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8.901 Astrophysics I (MIT) 8.901 Astrophysics I (MIT)

Description

This course provides a graduate-level introduction to stellar astrophysics. It covers a variety of topics, ranging from stellar structure and evolution to galactic dynamics and dark matter. This course provides a graduate-level introduction to stellar astrophysics. It covers a variety of topics, ranging from stellar structure and evolution to galactic dynamics and dark matter.

Subjects

Historical astronomy | Historical astronomy | astronomical instrumentation | astronomical instrumentation | Stars: spectra | Stars: spectra | classification | classification | stellar structure equations | stellar structure equations | stellar evolution | stellar evolution | stellar oscillations | stellar oscillations | degenerate and collapsed stars | degenerate and collapsed stars | radio pulsars | radio pulsars | interacting binary systems | interacting binary systems | accretion disks | accretion disks | x-ray sources | x-ray sources | gravitational lenses | gravitational lenses | dark matter | dark matter | interstellar medium: HII regions | interstellar medium: HII regions | supernova remnants | supernova remnants | molecular clouds | molecular clouds | dust | dust | radiative transfer | radiative transfer | Jeans' mass | Jeans' mass | star formation | star formation | high-energy astrophysics | high-energy astrophysics | Compton scattering | Compton scattering | bremsstrahlung | bremsstrahlung | synchrotron radiation | synchrotron radiation | cosmic rays | cosmic rays | Galactic stellar distributions | Galactic stellar distributions | Oort constants | Oort constants | Oort limit | Oort limit | globular clusters. | globular clusters. | globular clusters | globular clusters

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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A view of the Roman Remains and People?s Park, around 1905

Description

Much of the site of Arbeia that we see today would have been covered with streets and houses during the First World War. However a small section in the middle of the fort site, containing the most extensive ruins, was open to the public as a park for recreation and to study the Roman Remains. The park was created in 1880 after excavations were carried out prior to building works and public interest in the Roman ruins was very high. It was then decided to keep 0.45 hectares of the site uncovered and the Roman Remains and People?s Park was born. Across the Southern portion of the site was Baring Street School, part of which still stands today and is part of the museum complex and in the North West corner of the site stood the lodge or the park keeper?s house. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email claire.ross@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

worldwarone | worlife1914 | twamvenues | romanruins | peoplespark | remains | landscape | view | oldestpark | alexdrysdale | southshields | site | arbeia | streets | houses | firstworldwar | fortsite | recreation | study | 1880 | publicaccess | studies | excavations | colourphotograph | buildingworks | baringstreetschool | museumcomplex | northwestcorner | lodge | parkkeepershouse | socialheritage | abstract | unusual | intriguing | industry | structure | construction | building | sky | cloud | chimney | brick | wall | roof | stone | window | glass | curtain | vegetation | bench | chair | seat | platform | grass | shrub | flowers | female | dress | hat | path | heritage | history | historical | remnants | hectares | uncovered | 1905

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums | FlickR

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Remnants of crazes on a polystyrene fracture surface

Description

The fracture surfaces are generally very sharp and angular, indicating fast, brittle fracture with little ductile tearing. The flat region with a fine fibrous surface is the remnant of a craze which has formed ahead of the crack, and then failed, leaving a flat region.

Subjects

brittle | craze | craze remnants | fracture | polymer | polystyrene (ps) | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

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Remnants of crazes on a polycarbonate fracture surface

Description

The fracture surface shows fibrils of oriented polymer which are the remnants of crazes. Crazes are both a precursor to cracking and a toughening mechanism in stressed polymers. They only form when a certain critical tensile stress has been attained and form perpendicular to the largest tensile principal stress. They are very fine crack-like projections from the fracture surface but are bridged by even finer material, giving approximately 50% voids. It is these fibrils which interfere with light in an otherwise transparent polymer to make the crazing visible as a whitening of the strained material. It is the remnants of these fibrils which are visible on this fracture surface.

Subjects

craze | craze remnants | fibril | fracture | polycarbonate (pc) | polymer | doitpoms | university of cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

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8.901 Astrophysics I (MIT)

Description

This course provides a graduate-level introduction to stellar astrophysics. It covers a variety of topics, ranging from stellar structure and evolution to galactic dynamics and dark matter.

Subjects

Historical astronomy | astronomical instrumentation | Stars: spectra | classification | stellar structure equations | stellar evolution | stellar oscillations | degenerate and collapsed stars | radio pulsars | interacting binary systems | accretion disks | x-ray sources | gravitational lenses | dark matter | interstellar medium: HII regions | supernova remnants | molecular clouds | dust | radiative transfer | Jeans' mass | star formation | high-energy astrophysics | Compton scattering | bremsstrahlung | synchrotron radiation | cosmic rays | Galactic stellar distributions | Oort constants | Oort limit | globular clusters. | globular clusters

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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Remnants of crazes on a polystyrene fracture surface

Description

The fracture surfaces are generally very sharp and angular, indicating fast, brittle fracture with little ductile tearing. The flat region with a fine fibrous surface is the remnant of a craze which has formed ahead of the crack, and then failed, leaving a flat region.

Subjects

brittle | craze | craze remnants | fracture | polymer | polystyrene (PS) | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://core.materials.ac.uk/rss/doitpoms_images.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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Remnants of crazes on a polycarbonate fracture surface

Description

The fracture surface shows fibrils of oriented polymer which are the remnants of crazes. Crazes are both a precursor to cracking and a toughening mechanism in stressed polymers. They only form when a certain critical tensile stress has been attained and form perpendicular to the largest tensile principal stress. They are very fine crack-like projections from the fracture surface but are bridged by even finer material, giving approximately 50% voids. It is these fibrils which interfere with light in an otherwise transparent polymer to make the crazing visible as a whitening of the strained material. It is the remnants of these fibrils which are visible on this fracture surface.

Subjects

craze | craze remnants | fibril | fracture | polycarbonate (PC) | polymer | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | micrograph | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://core.materials.ac.uk/rss/doitpoms_images.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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