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20.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (BE.441) (MIT) 20.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (BE.441) (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to

Subjects

medical implants | medical implants | artificial organs | artificial organs | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | matrix | matrix | biomaterials | biomaterials | protein adsorption | protein adsorption | unit cell process | unit cell process | wound healing | wound healing | tissue remodeling | tissue remodeling | tissue regeneration | tissue regeneration | organ regeneration | organ regeneration | prosthesis | prosthesis | biodegradable | biodegradable | bioreplaceable implants | bioreplaceable implants | BE.441 | BE.441 | 2.79 | 2.79 | 3.96 | 3.96 | HST.522 | HST.522

License

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BE.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (MIT) BE.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to

Subjects

medical implants | medical implants | artificial organs | artificial organs | tissue engineering | tissue engineering | matrix | matrix | biomaterials | biomaterials | protein adsorption | protein adsorption | unit cell process | unit cell process | wound healing | wound healing | tissue remodeling | tissue remodeling | tissue regeneration | tissue regeneration | organ regeneration | organ regeneration | prosthesis | prosthesis | biodegradable | biodegradable | bioreplaceable implants | bioreplaceable implants | 2.79J | 2.79J | 3.96J | 3.96J | HST.522J | HST.522J | 2.79 | 2.79 | 3.96 | 3.96 | HST.522 | HST.522

License

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9.14 Brain Structure and its Origins (MIT) 9.14 Brain Structure and its Origins (MIT)

Description

This course covers major CNS structures with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include basic patterns of connections in CNS, embryogenesis, PNS anatomy and development, process outgrowth and synaptogenesis, growth factors and cell survival, spinal and hindbrain anatomy, and development of regional specificity with an introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution. A review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture) is also covered as well as the trigeminal system, retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration, neocortex anatomy and development, the olfactory system, corpus striatum, brain transplants, the limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity. This course covers major CNS structures with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include basic patterns of connections in CNS, embryogenesis, PNS anatomy and development, process outgrowth and synaptogenesis, growth factors and cell survival, spinal and hindbrain anatomy, and development of regional specificity with an introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution. A review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture) is also covered as well as the trigeminal system, retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration, neocortex anatomy and development, the olfactory system, corpus striatum, brain transplants, the limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.

Subjects

CNS structures | CNS structures | development | development | plasticity | plasticity | anatomy | anatomy | tissue culture | tissue culture | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | PNS anatomy and development | PNS anatomy and development | process outgrowth | process outgrowth | synaptogenesis | synaptogenesis | growth factors | growth factors | cell survival | cell survival | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | comparative anatomy | comparative anatomy | CNS evolution | CNS evolution | trigeminal system | trigeminal system | retinotectal system | retinotectal system | regeneration | regeneration | neocortex anatomy | neocortex anatomy | olfactory system | olfactory system | corpus striatum | corpus striatum | brain transplants | brain transplants | limbic system | limbic system | Development | Development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Development of the Mammalian Brain (MIT) Development of the Mammalian Brain (MIT)

Description

Lectures plus guided readings and discussion with project reports, covering major CNS structures, with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include: basic patterns of connections in CNS; review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture); embryogenesis; PNS anatomy and development; process outgrowth and synaptogenesis; growth factors and cell survival; spinal and hindbrain anatomy; development of regional specificity with introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution; trigeminal system; retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration; neocortex anatomy and development; olfactory system; corpus striatum; brain transplants; limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.Technical RequirementsMedia play Lectures plus guided readings and discussion with project reports, covering major CNS structures, with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include: basic patterns of connections in CNS; review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture); embryogenesis; PNS anatomy and development; process outgrowth and synaptogenesis; growth factors and cell survival; spinal and hindbrain anatomy; development of regional specificity with introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution; trigeminal system; retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration; neocortex anatomy and development; olfactory system; corpus striatum; brain transplants; limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.Technical RequirementsMedia play

Subjects

CNS structures | CNS structures | development | development | plasticity | plasticity | anatomy | anatomy | tissue culture | tissue culture | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | PNS anatomy and development | PNS anatomy and development | process outgrowth | process outgrowth | synaptogenesis | synaptogenesis | growth factors | growth factors | cell survival | cell survival | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | comparative anatomy | comparative anatomy | CNS evolution | CNS evolution | trigeminal system | trigeminal system | retinotectal system | retinotectal system | regeneration | regeneration | neocortex anatomy | neocortex anatomy | olfactory system | olfactory system | corpus striatum | corpus striatum | brain transplants | brain transplants | limbic system | limbic system | Mammals -- Physiology | Mammals -- Physiology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 When Development Goes Awry: How Cancer Co-opts Mechanisms of Embryogensis (MIT) 7.343 When Development Goes Awry: How Cancer Co-opts Mechanisms of Embryogensis (MIT)

Description

During this course, we will study the similarities between cancer and normal development to understand how tumors co-opt normal developmental processes to facilitate cancer initiation, maintenance and progression. We will examine critical signaling pathways that govern these processes and, importantly, how some of these pathways hold promise as therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. We will discuss how future treatments might be personalized to target cancer cells in specific patients. We will also consider examples of newly-approved drugs that have dramatically helped patients combat this devastating disease. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary res During this course, we will study the similarities between cancer and normal development to understand how tumors co-opt normal developmental processes to facilitate cancer initiation, maintenance and progression. We will examine critical signaling pathways that govern these processes and, importantly, how some of these pathways hold promise as therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. We will discuss how future treatments might be personalized to target cancer cells in specific patients. We will also consider examples of newly-approved drugs that have dramatically helped patients combat this devastating disease. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary res

Subjects

cancer | cancer | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | sonic hedgehog | sonic hedgehog | tumor | tumor | signaling | signaling | proto-oncogene | proto-oncogene | Kras | Kras | apoptosis | apoptosis | self-renewal | self-renewal | regeneration | regeneration | angiogenesis | angiogenesis | VEGF | VEGF | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | metastasis | metastasis | microRNA | microRNA

License

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7.342 Reading the Blueprint of Life: Transcription, Stem Cells and Differentiation (MIT) 7.342 Reading the Blueprint of Life: Transcription, Stem Cells and Differentiation (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will address how transcriptional regulators both prohibit and drive differentiation during the course of development. How does a stem cell know when to remain a stem cell and when to become a specific cell type? Are there global differences in the way the genome is read in multipotent and terminally differentiated cells? We will explore how stem cell pluripotency is preserved, how master regulators of cell-fate decisions execute developmental programs, and how chromatin regulators control undifferentiated versus differentiated states. Additionally, we will discuss how aberrant regulation of transcriptional regulators produces disorders such as developmental defects and cancer.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at In this course, we will address how transcriptional regulators both prohibit and drive differentiation during the course of development. How does a stem cell know when to remain a stem cell and when to become a specific cell type? Are there global differences in the way the genome is read in multipotent and terminally differentiated cells? We will explore how stem cell pluripotency is preserved, how master regulators of cell-fate decisions execute developmental programs, and how chromatin regulators control undifferentiated versus differentiated states. Additionally, we will discuss how aberrant regulation of transcriptional regulators produces disorders such as developmental defects and cancer.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at

Subjects

blueprint of life | blueprint of life | transcription | transcription | stem cells | stem cells | differentiation | differentiation | human tissues | human tissues | tissue regeneration | tissue regeneration | human disease | human disease | RNA and protein expression patterns | RNA and protein expression patterns | transcriptional regulation | transcriptional regulation | specialized gene expression programs | specialized gene expression programs | genome | genome | multipotent | multipotent | terminally differentiated | terminally differentiated | pluripotency | pluripotency | master regulators | master regulators | chromatin regulators | chromatin regulators | developmental defects | developmental defects | cancer | cancer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.333 Urban Design Seminar (MIT) 11.333 Urban Design Seminar (MIT)

Description

This course is a requirement for completion of the Urban Design Certificate Program. It investigates the complex nature of 'successful' urban design and attempts to identify and evaluate examples of urban design that are at the leading edge of practice, anticipating the future. The seminar will deal with two parallel questions: what are the key trends that will shape the future form and function of cities, and how will these changes affect the role of the urban designer? The first part of the seminar focuses on the present, and the second part of the semester will consider the future. After the course surveys the landscape of contemporary urban design practice, the challenge it will pose to students will be to identify the trajectory of cities and city design from both physical and socia This course is a requirement for completion of the Urban Design Certificate Program. It investigates the complex nature of 'successful' urban design and attempts to identify and evaluate examples of urban design that are at the leading edge of practice, anticipating the future. The seminar will deal with two parallel questions: what are the key trends that will shape the future form and function of cities, and how will these changes affect the role of the urban designer? The first part of the seminar focuses on the present, and the second part of the semester will consider the future. After the course surveys the landscape of contemporary urban design practice, the challenge it will pose to students will be to identify the trajectory of cities and city design from both physical and socia

Subjects

urban design | urban design | design competitions | design competitions | past and future design trends | past and future design trends | elderly housing | elderly housing | neighborhood design | neighborhood design | housing and technology | housing and technology | workplace design | workplace design | mediated space | mediated space | public spaces and technology | public spaces and technology | schools and technology | schools and technology | cultural regeneration | cultural regeneration | arts districts | arts districts | museums | museums | interpretive pathways | interpretive pathways | waterfront design | waterfront design | natural systems | natural systems | environmental sustainability | environmental sustainability | urban design education | urban design education

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.14 Brain Structure and Its Origins (MIT) 9.14 Brain Structure and Its Origins (MIT)

Description

Outline of mammalian functional neuroanatomy, aided by studies of comparative neuroanatomy and evolution, and of brain development. Topics include early steps to a central nervous system, basic patterns of brain and spinal cord connections, regional development and differentiation, regeneration, motor and sensory pathways and structures, systems underlying motivations, innate action patterns, formation of habits, and various cognitive functions. Lab techniques reviewed. Optional brain dissections. Outline of mammalian functional neuroanatomy, aided by studies of comparative neuroanatomy and evolution, and of brain development. Topics include early steps to a central nervous system, basic patterns of brain and spinal cord connections, regional development and differentiation, regeneration, motor and sensory pathways and structures, systems underlying motivations, innate action patterns, formation of habits, and various cognitive functions. Lab techniques reviewed. Optional brain dissections.

Subjects

CNS structures | CNS structures | development | development | plasticity | plasticity | anatomy | anatomy | tissue culture | tissue culture | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | PNS anatomy and development | PNS anatomy and development | process outgrowth | process outgrowth | synaptogenesis | synaptogenesis | growth factors | growth factors | cell survival | cell survival | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | comparative anatomy | comparative anatomy | CNS evolution | CNS evolution | trigeminal system | trigeminal system | retinotectal system | retinotectal system | regeneration | regeneration | neocortex anatomy | neocortex anatomy | olfactory system | olfactory system | corpus striatum | corpus striatum | brain transplants | brain transplants | limbic system | limbic system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (BE.441) (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to

Subjects

medical implants | artificial organs | tissue engineering | matrix | biomaterials | protein adsorption | unit cell process | wound healing | tissue remodeling | tissue regeneration | organ regeneration | prosthesis | biodegradable | bioreplaceable implants | BE.441 | 2.79 | 3.96 | HST.522

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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BE.441 Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Topics include methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. It also covers mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Other areas include tissue and organ regeneration; design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions; comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to

Subjects

medical implants | artificial organs | tissue engineering | matrix | biomaterials | protein adsorption | unit cell process | wound healing | tissue remodeling | tissue regeneration | organ regeneration | prosthesis | biodegradable | bioreplaceable implants | 2.79J | 3.96J | HST.522J | 2.79 | 3.96 | HST.522

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.14 Brain Structure and Its Origins (MIT)

Description

Outline of mammalian functional neuroanatomy, aided by studies of comparative neuroanatomy and evolution, and of brain development. Topics include early steps to a central nervous system, basic patterns of brain and spinal cord connections, regional development and differentiation, regeneration, motor and sensory pathways and structures, systems underlying motivations, innate action patterns, formation of habits, and various cognitive functions. Lab techniques reviewed. Optional brain dissections.

Subjects

CNS structures | development | plasticity | anatomy | tissue culture | embryogenesis | PNS anatomy and development | process outgrowth | synaptogenesis | growth factors | cell survival | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | comparative anatomy | CNS evolution | trigeminal system | retinotectal system | regeneration | neocortex anatomy | olfactory system | corpus striatum | brain transplants | limbic system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.342 Reading the Blueprint of Life: Transcription, Stem Cells and Differentiation (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will address how transcriptional regulators both prohibit and drive differentiation during the course of development. How does a stem cell know when to remain a stem cell and when to become a specific cell type? Are there global differences in the way the genome is read in multipotent and terminally differentiated cells? We will explore how stem cell pluripotency is preserved, how master regulators of cell-fate decisions execute developmental programs, and how chromatin regulators control undifferentiated versus differentiated states. Additionally, we will discuss how aberrant regulation of transcriptional regulators produces disorders such as developmental defects and cancer.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at

Subjects

blueprint of life | transcription | stem cells | differentiation | human tissues | tissue regeneration | human disease | RNA and protein expression patterns | transcriptional regulation | specialized gene expression programs | genome | multipotent | terminally differentiated | pluripotency | master regulators | chromatin regulators | developmental defects | cancer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Olympic Games: catalyst of urban change

Description

The Olympic Games have emerged as a significant catalyst of urban change and can act as a key instrument of urban policy for their host cities. This paper reviews the effect of the Games on the built environment of the various cities which have acted as hosts in the modern Olympic period (1896-1996) and assesses the preparations now being made for the Games in Sydney in the year 2000. The review indicates that the Games have been increasingly used as a trigger for a wide range of urban improvements, although there have been considerable variations in the scale of infrastructural investment and in the public-private sector mix.

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | post-Fordism | public expenditure | funding | financing | investment | modern olympics | Pierre de Coubertin | sustainability | Munich 1972 | Montreal 1976 | Moscow 1980 | Los Angeles 1984 | Seoul 1988 | Barcelona 1992 | Atlanta 1996 | Sydney 2000 | globalisation.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

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The political process of constructing a sustainable London Olympics sports development legacy

Description

This study attempts to develop a research agenda for understanding the process of constructing a sustainable Olympic sports development legacy. The research uses a social constructivist perspective to examine the link between the 2012 London Olympic Games and sustainable sports development. The first part of the paper provides justification for the study of sport policy processes using a constructivist lens. This is followed by a section which critically unpacks sustainable sports development drawing on Mosse's (1998) ideas of process-oriented research and Searle's conceptualisation of the construction of social reality. Searle's (1995) concepts of the assignment of function, collective intentionality, collective rules, and human capacity to cope with the environment are considered in r

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | collective intentionality | constructivism | International Olympic Committee | policy research | sustainable Olympic sports development legacy | sustainability | legacy | Olympic charter | DCMS | Sport England | health | nutrition | development | regeneration | environmental issues | environment | research.

License

Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights. Copyright Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. See the individual resource for usage rights.

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Mapping the Olympic growth machine

Description

Theories of growth machines and urban regimes have informed the study of urban political economy for more than three decades, but these theories remain focused on intra-urban processes. Using a case study of the bidding process and the planning of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, we explore the transnational dimensions of the urban growth machine and explore common aspects between the growth machine and regime theory literature and the literatures on the entrepreneurial city and transnational urban policy transfers. Through its evolving networks with other urban regimes, Vancouver's growth machine provides a ready forum in which local elites can acquire specialized knowledge on new urban entrepreneurial strategies elsewhere. Actors situated in different parts of the local growt

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | Vancouver 2010 | bidding process | event management | urbanisation | urban environment | architecture | urban development | politics | planning | regeneration | city marketing.

License

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A brief historical review of Olympic urbanization

Description

Recent decades have seen an increased interest from the world's major cities to bid for international sporting events and to use them as agents for urban transformation. In this paper the particular focus is that of urban development driven by the preparation for the Olympic Summer Games. Starting with Coubertin's utopian concept for the creation of a 'modern Olympia', Olympic urbanization has been developing for over a century. The result is that in various cities with often diverse urban patterns and cultures, the Games have left very different impacts on the local environment. This paper outlines the history and changes in urbanization within those cities that have acted as hosts during the modern Olympic period (1896-2012). It also discusses key factors in connection with the creat

Subjects

urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | legacy | Olympic history | investment | funding | public expenditure | finance | HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality.

License

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Post-event Outcomes and the Post-modern Turn: The Olympics and Urban Transformations

Description

The Olympics are analysed from an urban perspective as an event that has an impact on cities beyond sport. The focus of the paper is on post-event outcomes and particularly on Olympic-related facilities and how they are used once the Olympics are over. The 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics serves as the primary illustration of the processes described. The transformation of the urban order is discussed in terms of the post-modern turn and it is shown how the Olympics are affected by and contributes to the support of the shift toward leisure consumption as a dominant theme in the new urban symbolic economy. Issues such as place marketing, urban restructuring, urban regionalization, surveillance, and social exclusion are also related to post-Olympic outcomes.

Subjects

HLST | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | HLSTOER | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality | urban environment | built environment | urban design | architecture | development | regeneration | redevelopment | host city | Olympic park | Olympic Village | Olympic Stadium | Olympic facilities | public expenditure | funding | financing | investment | globalisation | cities | legacy | sustainability | impact | host city | leisure consumer | social exclusion.

License

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Working in Groups - for Regional Regeneration section 1

Description

This JISC funded project has re-used and re-purposed learning content from external and internal sources to develop and pilot a level 4 module “Working in Groups” for multi-professional teams working in the field of Regional Regeneration. Permissions received from all external sources.

Subjects

studying online | ukoer | working in groups | group working | working groups | groups versus teams | group | team | groups vs teams | regional regeneration | non-verbal communication | action learning sets | group work reflection | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Working in Groups - for Regional Regeneration section 2

Description

This JISC funded project has re-used and re-purposed learning content from external and internal sources to develop and pilot a level 4 module “Working in Groups” for multi-professional teams working in the field of Regional Regeneration. Permissions received from all external sources.

Subjects

ukoer | working in groups | group working | working groups | differences between groups and teams | group formation and planning | group | team | groups vs teams | benefits of group work | stages of group development | regional regeneration | non-verbal communication | action learning sets | legal actions | group work reflection | techniques to improve group output | equality and diversity | participation and involvement | team resources | resource needs of a group | issues of inclusion and exclusion with group work | studying online | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Working in Groups - for Regional Regeneration section 3

Description

This JISC funded project has re-used and re-purposed learning content from external and internal sources to develop and pilot a level 4 module “Working in Groups” for multi-professional teams working in the field of Regional Regeneration. Permissions received from all external sources.

Subjects

working in groups | group working | working groups | group dynamics and behaviour | appreciative enquiry | transactional analysis | groups versus teams | group | team | groups vs teams | regional regeneration | non-verbal communication | action learning sets | group work reflection | studying online | ukoer | Social studies | Education | X000 | L000 | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Working in Groups - for Regional Regeneration section 4

Description

This JISC funded project has re-used and re-purposed learning content from external and internal sources to develop and pilot a level 4 module “Working in Groups” for multi-professional teams working in the field of Regional Regeneration. Permissions received from all external sources.

Subjects

ukoer | working in groups | group working | working groups | communicating effectively in groups | effective communication | data sharing | sharing intelligence | giving briefings | giving presentations | planning a presentation | conducting meetings | meetings | roles people play in meetings | managing meetings | meeting minutes | minute takers | groups and teams | regional regeneration | non-verbal communication | action learning sets | group work reflection | studying online | Social studies | Education | X000 | L000 | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The North Foreshore

Description

This is an Aerial view of the north foreshore, South Shields, c1940s Reference: 3535/208/5 This photograph is part of a set that has been created to celebrate the opening of South Tyneside Council?s new leisure centre, Haven Point, on 28 October. It focuses in particular on life along the foreshore at South Shields during the 1950s but also includes a few images from further down the coast. South Shields has long been a popular seaside resort and also has a proud industrial heritage. Times have changed, though, and many of the old industries such as shipbuilding and coal mining have disappeared. Rather than stand still and accept this change in fortunes, South Tyneside Council is pressing ahead with an ambitious vision to transform the Foreshore, Town Centre and Riverside areas into vibrant destinations. Haven Point is a key part of this change. Tyne & Wear Archives and South Tyneside Local Studies Library have a vital role to play in this. As South Shields is regenerated and forever changed the Archives and Local Studies serve as its memory. We keep alive a window into the town?s past, preserving the history of people, places and industries that no longer exist. South Shields must look forward but its sense of direction will be lost if it forgets where it came from. These images, together with a fantastic selection from South Tyneside Local Studies Library, can be seen in a digital exhibition at Haven Point. You can also see images from the Local Studies Library online at www.southtynesideimages.org.uk/. A Blog on this collection of images can be read here (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

summer | seaside | holiday | beach | bay | sand | sea | leisure | northeast | aerialphotographs | blackandwhitephotograph | c1940s | northforeshore | southshields | opening | southtynesidecouncil | newleisurecentre | havenpoint | 28october | 1950s | socialheritage | abstract | seasideresort | industrial | oldindustries | change | transformation | towncentre | riverside | land | border | vegetation | water | southshieldsforeshorepreservingthememories | buildings | wall | roof | chimney | road | path | people | lawn | block | vehicle | tranquility | striking | unusual | regeneration | archival

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums | FlickR

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Trow Rocks

Description

This is a view of the beach from Trow Rocks, South Shields, c1950s. Reference: 3535/206/27 This photograph is part of a set that has been created to celebrate the opening of South Tyneside Council?s new leisure centre, Haven Point, on 28 October. It focuses in particular on life along the foreshore at South Shields during the 1950s but also includes a few images from further down the coast. South Shields has long been a popular seaside resort and also has a proud industrial heritage. Times have changed, though, and many of the old industries such as shipbuilding and coal mining have disappeared. Rather than stand still and accept this change in fortunes, South Tyneside Council is pressing ahead with an ambitious vision to transform the Foreshore, Town Centre and Riverside areas into vibrant destinations. Haven Point is a key part of this change. Tyne & Wear Archives and South Tyneside Local Studies Library have a vital role to play in this. As South Shields is regenerated and forever changed the Archives and Local Studies serve as its memory. We keep alive a window into the town?s past, preserving the history of people, places and industries that no longer exist. South Shields must look forward but its sense of direction will be lost if it forgets where it came from. These images, together with a fantastic selection from South Tyneside Local Studies Library, can be seen in a digital exhibition at Haven Point. You can also see images from the Local Studies Library online at www.southtynesideimages.org.uk/. A Blog on this collection of images can be read here (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

summer | seaside | holiday | beach | bay | sand | sea | leisure | coast | northeast | southshieldsforeshorepreservingthememories | southshields | c1950s | trowrocks | landscape | water | view | southtynesidecouncil | newleisurecentre | opening | havenpoint | 28october | socialheritage | dailylife | blackandwhitephotograph | foreshore | coastal | seasideresort | industry | industrial | shipbuilding | coalmining | towncentre | riverside | change | transformation | southtynesidelocalstudieslibrary | tyneweararchives | regeneration | archives | localstudies | digitalimage | gathering | people | land | vegetation | sky | grass | soil | cliff | buildings | row | tent | clothes | shirt | trousers | striking | interesting | grain | blur

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums | FlickR

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Talk About the North Franco Bianchini

Description

Cities on the Edge? Issues in culture-led urban regeneration and the cultural politics of geographical peripherality - Liverpool, Marseille and Naples

Subjects

ukoer | talk about the north | urban regeneration | cultural politics | Sociology | Anthropology | Politics | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Value of Learning for Personal Development

Description

In this lesson, we will examine the impact of learning on personal development and discuss the contribution of learning to economic growth and to community regeneration.

Subjects

communities of practice | community regeneration | inclusion | personal development | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

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Attribution

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