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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT) STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives. This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | Social | study | study | science | science | technology | technology | interdisciplinary field | interdisciplinary field | social practice | social practice | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | sociology | sociology | scientific institutions | scientific institutions | knowledge | knowledge | anthropology | anthropology | feminism | feminism | critical race theory | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | post-colonial studies | queer theory | queer theory | human culture | human culture | politics | politics | theories | theories | methods | methods | reproduction | reproduction | social reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT) STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives. This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | Social | study | study | science | science | technology | technology | interdisciplinary field | interdisciplinary field | social practice | social practice | history | history | philosophy | philosophy | sociology | sociology | scientific institutions | scientific institutions | knowledge | knowledge | anthropology | anthropology | feminism | feminism | critical race theory | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | post-colonial studies | queer theory | queer theory | human culture | human culture | politics | politics | theories | theories | methods | methods | reproduction | reproduction | social reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | study | science | technology | interdisciplinary field | social practice | history | philosophy | sociology | scientific institutions | knowledge | anthropology | feminism | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | queer theory | human culture | politics | theories | methods | reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT) HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give the student a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of the menstrual cycle, fertilization, implantation, ovum growth development, differentiation and associated abnormalities. Disorders of fetal development including the principles of teratology and the mechanism of normal and abnormal parturition will be covered as well as the pathophysiology of the breast and disorders of lactation. Fetal asphyxia and its consequences will be reviewed with emphasis on the technology currently available for its detection. In addition the conclusion of the reproductive cycle, menopause, and the use of hormonal replacement will be covered. This course is designed to give the student a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of the menstrual cycle, fertilization, implantation, ovum growth development, differentiation and associated abnormalities. Disorders of fetal development including the principles of teratology and the mechanism of normal and abnormal parturition will be covered as well as the pathophysiology of the breast and disorders of lactation. Fetal asphyxia and its consequences will be reviewed with emphasis on the technology currently available for its detection. In addition the conclusion of the reproductive cycle, menopause, and the use of hormonal replacement will be covered.

Subjects

clinical case | clinical case | physiology | physiology | endocrinology | endocrinology | pathology | pathology | human reproduction | human reproduction | quantitative analysis | quantitative analysis | reproductive technology | reproductive technology | reproduction | reproduction | prenatal diagnosis | prenatal diagnosis | in vitro fertilization | in vitro fertilization | abortion | abortion | menopause | menopause | contraception | contraception | reproductive biology | reproductive biology | menstrual cycle | menstrual cycle | fertility | fertility | impotence | impotence | anatomy | anatomy | sexual differentiation | sexual differentiation | sex | sex | pregnancy | pregnancy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT) HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT)

Description

Lectures, laboratory sessions, and clinical case discussions designed to provide the student with a clear understanding of the physiology, endocrinology, and pathology of human reproduction. Emphasis is on quantitative analytic techniques and the role of technology in reproductive science. The course also involves the student in the wider aspects of reproduction, such as prenatal diagnosis, in vitro fertilization, abortion, menopause, and contraception. Lectures, laboratory sessions, and clinical case discussions designed to provide the student with a clear understanding of the physiology, endocrinology, and pathology of human reproduction. Emphasis is on quantitative analytic techniques and the role of technology in reproductive science. The course also involves the student in the wider aspects of reproduction, such as prenatal diagnosis, in vitro fertilization, abortion, menopause, and contraception.

Subjects

clinical case | clinical case | physiology | physiology | endocrinology | endocrinology | pathology | pathology | human reproduction | human reproduction | quantitative analysis | quantitative analysis | reproductive technology | reproductive technology | reproduction | reproduction | prenatal diagnosis | prenatal diagnosis | in vitro fertilization | in vitro fertilization | abortion | abortion | menopause | menopause | contraception | contraception

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | study | science | technology | interdisciplinary field | social practice | history | philosophy | sociology | scientific institutions | knowledge | anthropology | feminism | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | queer theory | human culture | politics | theories | methods | reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.350 Social Study of Science and Technology (MIT)

Description

This course surveys canonical and recent theories and methods in science studies. We will organize our discussions around the concept of "reproduction," referring variously to: Scientific reproduction (how results are replicated in lab, field, disciplinary contexts) Social reproduction (how social knowledge and relations are regenerated over time) Biological reproduction (how organic substance is managed in the genetic age) Electronic reproduction (how information is reassembled in techniques of transcription, simulation, computation). Examining intersections and disruptions of these genres of reproduction, we seek to map relations among our social, biological, and electronic lives.

Subjects

Social | study | science | technology | interdisciplinary field | social practice | history | philosophy | sociology | scientific institutions | knowledge | anthropology | feminism | critical race theory | post-colonial studies | queer theory | human culture | politics | theories | methods | reproduction | social reproduction | biological reproduction | electronic reproduction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.S10 Reproductive Politics in the United States (MIT) WGS.S10 Reproductive Politics in the United States (MIT)

Description

In this seminar, we will explore the significance of struggles over reproductive rights in the United States. Throughout the course, we will ask such questions as: What is reproductive freedom and why has attaining it been so central to women's liberation movements? Why have attempts to regulate reproduction been so prevalent in American politics? In this seminar, we will explore the significance of struggles over reproductive rights in the United States. Throughout the course, we will ask such questions as: What is reproductive freedom and why has attaining it been so central to women's liberation movements? Why have attempts to regulate reproduction been so prevalent in American politics?

Subjects

reproductive politics | reproductive politics | reproduction | reproduction | women's liberation | women's liberation | politics | politics | class | class | race | race | sexuality | sexuality | birth control | birth control | abortion | abortion | pregnancy | pregnancy | fetus | fetus | parenting | parenting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT)

Description

Lectures, laboratory sessions, and clinical case discussions designed to provide the student with a clear understanding of the physiology, endocrinology, and pathology of human reproduction. Emphasis is on quantitative analytic techniques and the role of technology in reproductive science. The course also involves the student in the wider aspects of reproduction, such as prenatal diagnosis, in vitro fertilization, abortion, menopause, and contraception.

Subjects

clinical case | physiology | endocrinology | pathology | human reproduction | quantitative analysis | reproductive technology | reproduction | prenatal diagnosis | in vitro fertilization | abortion | menopause | contraception

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.016 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.016 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

7.016 Introductory Biology provides an introduction to fundamental principles of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics for understanding the functions of living systems. Taught for the first time in Fall 2013, this course covers examples of the use of chemical biology and twenty-first-century molecular genetics in understanding human health and therapeutic intervention. The MIT Biology Department Introductory Biology courses, 7.012, 7.013, 7.014, 7.015, and 7.016 all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these mol 7.016 Introductory Biology provides an introduction to fundamental principles of biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics for understanding the functions of living systems. Taught for the first time in Fall 2013, this course covers examples of the use of chemical biology and twenty-first-century molecular genetics in understanding human health and therapeutic intervention. The MIT Biology Department Introductory Biology courses, 7.012, 7.013, 7.014, 7.015, and 7.016 all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these mol

Subjects

biochemistry | biochemistry | molecular biology | molecular biology | genetics | genetics | human genetics | human genetics | pedigrees | pedigrees | biochemical genetics | biochemical genetics | chemical biology | chemical biology | molecular genetics | molecular genetics | recombinant DNA technology | recombinant DNA technology | cell biology | cell biology | cancer | cancer | viruses | viruses | HIV | HIV | bacteria | bacteria | antibiotics | antibiotics | human health | human health | therapeutic intervention | therapeutic intervention | cell signaling | cell signaling | evolution | evolution | reproduction | reproduction | infectious diseases | infectious diseases | therapeutics | therapeutics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.340J Introduction to the History of Technology (MIT) STS.340J Introduction to the History of Technology (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the consideration of technology as the outcome of particular technical, historical, cultural, and political efforts, especially in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include industrialization of production and consumption, development of engineering professions, the emergence of management and its role in shaping technological forms, the technological construction of gender roles, and the relationship between humans and machines. This course is an introduction to the consideration of technology as the outcome of particular technical, historical, cultural, and political efforts, especially in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include industrialization of production and consumption, development of engineering professions, the emergence of management and its role in shaping technological forms, the technological construction of gender roles, and the relationship between humans and machines.

Subjects

STS.340 | STS.340 | ESD.52 | ESD.52 | Geography | Geography | systems | systems | manufacturing | manufacturing | communication | communication | management | management | industry | industry | industrial | industrial | nature | nature | electrification | electrification | mass production | mass production | industrialization | industrialization | war | war | military | military | Bell System | Bell System | nuclear | nuclear | cybernetics | cybernetics | flight | flight | Wright Brothers | Wright Brothers | aerospace | aerospace | gender | gender | airline | airline | reproduction | reproduction | computing | computing | internet | internet | computer | computer | electronics | electronics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.615 Feminist Inquiry: Strategies for Effective Scholarship (MIT) WGS.615 Feminist Inquiry: Strategies for Effective Scholarship (MIT)

Description

This course investigates theories and practices of feminist inquiry across a range of disciplines. Feminist research involves rethinking disciplinary assumptions and methodologies, developing new understandings of what counts as knowledge, seeking alternative ways of understanding the origins of problems/issues, formulating new ways of asking questions and redefining the relationship between subjects and objects of study. What makes research distinctively feminist lies in the complex connections between epistemologies, methodologies and research methods. This course explores how these connections are formed in the traditional disciplines and raise questions about why they are inadequate and/or problematic for feminist inquiry and what, specifically, are the feminist critiques of these int This course investigates theories and practices of feminist inquiry across a range of disciplines. Feminist research involves rethinking disciplinary assumptions and methodologies, developing new understandings of what counts as knowledge, seeking alternative ways of understanding the origins of problems/issues, formulating new ways of asking questions and redefining the relationship between subjects and objects of study. What makes research distinctively feminist lies in the complex connections between epistemologies, methodologies and research methods. This course explores how these connections are formed in the traditional disciplines and raise questions about why they are inadequate and/or problematic for feminist inquiry and what, specifically, are the feminist critiques of these int

Subjects

feminism | feminism | feminist | feminist | inquiry | inquiry | feminist inquiry | feminist inquiry | globalization | globalization | interdiscipline | interdiscipline | research | research | methods | methods | politics | politics | poststructuralism | poststructuralism | narration | narration | representation of the body | representation of the body | production | production | reproduction | reproduction | identity | identity | third wave feminism | third wave feminism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give the student a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of the menstrual cycle, fertilization, implantation, ovum growth development, differentiation and associated abnormalities. Disorders of fetal development including the principles of teratology and the mechanism of normal and abnormal parturition will be covered as well as the pathophysiology of the breast and disorders of lactation. Fetal asphyxia and its consequences will be reviewed with emphasis on the technology currently available for its detection. In addition the conclusion of the reproductive cycle, menopause, and the use of hormonal replacement will be covered.

Subjects

clinical case | physiology | endocrinology | pathology | human reproduction | quantitative analysis | reproductive technology | reproduction | prenatal diagnosis | in vitro fertilization | abortion | menopause | contraception | reproductive biology | menstrual cycle | fertility | impotence | anatomy | sexual differentiation | sex | pregnancy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT) 9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT)

Description

Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals. Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals.

Subjects

Behavioral modification | Behavioral modification | ethology | ethology | sociobiology | sociobiology | learning | learning | Social Status | Social Status | Cross-Cultural Differences | Cross-Cultural Differences | Persuasion | Persuasion | Politics | Politics | Individual | Individual | Sexuality | Sexuality | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | social organization | social organization | dominance structures | dominance structures | evolution of sexual signals | evolution of sexual signals | emancipation | emancipation | Mating | Mating | reproduction | reproduction | Emotion | Emotion | Facial Expression | Facial Expression | Displays | Displays | General Non-Verbal Communication | General Non-Verbal Communication | Sex Modeling behaviors | Sex Modeling behaviors | Machine interfaces | Machine interfaces | Cognitive ethology | Cognitive ethology | Comparative cognition | Comparative cognition | Signs | Signs | Symbols | Symbols | pharmacology | pharmacology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT) 9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT)

Description

Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals. Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals.

Subjects

Behavioral modification | Behavioral modification | ethology | ethology | sociobiology | sociobiology | learning | learning | Social Status | Social Status | Cross-Cultural Differences | Cross-Cultural Differences | Persuasion | Persuasion | Politics | Politics | Individual | Individual | Sexuality | Sexuality | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | social organization | social organization | dominance structures | dominance structures | evolution of sexual signals | evolution of sexual signals | emancipation | emancipation | Mating | Mating | reproduction | reproduction | Emotion | Emotion | Facial Expression | Facial Expression | Displays | Displays | General Non-Verbal Communication | General Non-Verbal Communication | Sex Modeling behaviors | Sex Modeling behaviors | Machine interfaces | Machine interfaces | Cognitive ethology | Cognitive ethology | Comparative cognition | Comparative cognition | Signs | Signs | Symbols | Symbols | pharmacology | pharmacology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Early development Early development

Description

This free course, Early development, looks at the human being in the context of an individual life cycle, examining some of the processes that contribute to the formation of a new person. After a brief discussion of historical ideas about human conception, and about contraception to the present day, we look at the cells involved in the conception and development of a new individual. Gamete production (that is, production of mature cells able to unite with another in sexual reproduction) in both men and women is introduced and the role gametes in fertility and, when things go wrong, infertility is explained. We then discuss the early development of a new individual, along with some thoughts on women's experience of pregnancy. First published on Thu, 24 Mar 2016 as Early development. To fi This free course, Early development, looks at the human being in the context of an individual life cycle, examining some of the processes that contribute to the formation of a new person. After a brief discussion of historical ideas about human conception, and about contraception to the present day, we look at the cells involved in the conception and development of a new individual. Gamete production (that is, production of mature cells able to unite with another in sexual reproduction) in both men and women is introduced and the role gametes in fertility and, when things go wrong, infertility is explained. We then discuss the early development of a new individual, along with some thoughts on women's experience of pregnancy. First published on Thu, 24 Mar 2016 as Early development. To fi First published on Thu, 24 Mar 2016 as Early development. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Thu, 24 Mar 2016 as Early development. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Biology | Biology | family | family | contraception | contraception | pregnancies | pregnancies | child development | child development | conception | conception | reproduction | reproduction | poison | poison | Paul Gilroy | Paul Gilroy | news cloud | news cloud | chromosomes | chromosomes | The Sound and the Fury | The Sound and the Fury | hormones | hormones | embryo | embryo | Living with poverty | Living with poverty | development | development | Pussy Riot | Pussy Riot | SK220_1 | SK220_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT) SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT)

Description

This course is designed as an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women's and Gender Studies, an academic area of study focused on the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political contexts. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions, and debates in Women's Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts feminist scholars have developed as tools for thinking about gendered experience. In addition, we will study the interconnections among systems of oppression (such as sexism, racism, classism, ethnocentrism, homophobia/heterosexism, transphobia, ableism and others). In this course you will learn to "r This course is designed as an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women's and Gender Studies, an academic area of study focused on the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political contexts. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions, and debates in Women's Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts feminist scholars have developed as tools for thinking about gendered experience. In addition, we will study the interconnections among systems of oppression (such as sexism, racism, classism, ethnocentrism, homophobia/heterosexism, transphobia, ableism and others). In this course you will learn to "r

Subjects

women | women | gender | gender | women's studies | women's studies | feminist | feminist | sexism | sexism | racism | racism | classism | classism | ethnocentrism | ethnocentrism | homophobia | homophobia | heterosexism | heterosexism | transphobia | transphobia | ableism | ableism | women's reproduction | women's reproduction | sexuality | sexuality | families | families | motherhood | motherhood | globalization | globalization | body image | body image | activism | activism | socialization | socialization | feminism | feminism | oppression | oppression | WMN.401 | WMN.401

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Sociology of Human Reproduction

Description

This module examines the social and cultural relations of human reproduction. It outlines the ways in which ideals about femininity, masculinity, gender relationships and ‘normal’ families are present in debates about who should and should not have children. It introduces a range of feminist theories on human reproduction and draws on empirical studies to explain and explore theoretical issues. It shows the interrelationship between social structures and controls over human reproduction, and how studying the way that society understands human reproduction helps to understand these wider social structures.

Subjects

sociology_of_human_reproduction | human_reproduction | sociology | medical_sociology | csapoer | ukoer | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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9.20 Animal Behavior (MIT) 9.20 Animal Behavior (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. The introductory topics will cover various approaches to the study of animals and their behavior. Key concepts in studies of animal behavior, emphasizing ethology, are covered in class and in the assigned readings from Scott (2005), supplemented by selections from other books, especially from classics in the field as well as selected videos. Next, key concepts in sociobiology are covered using readings from Alcock (2001), supplemented by selections from additional books and some video presentations. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. The introductory topics will cover various approaches to the study of animals and their behavior. Key concepts in studies of animal behavior, emphasizing ethology, are covered in class and in the assigned readings from Scott (2005), supplemented by selections from other books, especially from classics in the field as well as selected videos. Next, key concepts in sociobiology are covered using readings from Alcock (2001), supplemented by selections from additional books and some video presentations.

Subjects

animal behavior | animal behavior | ethology | ethology | behavioral organization | behavioral organization | sociobiology | sociobiology | mammals | mammals | behavioral ecology | behavioral ecology | naturalists | naturalists | behavioral evolution | behavioral evolution | social organization | social organization | sexuality | sexuality | mating | mating | reproduction | reproduction | animal learning | animal learning | antipredatory behavior | antipredatory behavior | feeding | feeding | foraging | foraging | adaptive behavior | adaptive behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.20 Animal Behavior (MIT) 9.20 Animal Behavior (MIT)

Description

Most of the major categories of adaptive behavior can be seen in all animals. This course begins with the evolution of behavior, the driver of nervous system evolution, reviewed using concepts developed in ethology, sociobiology, other comparative studies, and in studies of brain evolution. The roles of various types of plasticity are considered, as well as foraging and feeding, defensive and aggressive behavior, courtship and reproduction, migration and navigation, social activities and communication, with contributions of inherited patterns and cognitive abilities. Both field and laboratory based studies are reviewed; and finally, human behavior is considered within the context of primate studies. Most of the major categories of adaptive behavior can be seen in all animals. This course begins with the evolution of behavior, the driver of nervous system evolution, reviewed using concepts developed in ethology, sociobiology, other comparative studies, and in studies of brain evolution. The roles of various types of plasticity are considered, as well as foraging and feeding, defensive and aggressive behavior, courtship and reproduction, migration and navigation, social activities and communication, with contributions of inherited patterns and cognitive abilities. Both field and laboratory based studies are reviewed; and finally, human behavior is considered within the context of primate studies.

Subjects

animal behavior | animal behavior | ethology | ethology | behavioral organization | behavioral organization | human ethology | human ethology | habitat | habitat | sociobiology | sociobiology | mammals | mammals | behavioral ecology | behavioral ecology | naturalists | naturalists | behavioral evolution | behavioral evolution | habitat selection | habitat selection | social organization | social organization | sexuality | sexuality | mating | mating | reproduction | reproduction | animal learning | animal learning | antipredatory behavior | antipredatory behavior | feeding | feeding | foraging | foraging | adaptive behavior | adaptive behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.270 Anthropology Through Speculative Fiction (MIT) 21A.270 Anthropology Through Speculative Fiction (MIT)

Description

This class examines how anthropology and speculative fiction (SF) each explore ideas about culture and society, technology, morality, and life in "other" worlds. We investigate this convergence of interest through analysis of SF in print, film, and other media. Concepts include traditional and contemporary anthropological topics, including first contact; gift exchange; gender, marriage, and kinship; law, morality, and cultural relativism; religion; race and embodiment; politics, violence, and war; medicine, healing, and consciousness; technology and environment. Thematic questions addressed in the class include: what is an alien? What is "the human"? Could SF be possible without anthropology? This class examines how anthropology and speculative fiction (SF) each explore ideas about culture and society, technology, morality, and life in "other" worlds. We investigate this convergence of interest through analysis of SF in print, film, and other media. Concepts include traditional and contemporary anthropological topics, including first contact; gift exchange; gender, marriage, and kinship; law, morality, and cultural relativism; religion; race and embodiment; politics, violence, and war; medicine, healing, and consciousness; technology and environment. Thematic questions addressed in the class include: what is an alien? What is "the human"? Could SF be possible without anthropology?

Subjects

speculative fiction | speculative fiction | vampires | vampires | cyborgs | cyborgs | utopias | utopias | dystopias | dystopias | time travel | time travel | sexuality | sexuality | gender | gender | futurism | futurism | reproduction | reproduction | extraterrestrials | extraterrestrials | race | race | religion | religion | alienation | alienation | cultural studies | cultural studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT) SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT)

Description

<p>This course is designed as an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women's and Gender Studies, an academic area of study focused on the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political contexts. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts feminist scholars have developed as tools for thinking about gendered experience. In addition, we will study the interconnections among systems of oppression (such as sexism, racism, classism, ethnocentrism, homophobia/heterosexism, transphobia, ableism and others.) In this course you will learn to <p>This course is designed as an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women's and Gender Studies, an academic area of study focused on the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political contexts. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. This semester you will become acquainted with many of the critical questions and concepts feminist scholars have developed as tools for thinking about gendered experience. In addition, we will study the interconnections among systems of oppression (such as sexism, racism, classism, ethnocentrism, homophobia/heterosexism, transphobia, ableism and others.) In this course you will learn to

Subjects

women's studies | women's studies | gender studies | gender studies | sex | sex | gender | gender | oppression | oppression | sexism | sexism | racism | racism | ethnocentrism | ethnocentrism | homophobia | homophobia | heterosexism | heterosexism | transphobia ableism | transphobia ableism | sexuality | sexuality | reproduction | reproduction | families | families | motherhood | motherhood | women's health | women's health | globalization | globalization | activism | activism | politics | politics | feminism | feminism | patriarchy | patriarchy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give the student a clear understanding of the pathophysiology of the menstrual cycle, fertilization, implantation, ovum growth development, differentiation and associated abnormalities. Disorders of fetal development including the principles of teratology and the mechanism of normal and abnormal parturition will be covered as well as the pathophysiology of the breast and disorders of lactation. Fetal asphyxia and its consequences will be reviewed with emphasis on the technology currently available for its detection. In addition the conclusion of the reproductive cycle, menopause, and the use of hormonal replacement will be covered.

Subjects

clinical case | physiology | endocrinology | pathology | human reproduction | quantitative analysis | reproductive technology | reproduction | prenatal diagnosis | in vitro fertilization | abortion | menopause | contraception | reproductive biology | menstrual cycle | fertility | impotence | anatomy | sexual differentiation | sex | pregnancy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.691 Studies in Women's Life Narratives: Feminist Inquiry (MIT) SP.691 Studies in Women's Life Narratives: Feminist Inquiry (MIT)

Description

Feminist Inquiry starts with questions: What is feminism? What is feminist scholarship? Is feminist scholarship inherently interdisciplinary? Must feminist work interrogate disciplinarity? Must feminists collaborate? Our aim is to promote the development of feminist theory and methods by providing a forum for sharing, assessing, discussing and debating strategies used by feminist scholars to study topics such as gender and the body; sexualities; color and whiteness; migration, colonialism, and indigeneity. Feminist Inquiry starts with questions: What is feminism? What is feminist scholarship? Is feminist scholarship inherently interdisciplinary? Must feminist work interrogate disciplinarity? Must feminists collaborate? Our aim is to promote the development of feminist theory and methods by providing a forum for sharing, assessing, discussing and debating strategies used by feminist scholars to study topics such as gender and the body; sexualities; color and whiteness; migration, colonialism, and indigeneity.

Subjects

feminism | feminism | feminist | feminist | inquiry | inquiry | feminist inquiry | feminist inquiry | globalization | globalization | Islam | Islam | interdiscipline | interdiscipline | research | research | methods | methods | politics | politics | poststructuralism | poststructuralism | narration | narration | representation of the body | representation of the body | production | production | reproduction | reproduction | identity | identity | third wave feminism | third wave feminism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.380 Music and Technology (Contemporary History and Aesthetics) (MIT) 21M.380 Music and Technology (Contemporary History and Aesthetics) (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course is an investigation into the history and aesthetics of music and technology as deployed in experimental and popular musics from the 19th century to the present. Through original research, creative hands-on projects, readings, and lectures, the following topics will be explored. The history of radio, audio recording, and the recording studio, as well as the development of musique concrète and early electronic instruments. The creation and extension of musical interfaces by composers such as Harry Partch, John Cage, Conlon Nancarrow, and others. The exploration of electromagnetic technologies in pickups, and the development of dub, hip-hop, and turntablism. The history and application of the analog syn Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV special element audio. This course is an investigation into the history and aesthetics of music and technology as deployed in experimental and popular musics from the 19th century to the present. Through original research, creative hands-on projects, readings, and lectures, the following topics will be explored. The history of radio, audio recording, and the recording studio, as well as the development of musique concrète and early electronic instruments. The creation and extension of musical interfaces by composers such as Harry Partch, John Cage, Conlon Nancarrow, and others. The exploration of electromagnetic technologies in pickups, and the development of dub, hip-hop, and turntablism. The history and application of the analog syn

Subjects

audio | audio | music technology | music technology | sound recording | sound recording | sound reproduction | sound reproduction | contemporary music | contemporary music | experimental music | experimental music | electronic music | electronic music | synthesis | synthesis | synthesizers | synthesizers | music history | music history | music software | music software | analog recording | analog recording | digital recording | digital recording | digital audio | digital audio | music composition | music composition | computer music | computer music | Musique concr?te | Musique concr?te | rock music | rock music | rock and roll | rock and roll | hip hop | hip hop | circuit bending | circuit bending | phonograph | phonograph | radio | radio | noise music | noise music | recording studio | recording studio | sequencer | sequencer | sampling | sampling | sampler | sampler | sound art | sound art | electric guitar | electric guitar | turntablism | turntablism | scratching | scratching | electro-acoustic music | electro-acoustic music | music copyright | music copyright

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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