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21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT) 21G.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons. The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | globalization | society | society | geography | geography | america | america | europe | europe | asia | asia | africa | africa | third worrld | third worrld | development | development | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | religion | religion | politics | politics | youth | youth | developing nation | developing nation | first world | first world | cosmopolitan culture | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | global youth culture | religious movements | religious movements | social movements | social movements | political movements | political movements | pop | pop | popular music | popular music | political cartoons | political cartoons | Japan | Japan | popular culture | popular culture | world hip-hop | world hip-hop | rap | rap | media power | media power | consumer activism | consumer activism | third world | third world | 21F.035 | 21F.035 | 21F.037 | 21F.037

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Old English in Context Lecture 3 - Religion and Magic

Description

Lecture 3 in a series on placing Old English in Context, Religion and magic. Delivered by Dr S D Lee, Faculty of English, University of Oxford - 31/1/08. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | england | medieval | old english | religion | english | magic | anglo-saxon | #greatwriters | england | medieval | old english | religion | english | magic | anglo-saxon | 2008-01-31

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Decisions and Turkish Code Reforms Pertaining to the Headscarf on Islamist Women in Turkey: Enabling Emancipation or Legitimizing Discrimination?

Description

Sarah Ficher, (American University), gives a talk for the Legal Reform and Political Change Affecting Women in the MENA Region held on Tuesday 12 June, 2012 in St Antony's College. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Turkey | Arab Spring | family | gender | legal reform | religion | middle east | politics | law | north africa | women | Turkey | Arab Spring | family | gender | legal reform | religion | middle east | politics | law | north africa | women

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21F.035 Topics in Culture and Globalization (MIT)

Description

The concept of globalization fosters the understanding of the interconnectedness of cultures and societies geographically wide apart; America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Subject scans existing debates over globalization around the world. This course explores how globalization impacts everyday life in the First and Third World; how globalization leads to a common cosmopolitan culture; the emergence of a global youth culture; and religious, social, and political movements that challenge globalization. Materials examined include pop music, advertisements, film posters, and political cartoons.

Subjects

globalization; society; geography; america; europe; asia; africa; third worrld; development; contemporary culture; religion; politics; youth; developing nation | globalization | society | geography | america | europe | asia | africa | third worrld | development | contemporary culture | religion | politics | youth | developing nation | first world | cosmopolitan culture | global youth culture | religious movements | social movements | political movements | pop | popular music | political cartoons | Japan | popular culture | world hip-hop | rap | media power | consumer activism | third world

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Enlightenment The Enlightenment

Description

The free course will examine the Enlightenment. To help understand the nature and scale of the cultural changes of the time, we offer a 'map' of the conceptual territory and the intellectual and cultural climate. We will examine the impact of Enlightenment on a variety of areas including science, religion, the classics, art and nature. Finally, we will examine the forces of change which led from Enlightenment to Romanticism. First published on Mon, 08 Feb 2016 as The Enlightenment. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 The free course will examine the Enlightenment. To help understand the nature and scale of the cultural changes of the time, we offer a 'map' of the conceptual territory and the intellectual and cultural climate. We will examine the impact of Enlightenment on a variety of areas including science, religion, the classics, art and nature. Finally, we will examine the forces of change which led from Enlightenment to Romanticism. First published on Mon, 08 Feb 2016 as The Enlightenment. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

History of Art | History of Art | art | art | enlightenment | enlightenment | Romanticism | Romanticism | religion | religion | classics | classics | A207_1 | A207_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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21G.711 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition (MIT) 21G.711 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition (MIT)

Description

En este curso el estudiante perfeccionará su comunicación oral y escrita mediante el estudio y la discusión de temas relacionados al impacto social y cultural de la ciencia y la tecnología en ciertas sociedades hispanas. Algunos de los temas que se considerarán son los efectos de los cambios tecnológicos en la estructura familiar y comunitaria, en las relaciones entre los sexos, en la identidad personal y cultural, en el mundo natural y en los sistemas de valores, la religión, la educación y el trabajo. También se examinarán y compararán diversas actitudes hacia la innovación tecnológica y científica tal como se expresan en los medios de comunicación, los d En este curso el estudiante perfeccionará su comunicación oral y escrita mediante el estudio y la discusión de temas relacionados al impacto social y cultural de la ciencia y la tecnología en ciertas sociedades hispanas. Algunos de los temas que se considerarán son los efectos de los cambios tecnológicos en la estructura familiar y comunitaria, en las relaciones entre los sexos, en la identidad personal y cultural, en el mundo natural y en los sistemas de valores, la religión, la educación y el trabajo. También se examinarán y compararán diversas actitudes hacia la innovación tecnológica y científica tal como se expresan en los medios de comunicación, los d

Subjects

spanish | spanish | foreign language | foreign language | conversation | conversation | writing | writing | literature | literature | culture | culture | technological change | technological change | society | society | hispanic | hispanic | gender relations | gender relations | identity | identity | religion education | religion education | community | community | media | media | ethics | ethics | latin america | latin america | western europe | western europe | spain | spain | central america | central america | south america | south america

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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How Universal is Liberalism?

Description

Professor Ronald Dworkin, New York University, delivers the 2012 Ralf Dahrendorf Memorial Lecture, with response from Professor Sir Adam Roberts, President of the British Academy. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

liberal | religion | freedom | free | society | speech | politics | law | religious | liberal | religion | freedom | free | society | speech | politics | law | religious | 2012-04-27

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Is Nothing Sacred? Free Speech and Religion

Description

Professor A C Grayling delivers the 2011 Ralf Dahrendorf Memorial Lecture, with responses by Charles Moore and Dr. Usama Hasan. Filmed on 10 June 2011. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

christian | religion | freedom | free | society | speech | expression | respect | politics | law | religious | conflict | islam | christian | religion | freedom | free | society | speech | expression | respect | politics | law | religious | conflict | islam | 2011-06-10

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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1.3 Science from Aristotle to Galileo

Description

Part 1.3. Describes briefly the Aristotelian view of the universe; the basis for natural science in Europe until the 15th century and its conflict Galileo's theories. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

science | philosophy | religion | aristotle | galileo | astronomy | science | philosophy | religion | aristotle | galileo | astronomy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Why study icons? Why study icons?

Description

Icons – religious images from the eastern Churches – are far more than religious images as seen in western churches: they enable an encounter between the observer and the mystery. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them. Icons – religious images from the eastern Churches – are far more than religious images as seen in western churches: they enable an encounter between the observer and the mystery. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | Orthodoxy | Orthodoxy | ukoer | ukoer | Christianity | Christianity | God | God | Jesus | Jesus | church | church | religion | religion | theology | theology | Eastern | Eastern | Greek | Greek

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21L.001 Foundations of Western Culture I: Homer to Dante (MIT) 21L.001 Foundations of Western Culture I: Homer to Dante (MIT)

Description

This subject introduces the student to some of the literary, philosophical and religious texts which became major sources of assumption about the nature of the universe and mankind's place within it and which continue to underlie the characteristically Western sense of things to this day. In particular, the subject will study closely texts from two broad ranges of texts, those of ancient Greece and some major texts of the Judeo-Christian tradition, which rivals the tradition of the ancient world and in many ways contests with it.In our discussions we will also examine the claims made in behalf of our texts that they are classics and we will explore some of the historical, literary, intellectual, and ethical significance that the question "what is a classic?" has had at different This subject introduces the student to some of the literary, philosophical and religious texts which became major sources of assumption about the nature of the universe and mankind's place within it and which continue to underlie the characteristically Western sense of things to this day. In particular, the subject will study closely texts from two broad ranges of texts, those of ancient Greece and some major texts of the Judeo-Christian tradition, which rivals the tradition of the ancient world and in many ways contests with it.In our discussions we will also examine the claims made in behalf of our texts that they are classics and we will explore some of the historical, literary, intellectual, and ethical significance that the question "what is a classic?" has had at different

Subjects

western | western | culture | culture | literature | literature | judeo-christian | judeo-christian | philosophy | philosophy | religion | religion | greece | greece | classic | classic | history | history | civilization | civilization | Homer | Homer | Aeschylus | Aeschylus | Sophocles | Sophocles | Euripides | Euripides | Thucydides | Thucydides | Plato | Plato | Aristotle | Aristotle | Saint Augustine | Saint Augustine | Dante | Dante | bible | bible | classics | classics | western civilization | western civilization | Rome | Rome

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.4 From Galileo to Descartes

Description

Part 1.4. Outlines Galileo's revolutionary theories of astronomy and mechanical science and introduces Descartes' (the father of modern philosophy) ideas of philosophical scepticism. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

scepticism | descartes | meditations | philosophy | religion | aristotle | galileo | skepticism | astronomy | scepticism | descartes | meditations | philosophy | religion | aristotle | galileo | skepticism | astronomy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.575J Women in South Asia from 1800 to Present (MIT) 21H.575J Women in South Asia from 1800 to Present (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce and help students understand the changes and continuities in the lives of women in South Asia from a historical perspective. Using gender as a lens of examining the past, we will examine how politics of race, class, caste and religion affected and continue to impact women in South Asian countries, primarily in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. We will reflect upon current debates within South Asian women's history in order to examine some of the issues and problems that arise in re-writing the past from a gendered perspective and these are found in primary documents, secondary readings, films, newspaper articles, and the Internet. This course is designed to introduce and help students understand the changes and continuities in the lives of women in South Asia from a historical perspective. Using gender as a lens of examining the past, we will examine how politics of race, class, caste and religion affected and continue to impact women in South Asian countries, primarily in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. We will reflect upon current debates within South Asian women's history in order to examine some of the issues and problems that arise in re-writing the past from a gendered perspective and these are found in primary documents, secondary readings, films, newspaper articles, and the Internet.

Subjects

21H.575 | 21H.575 | WGS.459 | WGS.459 | mother | mother | daughter | daughter | in-law | in-law | wive | wive | courtesan | courtesan | concubine | concubine | divinities | divinities | devotee | devotee | social reform | social reform | india | india | education | education | religion | religion | gender | gender | law | law | colonial india | colonial india | british empire | british empire | good wife | good wife | harem | harem | political participation | political participation | women's work | women's work | empower | empower | birth control | birth control | gandhi | gandhi | public health | public health | activism | activism | partition | partition | dowry | dowry | rape | rape | sati | sati | civil code | civil code | religious fundamentalism | religious fundamentalism | sexualty | sexualty | popular culture | popular culture | globalization | globalization | feminism | feminism | south asian women | south asian women

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.1 Recap of General Philosophy Lecture 1

Description

Part 2.1. A brief recap on the first lecture describing how Aristotle's view of the universe, dominant throughout the middle ages in Europe, came to be gradually phased out by a modern, mechanistic view of the universe. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

christianity | descartes | society | science | philosophy | religion | renaissance | aristotle | mathematics | astronomy | christianity | descartes | society | science | philosophy | religion | renaissance | aristotle | mathematics | astronomy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Why study Orthodox Christianity? Why study Orthodox Christianity?

Description

Most English-speakers, when they think of Christianity, think only of its Latin, western forms, be they Catholic or Protestant. But this is only half the story: there are also all the churches of the East, often collectively referred to as ‘the Orthodox’. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them. Most English-speakers, when they think of Christianity, think only of its Latin, western forms, be they Catholic or Protestant. But this is only half the story: there are also all the churches of the East, often collectively referred to as ‘the Orthodox’. In this video, Mary Cunningham, an expert on Orthodoxy, introduces them.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | Orthodoxy | Orthodoxy | Christianity | Christianity | God | God | Jesus | Jesus | church | church | religion | religion | theology | theology | belief | belief | Greek | Greek

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21H.522 Japan in the Age of the Samurai: History and Film (MIT) 21H.522 Japan in the Age of the Samurai: History and Film (MIT)

Description

This course covers medieval Japanese society and culture from the twelfth to the nineteenth centuries, when political power rested largely in the hands of feudal warriors. Topics include religion (especially Zen Buddhism); changing concepts of "the way of the warrior;" women under feudalism; popular culture; and protest and rebellion. Presentations include weekly feature films. Assigned readings include many literary writings in translation. This course covers medieval Japanese society and culture from the twelfth to the nineteenth centuries, when political power rested largely in the hands of feudal warriors. Topics include religion (especially Zen Buddhism); changing concepts of "the way of the warrior;" women under feudalism; popular culture; and protest and rebellion. Presentations include weekly feature films. Assigned readings include many literary writings in translation.

Subjects

medieval japan | medieval japan | feudal japan | feudal japan | japanese history | japanese history | japanese film | japanese film | warring states period | warring states period | ieyasu tokugawa | ieyasu tokugawa | ukiyo-e | ukiyo-e | women in japan | women in japan | samurai | samurai | bushido | bushido | haiku | haiku | noh | noh | bunraku | bunraku | zen | zen | buddhism | buddhism | shinto | shinto | christianity in japan | christianity in japan | seppuku | seppuku | akira kurosawa | akira kurosawa | japanese superstitions | japanese superstitions | japanese religions | japanese religions | japanese society | japanese society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Why study systematic theology? : with Karen Kilby in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin Why study systematic theology? : with Karen Kilby in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin

Description

In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr Karen Kilby, an expert in systematic theology, explains what is meant by ‘systematics’ within the field of theology, and how it emerges out of the questions that believers ask in seeking to make sense of their faith. In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr Karen Kilby, an expert in systematic theology, explains what is meant by ‘systematics’ within the field of theology, and how it emerges out of the questions that believers ask in seeking to make sense of their faith.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | meaning | meaning | religion | religion | questions | questions | faith | faith | belief | belief | reason | reason | systematics | systematics

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Our Religious Traditions in a long Historical Perspective

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | humanitas | history | interfaith | religion | humanitas | history

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Possibility of Religious-Secular Ethical Engagement Debate 1: Abortion

Description

The Possibility of Religious-Secular Ethical Engagement: Abortion. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

uehiro | philosophy | abortion | religion | ethics | feminism | morality | uehiro | philosophy | abortion | religion | ethics | feminism | morality

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Two Concepts of Sharia?

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | sharia | humanitas | islam | interfaith | religion | sharia | humanitas | islam

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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: Where do we find ourselves now?

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | humanitas | liberalism | interfaith | religion | humanitas | liberalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Resisting Apologetics: What can we learn from Ibn Rushd and our contemporaries?

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | humanitas | apologetics | interfaith | religion | humanitas | apologetics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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How to protect your newborn from neonatal death: spirits and infant feeding practices in the Gambia

Description

A seminar for the Fertility and Reproduction Group by Sarah O'Neill of the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp (10 November 2014) Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

anthropology | society | infant | childbirth | religion | Ghana | Africa | ritual | anthropology | society | infant | childbirth | religion | Ghana | Africa | ritual | 2014-11-10

License

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21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT) 21H.306 The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300 (MIT)

Description

This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century. This course surveys the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1350. A number of topics are incorporated into the broad chronological sweep of the course, including: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the rise of a distinct northern culture and the Carolingian Renaissance; the emergence of feudalism and the breakdown of political order; contact with the Byzantine and Islamic East and the Crusading movement; the quality of religious life; the vitality of the high medieval economy and culture; and the catastrophes of the fourteenth century.

Subjects

medieval | medieval | ancient history | ancient history | europe | europe | culture | culture | politics | politics | mediterranean | mediterranean | germanic | germanic | byzantine | byzantine | carolingian renaissance | carolingian renaissance | islamic | islamic | crusades | crusades | religion | religion | economics | economics | feudalism | feudalism | barbarian | barbarian | charlemagne | charlemagne | england | england | ottonian | ottonian | empire | empire | rome | rome | gothic | gothic | monarchy | monarchy | Western Europe | Western Europe | Germanic conquest | Germanic conquest | Mediterranean civilization | Mediterranean civilization | social development | social development | cultural development | cultural development | political development | political development | religious life | religious life | women | women | high medieval economy | high medieval economy | high medieval culture | high medieval culture | twelfth century | twelfth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT) 21H.580 From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction. This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction.

Subjects

history | history | silk road | silk road | China | China | Russia | Russia | Central Eurasia | Central Eurasia | mongolia | mongolia | turkey | turkey | religion | religion | trade | trade | war | war | tradition | tradition | culture | culture | soviet union | soviet union | islam | islam | buddhism | buddhism | christianity | christianity | confucianism | confucianism | marco polo | marco polo | rabban sauma | rabban sauma | film | film | travelogue | travelogue | music | music | empire | empire | nomad | nomad | conquest | conquest

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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