Searching for revitalization : 34 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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Egleston Square, Boston (MIT) Egleston Square, Boston (MIT)

Description

Revitalizing Urban Main Streets focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers three broad areas: an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed; the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives; and the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization. The course has dual goals: to explore the integration of economic and physical development interventions in ways that reinforce commercial district revitalization effor Revitalizing Urban Main Streets focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers three broad areas: an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed; the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives; and the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization. The course has dual goals: to explore the integration of economic and physical development interventions in ways that reinforce commercial district revitalization effor

Subjects

Urban business district decline | Urban business district decline | revitalization challenges | revitalization challenges | planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets | planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets | physical design and economic development perspectives | physical design and economic development perspectives | policies | policies | interventions | interventions | investments | investments | urban commercial revitalization | urban commercial revitalization

License

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21H.235 Metropolis: History of New York City (MIT) 21H.235 Metropolis: History of New York City (MIT)

Description

Hitherto it had gone by the original Indian name Manna-hatta, or as some still have it, 'The Manhattoes'; but this was now decried as savage and heathenish... At length, when the council was almost in despair, a burgher, remarkable for the size and squareness of his head, proposed that they should call it New-Amsterdam. The proposition took every body by surprise; it was so striking, so apposite, so ingenious. The name was adopted by acclamation, and New-Amsterdam the metropolis was thenceforth called. —Washington Irving, 1808 In less tongue-in-cheek style, this course examines the evolution of New York City from 1607 to the present. The readings focus on the city's social and physical histories, and the class discussions compare New York's development to patterns in other citie Hitherto it had gone by the original Indian name Manna-hatta, or as some still have it, 'The Manhattoes'; but this was now decried as savage and heathenish... At length, when the council was almost in despair, a burgher, remarkable for the size and squareness of his head, proposed that they should call it New-Amsterdam. The proposition took every body by surprise; it was so striking, so apposite, so ingenious. The name was adopted by acclamation, and New-Amsterdam the metropolis was thenceforth called. —Washington Irving, 1808 In less tongue-in-cheek style, this course examines the evolution of New York City from 1607 to the present. The readings focus on the city's social and physical histories, and the class discussions compare New York's development to patterns in other citie

Subjects

New York City | New York City | metropolis | metropolis | Harlem | Harlem | Bronx | Bronx | Brooklyn | Brooklyn | Queens | Queens | Long Island | Long Island | Manhattan | Manhattan | gay society | gay society | New Amsterdam | New Amsterdam | working class | working class | Haudenosaunee | Haudenosaunee | sex work | sex work | Chinatown | Chinatown | Tammany Hall | Tammany Hall | race relations | race relations | Civil War | Civil War | immigration | immigration | organized crime | organized crime | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | urban planning | urban planning

License

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11.016J The Once and Future City (MIT) 11.016J The Once and Future City (MIT)

Description

What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities - from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city - and the processes that shape them. The class Web site can be found here: The City. What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities - from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city - and the processes that shape them. The class Web site can be found here: The City.

Subjects

urban context | urban context | history | history | growth | growth | urban development | urban development | the city | the city | storytelling | storytelling | writing | writing | landscape | landscape | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood | 11.016 | 11.016 | 4.211 | 4.211

License

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4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT) 4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT)

Description

The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation. The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation.

Subjects

MIT | MIT | campus | campus | architecture | architecture | student life | student life | photography | photography | digital media | digital media | digital editing | digital editing | Photoshop | Photoshop | HTML | HTML | web design | web design | visual representation | visual representation | documentation | documentation | light | light | detail | detail | poetics | poetics | advising | advising | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | freshman experience | freshman experience | landscape | landscape | significant detail | significant detail | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | storytelling | storytelling | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT) 4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | visual art practice | visual art practice | critical analysis | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | time-based media | installations | installations | performance and video | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | visiting artist presentations | field trips | field trips | studio practice | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | aesthetic analyses | modern art | modern art | art history | art history | body | body | phenomenology | phenomenology | personal space | personal space | installation | installation

License

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Egleston Square, Boston (MIT)

Description

Revitalizing Urban Main Streets focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers three broad areas: an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed; the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives; and the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization. The course has dual goals: to explore the integration of economic and physical development interventions in ways that reinforce commercial district revitalization effor

Subjects

Urban business district decline | revitalization challenges | planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets | physical design and economic development perspectives | policies | interventions | investments | urban commercial revitalization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT) 4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT)

Description

In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr

Subjects

cities | cities | urbanism | urbanism | artists | artists | architects | architects | collaboration | collaboration | translation | translation | revitalization | revitalization | urban space | urban space | redistricting | redistricting | planned cities | planned cities | development | development | ground zero | ground zero | blank slate | blank slate | interventions | interventions | architecture | architecture | visual artists | visual artists | production models | production models | design process | design process

License

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11.439 Revitalizing Urban Main Streets: St. Claude Avenue, New Orleans (MIT) 11.439 Revitalizing Urban Main Streets: St. Claude Avenue, New Orleans (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers four broad areas: An overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed; The physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives; The policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization; and The formulation of a revitalization plan for an urban commercial district. This course focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers four broad areas: An overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed; The physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives; The policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization; and The formulation of a revitalization plan for an urban commercial district.

Subjects

urban studies | urban studies | new orleans | new orleans | revitalization | revitalization | urban planning | urban planning | flood | flood | disaster | disaster | Hurricane Katrina | Hurricane Katrina | urban main streets | urban main streets | urban | urban | st. claude avenue | st. claude avenue | recovery | recovery

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.945 Springfield Studio (MIT) 11.945 Springfield Studio (MIT)

Description

The Springfield Studio is a practicum course that focuses on the economic, programmatic and social renewal of an urban community in Springfield, Massachusetts by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers the areas of neighborhood economic development and the related analysis and planning tools used to understand and assess urban conditions from an economic and community development perspective. The Springfield Studio is a practicum course that focuses on the economic, programmatic and social renewal of an urban community in Springfield, Massachusetts by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers the areas of neighborhood economic development and the related analysis and planning tools used to understand and assess urban conditions from an economic and community development perspective.

Subjects

economic development | economic development | civic planning | civic planning | community planning | community planning | urban renewal | urban renewal | phasing | phasing | neighborhood revitalization | neighborhood revitalization | Springfield | Springfield | Massacusetts | Massacusetts | community interaction | community interaction | urban fabric | urban fabric | social renewal | social renewal | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | economic analysis | economic analysis | small business development | small business development | politics | politics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.016J The Once and Future City (MIT) 11.016J The Once and Future City (MIT)

Description

What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities - from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city - and the processes that shape them. The class Web site can be found here: The City. What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities - from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city - and the processes that shape them. The class Web site can be found here: The City.

Subjects

urban context | urban context | history | history | growth | growth | urban development | urban development | the city | the city | storytelling | storytelling | writing | writing | landscape | landscape | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood | 11.016 | 11.016 | 4.211 | 4.211

License

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11.016J The City (MIT) 11.016J The City (MIT)

Description

What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities -- from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city -- and the processes that shape them.The class website can be found here: The City. What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities -- from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city -- and the processes that shape them.The class website can be found here: The City.

Subjects

urban context | urban context | history | history | growth | growth | urban development | urban development | the city | the city | storytelling | storytelling | writing | writing | landscape | landscape | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood | development | development | urban form | urban form | downtown | downtown | inner-city | inner-city | suburb | suburb | edge city | edge city | Boston | Boston | 11.016 | 11.016 | 4.211 | 4.211

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT) 4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT)

Description

The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation.Technical RequirementsSpecial software is required to use some of the files in this course: .rm

Subjects

MIT | MIT | campus | campus | architecture | architecture | student life | student life | photography | photography | digital media | digital media | digital editing | digital editing | Photoshop | Photoshop | HTML | HTML | web design | web design | visual representation | visual representation | documentation | documentation | light | light | detail | detail | poetics | poetics | advising | advising | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | freshman experience | freshman experience | landscape | landscape | significant detail | significant detail | place | place | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | storytelling | storytelling | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Roslindale Square, Boston (MIT) Roslindale Square, Boston (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers four broad areas:an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed;the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives;the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization; andthe formulation of a revitalization plan for an urban commercial district. This course focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers four broad areas:an overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed;the physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives;the policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization; andthe formulation of a revitalization plan for an urban commercial district.

Subjects

main streets | main streets | urban neighborhood decline | urban neighborhood decline | urban design | urban design | urban development | urban development | physical development tools | physical development tools | economic development tools | economic development tools | revitalization strategies | revitalization strategies | retail | retail | market analysis | market analysis | assets | assets | capacity assessment | capacity assessment | existing conditions analysis | existing conditions analysis | streetscapes | streetscapes | neighborhood image and identity | neighborhood image and identity | zoning | zoning | business development | business development | organization | organization | capacity building | capacity building | marketing | marketing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.309J Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry (MIT) 11.309J Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry (MIT)

Description

This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing or investigating urban landscapes, and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on light, detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning. The current version of the class website for the course can be found here: Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry. This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing or investigating urban landscapes, and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on light, detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning. The current version of the class website for the course can be found here: Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry.

Subjects

photography | photography | landscape | landscape | light | light | significant detail | significant detail | place | place | poetics | poetics | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | storytelling | storytelling | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood

License

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11.309J Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry (MIT) 11.309J Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry (MIT)

Description

This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating landscapes and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, significant detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning, among other issues. The class Web site can be found here: Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry. This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating landscapes and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, significant detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning, among other issues. The class Web site can be found here: Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry.

Subjects

landscape | landscape | light | light | significant detail | significant detail | place | place | poetics | poetics | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | storytelling | storytelling | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood | 11.309 | 11.309 | 4.215 | 4.215

License

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11.945 Springfield Studio (MIT) 11.945 Springfield Studio (MIT)

Description

The Springfield Studio is a practicum design course that focuses on the physical, programmatic, and social renewal of an urban community in Springfield, Massachusetts by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers the areas of physical design/urban design and the related analysis and planning tools used to understand and assess urban conditions from a design and development perspective. Urban design issues are investigated in the context of social and economic challenges within the community. Thus, the course has dual goals: analyze physical conditions in the community, assess community need, propose physical design interventions; and assess community capacity and programmatic needs. The ultimate goal is to explore the integration o The Springfield Studio is a practicum design course that focuses on the physical, programmatic, and social renewal of an urban community in Springfield, Massachusetts by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers the areas of physical design/urban design and the related analysis and planning tools used to understand and assess urban conditions from a design and development perspective. Urban design issues are investigated in the context of social and economic challenges within the community. Thus, the course has dual goals: analyze physical conditions in the community, assess community need, propose physical design interventions; and assess community capacity and programmatic needs. The ultimate goal is to explore the integration o

Subjects

urban design | urban design | civic planning | civic planning | community planning | community planning | interactive design | interactive design | design studio | design studio | urban renewal | urban renewal | phasing | phasing | neighborhood revitalization | neighborhood revitalization | Springfield | Springfield | Massacusetts | Massacusetts | school design | school design | community interaction | community interaction | urban fabric | urban fabric | north end campus committee | north end campus committee | north end outreach network | north end outreach network | neon | neon | dusp | dusp | MIT Center for Reflexive Community Practice | MIT Center for Reflexive Community Practice | CRCP | CRCP | community center | community center | Massachusetts | Massachusetts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.309J Sites in Sight: Photography as Inquiry (MIT) 11.309J Sites in Sight: Photography as Inquiry (MIT)

Description

This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating landscapes and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, significant detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning, among other issues. The class website can be found here: Sites in Sight: Photography as Inquiry. This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating landscapes and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, significant detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning, among other issues. The class website can be found here: Sites in Sight: Photography as Inquiry.

Subjects

landscape | landscape | light | light | significant detail | significant detail | place | place | poetics | poetics | narrative | narrative | urban planning | urban planning | seeing | seeing | digital photography | digital photography | digital editing | digital editing | storytelling | storytelling | community | community | urban revitalization | urban revitalization | neighborhood | neighborhood | photography | photography | photographs | photographs | detail | detail | portfolio | portfolio | 11.309 | 11.309 | 4.215 | 4.215

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year (MIT)

Description

The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a body of work through a series of assignments, and then attempt to describe the conditions and emotions of their new environment in a cohesive final presentation.

Subjects

MIT | campus | architecture | student life | photography | digital media | digital editing | Photoshop | HTML | web design | visual representation | documentation | light | detail | poetics | advising | freshman seminar | freshman experience | landscape | significant detail | place | narrative | urban planning | seeing | digital photography | storytelling | community | urban revitalization | neighborhood

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.367 Studio Seminar in Public Art (MIT)

Description

How do we define Public Art? This course focuses on the production of projects for public places. Public Art is a concept that is in constant discussion and revision, as much as the evolution and transformation of public spaces and cities are. Monuments are repositories of memory and historical presences with the expectation of being permanent. Public interventions are created not to impose and be temporary, but as forms intended to activate discourse and discussion. Considering the concept of a museum as a public device and how they are searching for new ways of avoiding generic identities, we will deal with the concept of the personal imaginary museum. It should be considered as a point of departure to propose a personal individual construction based on the concept of defining a personal

Subjects

cities | urbanism | artists | architects | collaboration | translation | revitalization | urban space | redistricting | planned cities | development | ground zero | blank slate | interventions | visual art practice | critical analysis | long-range artistic development | two-dimensional | three-dimensional | time-based media | installations | performance and video | visiting artist presentations | field trips | studio practice | aesthetic analyses | modern art | art history | body | phenomenology | personal space | installation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.439 Revitalizing Urban Main Streets: St. Claude Avenue, New Orleans (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhood Main Streets by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers four broad areas: An overview of the causes for urban business district decline, the challenges faced in revitalization and the type of revitalization strategies employed; The physical and economic development planning tools used to understand and assess urban Main Streets from physical design and economic development perspectives; The policies, interventions, and investments used to foster urban commercial revitalization; and The formulation of a revitalization plan for an urban commercial district.

Subjects

urban studies | new orleans | revitalization | urban planning | flood | disaster | Hurricane Katrina | urban main streets | urban | st. claude avenue | recovery

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.945 Springfield Studio (MIT)

Description

The Springfield Studio is a practicum design course that focuses on the physical, programmatic, and social renewal of an urban community in Springfield, Massachusetts by combining classroom work with an applied class project. The course content covers the areas of physical design/urban design and the related analysis and planning tools used to understand and assess urban conditions from a design and development perspective. Urban design issues are investigated in the context of social and economic challenges within the community. Thus, the course has dual goals: analyze physical conditions in the community, assess community need, propose physical design interventions; and assess community capacity and programmatic needs. The ultimate goal is to explore the integration o

Subjects

urban design | civic planning | community planning | interactive design | design studio | urban renewal | phasing | neighborhood revitalization | Springfield | Massacusetts | school design | community interaction | urban fabric | north end campus committee | north end outreach network | neon | dusp | MIT Center for Reflexive Community Practice | CRCP | community center | Massachusetts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.309J Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry (MIT)

Description

This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating landscapes and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, significant detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning, among other issues. The class Web site can be found here: Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry.

Subjects

landscape | light | significant detail | place | poetics | narrative | urban planning | seeing | digital photography | digital editing | storytelling | community | urban revitalization | neighborhood | 11.309 | 4.215

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.016J The Once and Future City (MIT)

Description

What is a city? What shapes it? How does its history influence future development? How do physical form and institutions vary from city to city and how are these differences significant? How are cities changing and what is their future? This course will explore these and other questions, with emphasis upon twentieth-century American cities. A major focus will be on the physical form of cities - from downtown and inner-city to suburb and edge city - and the processes that shape them. The class Web site can be found here: The City.

Subjects

urban context | history | growth | urban development | the city | storytelling | writing | landscape | place | narrative | urban planning | seeing | digital photography | digital editing | community | urban revitalization | neighborhood | 11.016 | 4.211

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT)

Description

In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr

Subjects

cities | urbanism | artists | architects | collaboration | translation | revitalization | urban space | redistricting | planned cities | development | ground zero | blank slate | interventions | architecture | visual artists | production models | design process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.303 Dialogue in Art, Architecture, and Urbanism (MIT)

Description

In this class we will examine how the idea of the city has been "translated" by artists, architects, and other diverse disciplines. We will consider how collaborations between artists and architects might provide opportunities for rethinking / redesigning urban spaces. The class will look specifically at planned cities like Brasilia, Las Vegas, Canberra, and Celebration and compare such tabula rasa designs with the redesign of recyclable urban spaces demonstrated in projects such as Ground Zero, Barcelona 2004, and Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. While the course will involve some reading and discussion, coursework will focus largely on the students' own projects / interventions that should evolve over the course of the semester.  Of the two weekly class meetings, one will be a gr

Subjects

cities | urbanism | artists | architects | collaboration | translation | revitalization | urban space | redistricting | planned cities | development | ground zero | blank slate | interventions | architecture | visual artists | production models | design process

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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