative theoretical and empirical frameworks consistent with characteristic features of cyberspace and emergent transformations at all levels of international interaction. Theories examined include realism and neorealism, institutionalism and liberalism, constructivism, and systems theory and lateral pressure. The course also highlights relevant features and proposes customized international relations theory for the cyber age. Students taking the graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research. This course examines cyber dynamics and processes in international relations from different theoretical perspectives. It considers alternative theoretical and empirical frameworks consistent with characteristic features of cyberspace and emergent transformations at all levels of international interaction. Theories examined include realism and neorealism, institutionalism and liberalism, constructivism, and systems theory and lateral pressure. The course also highlights relevant features and proposes customized international relations theory for the cyber age. Students taking the graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | cyber age | cyber age | globalization | globalization | security | security | realism | realism | neorealism | neorealism | governance | governance | institutionalism | institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | cyberpolitics | cyberpolitics | war | war | international conflict | international conflict | global agenda | global agenda | international cooperation | international cooperation | peace | peace | global politics | global politics | power | power | cyberspace | cyberspace | systems | systems | international organization | international organization | cyber security | cyber security | world politics | world politics | networks | networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations. This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | 21st century | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | realism | realism | liberalism | liberalism | institutionalism | institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | conflict | conflict | war | war | globalization | globalization | critical analysis | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | analytical structures | comparative analysis | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | contentions | environmentalism | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | warfare | transformations | transformations | structures | structures | processes | processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | drama | forbidden plays | forbidden plays | Modern America | Modern America | decision alley | decision alley | drama strategies | drama strategies | drama skills | drama skills | purchasing institution | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activity | drama activities | drama activities | writing opportunity | writing opportunity | last wolf | last wolf | learning medium | learning medium | literacy activities | literacy activities | writing opportunities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | foundation stage | assessment focus | assessment focus | two long lines | two long lines | dramatic activity | dramatic activity | action conventions | action conventions | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre | theatre | censorship | censorship | blacklist | blacklist | banned | banned | obscenity | obscenity | architecture | architecture | selective realism | selective realism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.065 Japanese Literature and Cinema (MIT) 21G.065 Japanese Literature and Cinema (MIT)

Description

This course includes surveys for both cinematic and literary representations of diverse eras and aspects of Japanese culture such as the classical era, the samurai age, wartime Japan and the atomic bombings, social change in the postwar period, and the appropriation of foreign cultural themes, with an emphasis on the modern period. The directors include Akira Kurosawa and Hiroshi Teshigahara. The authors include Kobo Abe and Yukio Mishima. The films are shown with subtitles in English. The course is taught in English. This course includes surveys for both cinematic and literary representations of diverse eras and aspects of Japanese culture such as the classical era, the samurai age, wartime Japan and the atomic bombings, social change in the postwar period, and the appropriation of foreign cultural themes, with an emphasis on the modern period. The directors include Akira Kurosawa and Hiroshi Teshigahara. The authors include Kobo Abe and Yukio Mishima. The films are shown with subtitles in English. The course is taught in English.

Subjects

japanese aesthetics | japanese aesthetics | suicide | suicide | pressure of daily life | pressure of daily life | gender | gender | sexuality | sexuality | contemporary japan | contemporary japan | traditional japan | traditional japan | anime | anime | surrealism | surrealism | false realism | false realism | the absurd | the absurd | humor | humor | japan | japan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations. This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | 21st century | political theory | political theory | international relations | international relations | realism | realism | liberalism | liberalism | institutionalism | institutionalism | constructivism | constructivism | conflict | conflict | war | war | globalization | globalization | critical analysis | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | analytical structures | comparative analysis | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | contentions | environmentalism | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | warfare | transformations | transformations | structures | structures | processes | processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.049 French Photography (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the world of French photography from its invention in the 1820s to the present. It provides exposure to major photographers and images of the French tradition, and encourages students to explore the social and cultural roles and meanings of photographs. The class is designed to help students navigate their own photo-saturated worlds and provides an opportunity to gain practical experience in photography. Taught in English.

Subjects

French | France | photography | role in modern society | visual and formal analysis | printed forms | historical analysis | aesthetic trends | Dagguerre | Dagguerrotype | Barthes | portraiture | carte de visite | resemblance | surrealism | abstraction | realism | street photography | Kertesz | Baudelaire | calotypomania | urbanism | picture-taking | picture postcards | neo-realism | Sontag | war photography | fashion | digital images | photo-sharing | instagram | Ducros

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.4 Making Sense of Perception

Description

Part 6.4. A brief overview of contemporary accounts of perception; including phenomenalism (that objects are logical constructions from sense data) and direct realism (that we perceive objects and the external world directly). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

idealism | perception | locke | philosophy | berkeley | phenomenalism | hume | austin | realism | strawson | idealism | perception | locke | philosophy | berkeley | phenomenalism | hume | austin | realism | strawson

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT) Gender Studies Seminar: Latina Women's Voices (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and social and political preoccupations play in shaping the values of the writers and the nature of the characters encountered in the texts and films. This course will explore the rich diversity of women's voices and experiences as reflected in writings and films by and about Latina writers, filmmakers, and artists. Through close readings, class discussions and independently researched student presentations related to each text, we will explore not only the unique, individual voice of the writer, but also the cultural, social and political contexts which inform their narratives. We will also examine the roles that gender, familial ties and social and political preoccupations play in shaping the values of the writers and the nature of the characters encountered in the texts and films.

Subjects

Latina | Latina | women | women | code-switching | code-switching | first generation | first generation | coming-of-age | coming-of-age | Chicana | Chicana | roots | roots | revolution | revolution | politics | politics | poverty | | poverty | | social criticism | social criticism | kinship | kinship | biography | biography | magic realism | magic realism | mythical historicism | mythical historicism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This course offers a critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. It also focuses on a comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. It also presents a discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations.

Subjects

21st century | political theory | international relations | realism | liberalism | institutionalism | constructivism | conflict | war | globalization | critical analysis | theoretical assumptions | analytical structures | comparative analysis | neo-realism | neo-liberalism | neo-institutionalism | contentions | environmentalism | emergent dynamics | evolutionary dynamics | warfare | transformations | structures | processes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.006 American Literature (MIT) 21L.006 American Literature (MIT)

Description

This is a HASS-D CI course. Like other communications-intensive courses in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, it allows students to produce 20 pages of polished writing with careful attention to revision. It also offers substantial opportunities for oral expression, through presentations of written work, student-led discussion, and class participation. The class has a low enrollment that ensures maximum attention to student writing and opportunity for oral expression, and a writing fellow/tutor is available for consultation on drafts and revisions. This is a HASS-D CI course. Like other communications-intensive courses in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, it allows students to produce 20 pages of polished writing with careful attention to revision. It also offers substantial opportunities for oral expression, through presentations of written work, student-led discussion, and class participation. The class has a low enrollment that ensures maximum attention to student writing and opportunity for oral expression, and a writing fellow/tutor is available for consultation on drafts and revisions.

Subjects

William Bradford | William Bradford | Mary Rowlandson | Mary Rowlandson | Jonathan Edwards | Jonathan Edwards | Benjamin Franklin | Benjamin Franklin | Olaudah Equiano | Olaudah Equiano | Phyllis Wheatley | Phyllis Wheatley | Washington Irving | Washington Irving | Ralph Waldo Emerson | Ralph Waldo Emerson | Henry David Thoreau | Henry David Thoreau | Nathaniel Hawthorne | Nathaniel Hawthorne | Frederick Douglass | Frederick Douglass | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Margaret Fuller | Margaret Fuller | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Harriet Beecher Stowe | Walt Whitman | Walt Whitman | Emily Dickinson | Emily Dickinson | realism | realism | satire | satire | Rebecca Harding Davis | Rebecca Harding Davis | Samuel Clemens | Samuel Clemens | Sarah Orne Jewett | Sarah Orne Jewett | Kate Chopin | Kate Chopin | Charlotte Perkins | Charlotte Perkins | Gilman | Gilman | Edith Wharton | Edith Wharton | revision | revision | Claude McKay | Claude McKay | Zora Neale Hurston | Zora Neale Hurston | Jean Toomer | Jean Toomer | Langston Hughes | Langston Hughes | Countee Cullen | Countee Cullen | Richard Wright | Richard Wright | Toni Morrison | Toni Morrison

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.4 Making Sense of Perception

Description

Part 6.4. A brief overview of contemporary accounts of perception; including phenomenalism (that objects are logical constructions from sense data) and direct realism (that we perceive objects and the external world directly). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

idealism | perception | locke | philosophy | berkeley | phenomenalism | hume | austin | realism | strawson | idealism | perception | locke | philosophy | berkeley | phenomenalism | hume | austin | realism | strawson

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | forbidden plays | Modern America | decision alley | drama strategies | drama skills | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activities | writing opportunity | last wolf | learning medium | literacy activities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | assessment focus | two long lines | dramatic activity | action conventions | literary arts | storytelling | poetry | live performance | ritual | entertainment | communities | social norms | audiences | plays | dramatic structure | performing arts | writing | discussion | writer | speaker | cultures | tools | fiction | ethical | historical | political | artistic | questions | creativity | self-awareness | communicate | theater | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | many theatre artists | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre | censorship | blacklist | banned | obscenity | architecture | selective realism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.006 American Literature (MIT) 21L.006 American Literature (MIT)

Description

This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison. This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison.

Subjects

novel | novel | literature | literature | poetry | poetry | America | America | American | American | independence | independence | Melville | Melville | Twain | Twain | Morrison | Morrison | realism | realism | satire | satire | history | history | biography | biography | Emerson | Emerson | Hawthorne | Hawthorne | Thoreau | Thoreau | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Dickinson | Dickinson | Wharton | Wharton | Hurston | Hurston | Rowlandson | Rowlandson | Douglass | Douglass

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Slade Lectures 2010: Week 1: Automatism and chance: Surrealist strategies and their legacies in contemporary art and film

Description

Dawn Ades, Professor of Art History and Theory at Essex University, gives the first Slade lecture in Surrealism and Art History on 20th January 2010. The Slade Professorship of Fine Art is the oldest professorship of art at the universities of Cambridge, Oxford and London. The chairs were founded concurrently in 1869 by a bequest from the art collector and philanthropist Felix Slade, with studentships also created in the University of London. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

art history | surrealism | dali | art | film | art history | surrealism | dali | art | film | 2010-01-20

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Slade Lectures 2010: Week 2: Beyond painting: collage, objects, installations

Description

Dawn Ades, Professor of Art History and Theory at Essex University gives the second Slade lecture in Surrealism and Art History on 27th January 2010. The Slade Professorship of Fine Art is the oldest professorship of art at the universities of Cambridge, Oxford and London. The chairs were founded concurrently in 1869 by a bequest from the art collector and philanthropist Felix Slade, with studentships also created in the University of London. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

art history | surrealism | dali | art | painting | art history | surrealism | dali | art | painting | 2010-01-27

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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, Georges Bataille and Documents

Description

Dawn Ades, Professor of Art History and Theory at Essex University, gives the third lecture in the Slade lecture series on Surrealism and Art History. The Slade Professorship of Fine Art is the oldest professorship of art at the universities of Cambridge, Oxford and London. The chairs were founded concurrently in 1869 by a bequest from the art collector and philanthropist Felix Slade, with studentships also created in the University of London. Please see the following link to the Southbank's Undercover Surrealism Exhibition from 2006 - http://ticketing.southbankcentre.co.uk/minisites/docs2/undercover/ Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

art history | bataille | art | dali | surrealism | painting | art history | bataille | art | dali | surrealism | painting | 2010-02-03

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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s Angelus

Description

Fourth Slade lecture from Dawn Ades, Professor of Art History and Theory at Essex University, given on 10th February 2010. The Slade Professorship of Fine Art is the oldest professorship of art at the universities of Cambridge, Oxford and London. The chairs were founded concurrently in 1869 by a bequest from the art collector and philanthropist Felix Slade, with studentships also created in the University of London. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

art history | art | dali | surrealism | painting | film | art history | art | dali | surrealism | painting | film | 2010-02-10

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Slade Lectures 2010: Week 5: Poetry, politics, and sexuality: Surrealism in Latin America

Description

Fifth lecture in the Slade lecture series given by Dawn Ades, Professor of Art History and Theory at Essex University in Surrealism and Art History on 17th February 2010. The Slade Professorship of Fine Art is the oldest professorship of art at the universities of Cambridge, Oxford and London. The chairs were founded concurrently in 1869 by a bequest from the art collector and philanthropist Felix Slade, with studentships also created in the University of London. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

art history | art | dali | surrealism | sexuality | painting | Latin America | art history | art | dali | surrealism | sexuality | painting | Latin America | 2010-02-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Slade Lectures 2010: Week 6: Monuments and ruins: Surrealism and archaeology in the New World

Description

Sixth lecture in the Slade lecture series on Surrealism and Art given by Dawn Ades, Professor of Art History and Theory at Essex University on 24th February 2010. The Slade Professorship of Fine Art is the oldest professorship of art at the universities of Cambridge, Oxford and London. The chairs were founded concurrently in 1869 by a bequest from the art collector and philanthropist Felix Slade, with studentships also created in the University of London. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

art history | art | dali | surrealism | painting | archaeology | art history | art | dali | surrealism | painting | archaeology | 2010-02-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Slade Lectures 2010: Week 7: Transnational Surrealism: Tropiques and the role of the little magazine

Description

Seventh lecture in the Slade lecture series on Surrealism and Art History given by Dawn Ades, Professor of Art History and Theory at Essex University on 3rd March 2010. The Slade Professorship of Fine Art is the oldest professorship of art at the universities of Cambridge, Oxford and London. The chairs were founded concurrently in 1869 by a bequest from the art collector and philanthropist Felix Slade, with studentships also created in the University of London. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

art history | surrealism | dali | art | painting | art history | surrealism | dali | art | painting | 2010-03-03

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Slade Lectures 2010: Week 8: Walking distance from the studio: cities, maps, and myths

Description

Eighth and final Slade Lecture in Surrealism and Art History given by Dawn Ades, Professor of Art History and Theory at Essex University on 10th March 2010. The Slade Professorship of Fine Art is the oldest professorship of art at the universities of Cambridge, Oxford and London. The chairs were founded concurrently in 1869 by a bequest from the art collector and philanthropist Felix Slade, with studentships also created in the University of London. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

art history | surrealism | art | myth | maps | art history | surrealism | art | myth | maps | 2010-03-10

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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