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The use of Ground Penetrating Radar to identify output differences in cremated remains burials, when compared to other stages of decomposition

Description

buried remains, a suitable search and recovery strategy needs to be employed; allowing forensic potential to be maximised and enabling reconstruction to take place. GPR has been perceived as the standard geophysical technique used in the search and recovery of human remains, however too little is currently known about the limitations of the method when considering different conditions of buried remains, such as varied degrees of burning. Seven grave variables were created; fresh, dry, second degree, fourth degree, lab cremated, in-situ cremated and empty backfilled. All at a depth of 25 cm and measuring 60cm2 in a grid of 10m by 3m. GPR surveys using TerraSIRch SIR system 3000 were carried out at 7-21 day intervals, using a 400mHz antenna with transverse intervals. Sample identification is

Subjects

Ground Penetrating Radar | GPR | Cremated remains | Burial detection | Forensic archaeology | Search | thesis | undergraduate | Physical sciences | F000

License

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

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A view of the Roman Remains and People?s Park, around 1905

Description

Much of the site of Arbeia that we see today would have been covered with streets and houses during the First World War. However a small section in the middle of the fort site, containing the most extensive ruins, was open to the public as a park for recreation and to study the Roman Remains. The park was created in 1880 after excavations were carried out prior to building works and public interest in the Roman ruins was very high. It was then decided to keep 0.45 hectares of the site uncovered and the Roman Remains and People?s Park was born. Across the Southern portion of the site was Baring Street School, part of which still stands today and is part of the museum complex and in the North West corner of the site stood the lodge or the park keeper?s house. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email claire.ross@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

worldwarone | worlife1914 | twamvenues | romanruins | peoplespark | remains | landscape | view | oldestpark | alexdrysdale | southshields | site | arbeia | streets | houses | firstworldwar | fortsite | recreation | study | 1880 | publicaccess | studies | excavations | colourphotograph | buildingworks | baringstreetschool | museumcomplex | northwestcorner | lodge | parkkeepershouse | socialheritage | abstract | unusual | intriguing | industry | structure | construction | building | sky | cloud | chimney | brick | wall | roof | stone | window | glass | curtain | vegetation | bench | chair | seat | platform | grass | shrub | flowers | female | dress | hat | path | heritage | history | historical | remnants | hectares | uncovered | 1905

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums | FlickR

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The Remains of HMS Kelly

Description

This photograph shows the remains of the H.M.S. Kelly arriving on the River Tyne following its severe Torpedo incident Reference: 2931-Unlisted This image is taken from an album produced by the world famous shipbuilding and engineering firm of Hawthorn Leslie. The album gives us a fascinating glimpse of life at the company's shipyard at Hebburn from the late 1930s to the 1960s. There are remarkable images of the men at work in the yard and a poignant series showing the terrible damage caused during the Second World War to HMS Kelly, one of Hawthorn Leslie's best loved ships. This particular collection of images follows the Birth and ultimate Death of a ship. From the craft and pride in its production and the joy in its performance, to the devastation and price of its destruction. A blog about this fascinating collection can been viewed here on the Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums website. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

ruin | wreck | ship | warship | maritimeheritage | naval | blackandwhitephotograph | hawthornlesliehebburnontyne | hmskelly | vessel | remains | rivertyne | torpedoincident | shipbuilding | engineering | hawthornleslie | hebburn | shipyard | late1930s1960s | crew | workers | damage | secondworldwar | ww2 | death | birth | production | industrial | industry | destruction | digitalimage | fascinating | unusual | smoke | sky | grain | mark | mast | rope | cylinder | chimney | deck | cabin | crane | buildings | bank | land | water | channel | shadow | daylight | parts | metal | steel | bolt | plate | panel | devastation | surreal

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums | FlickR

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